Webinaire du CCNMO - Partager les pratiques exemplaires

198 vues

Publié le

L’outil pour partager les pratiques exemplaires aide les professionnels de la santé publique en exposant dans leurs grandes lignes cinq étapes concrètes pour partager les pratiques exemplaires à l’échelle de leur organisme. Faire connaître les pratiques exemplaires permet à ce dernier de tirer des leçons des réussites, de reproduire les programmes fructueux et d’améliorer les résultats.

L’outil pour partager les pratiques exemplaires guide les professionnels de la santé publique tout au long des étapes suivantes :
1. Rechercher les réussites.
2. Définir et valider les pratiques exemplaires.
3. Consigner les pratiques exemplaires.
4. Dresser un plan stratégique pour partager les pratiques exemplaires.
5. Adapter et appliquer les pratiques exemplaires.

Cliquez ici pour lire le sommaire qu’a élaboré le CCNMO sur l’outil : http://www.nccmt.ca/fr/ressources/interrogez-le-registre/84

0 commentaire
1 j’aime
Statistiques
Remarques
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

Aucun téléchargement
Vues
Nombre de vues
198
Sur SlideShare
0
Issues des intégrations
0
Intégrations
5
Actions
Partages
0
Téléchargements
2
Commentaires
0
J’aime
1
Intégrations 0
Aucune incorporation

Aucune remarque pour cette diapositive
  • the NCCPH program is dispersed across the country with 6 National Collaborating Centres
    the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools is located at McMaster University, in Hamilton
    4 of the other NCC’s support the use of research evidence in specific public health content areas
    NCCMT and NCC Healthy Public Policy work across content areas
    the focus of NCCMT improving access to, and use of, methods and tools that support moving research evidence into decisions related to public health practice, programs, and policy in Canada.
  • NCCMT offers a products and services to help apply research evidence in decision making
    This presentation today is going to provide an overview of the Online Learning Opportunities that NCCMT offers.
  • The Tool for Sharing Internal Best Practices was produced with funding from the United States Agency for International Development in 2005. Since then, the emphasis has shifted somewhat to the systematic process for effective knowledge sharing and learning to inform better public health outcomes. During this webinar, I will share how we have institutionalized this knowledge management (KM) process and highlight some of the KM approaches for sharing best practices originally mentioned in the Tool.
  • We believe the answer is through knowledge management.
  • Ultimately, KM means different things to different people. An organization’s strategic objectives and goals can determine what KM means to that organization and can guide that organization’s definition.

    The definitions of KM abound. A recurring theme, though, is that KM is a process and a set of tools and resources that support an organization’s business objectives. As a result, it’s imperative that an organization that is interested in implementing a KM initiative identifies the objectives and goals of it, just like you do with any set of interventions. In this way, KM can be defined in the unique language of that particular organization.
  • knowledge of what works (which may be identified/labeled as a best practice) must be produced, documented, shared, and used

    These benefits of KM mirror the benefits described of sharing best practices in the Tool for Sharing Best Practices.
  • HOW
    We connect program managers and health
    workers to the latest health knowledge that
    helps them to act effectively.

    We work at the global, regional, and country
    levels to strengthen capacity of others to get
    knowledge into the hands of program
    managers and health workers who need it most.

  • Most KM experts talk about 3 main components of KM: The people, the processes, and the technology.

    The “people” are the those who create and share knowledge. Collectively, they comprise the culture that nurtures and encourages knowledge exchange.
    The “processes” are the methods used to acquire, create, organize, share, and transfer knowledge.
    The “technology” refers to the mechanisms that facilitate knowledge exchange: They store and provide access to data, information, and knowledge created, acquired, organized, and exchanged by individuals in various locations.

    Likewise, in order to carry out a best practice initiative you need:
    People to facilitate identification and sharing of internal best practices, for example, by training or hiring staff to serve on a best practices team or act as a best practices coordinator;
    Processes and tools that are designed to share knowledge through reports, electronic discussions, and face-to-face meetings; and
    A commitment to take the time needed to identify, document, and share best practices.

  • People to facilitate identification and sharing of internal best practices, for example, by training or hiring staff to serve on a best practices team or act as a best practices coordinator;
    Processes and tools that are designed to share knowledge through reports, electronic discussions, and face-to-face meetings; and
    A commitment to take the time needed to identify, document, and share best practices.
  • Best practice initiatives generally employ two complementary strategies to share knowledge:

    These are examples of ways to capture and share explicit and tacit knowledge – which is ultimately a goal of knowledge management.
  • Pull/Connect (Asking): Systems, processes, behaviors that support people seeking knowledge from other people. Asking may be one of the most effective ways to transfer knowledge. People we often ask if they need knowledge. For example, many doctors will say they “ask a colleague” if they are looking for information vs. looking up the information in a text book. It is quick, effective, allows for back and forth.

    Use approaches and techniques: after-action reviews, peer assists, twinning, study tours, and communities of practice. – AARs and CoPs are highlighted in the Tool for Sharing Internal Best Practices.


    Push/collect (Publishing): Systems, processes, behaviors that support people contributing their knowledge to some form of database.

    Develop publications and resources: policy briefs, guidelines, journal articles, manuals, job aids, and project reports;


  • The steps in identifying and sharing best practices largely mirror the implementation phase or processes of the KM cycle.
  • Institute processes, systems, and tools for learning before, during, and after an intervention.

    At K4Health, we regularly employ peer assists, after action reviews, needs assessments, and other KM techniques to look at what is working or had worked and what isn’t working. We also invite other from the organization or other organizations for brown bags and other meetings to share their experience implementing similar interventions in different contexts.
  • Would you like more information on AARs?
  • We often collect stories or case studies as part of our observation as well as to provide more context to the information that we gather as part of FGDs and interviews.

    Usually, this type of qualitative date is gathered at the beginning of our engagement with a local partner as well as at the mid-way point to adjust our activities if warranted. And it goes without saying that activities should be grounded in evidence.
  • As I mentioned, we have a standard case study template as well as templates for a variety of other KM approaches that we employ that allow us to easily document our lessons learned.

    such as AAR, peer assist, storytelling, fail fair, CoP, NetMap,

    Depending on who the audience is for the best practice, will determine the media that we use for documentation purposes – blog, video, case study, guide, etc. – as well as where it is saved and with whom it is shared – whether that is internally and/or externally.
  • Communities of practice can be a great vehicle for not only identifying best practices but also documenting and sharing them. The Implementing Best Practices (IBP) for Reproductive Health Initiative
  • Webinaire du CCNMO - Partager les pratiques exemplaires

    1. 1. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Financé par l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada | Affilié à l’Université McMaster Les opinions exprimées ici ne représentent pas nécessairement celles de l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada. Partager les pratiques exemplaires Conférencière : Lisa Mwaikambo, M. H. P. 30 mars 2016, de 13 h à 14 h 30 (HE)
    2. 2. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Utilisez Q&A pour afficher des commentaires ou des questions pendant le webinaire. • « Envoyez » les questions à tous (et non en privé à l’animatrice) Problèmes de connexion • Connexion à Internet filée (et non sans fil) recommandée • Ligne d’aide WebEx offerte 24 heures sur 24, sept jours sur sept • 1-866-229-3239 Gestion interne 2 Q&A Panneau latéral du participant dans WebEx
    3. 3. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Après aujourd’hui La présentation PowerPoint (en anglais et en français) et l’enregistrement audio en anglais seront offerts. Ces ressources se trouveront aux adresses suivantes : PowerPoint: http://www.slideshare.net/NCCMT/ Audio Recording: https://www.youtube.com/user/nccmt/videos 3
    4. 4. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 1re question de sondage Combien de personnes regardent la séance d’aujourd’hui avec vous? 1. Il n’y a que moi 2. 2 ou 3 3. 4 ou 5 4. Plus de 5 4
    5. 5. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Your profession? Put a √ on your answer (or RSVP via email) / Epidemiologist Management (director, supervisor, etc.) Allied health professionals (nurse, dietician, dental hygenist, etc.) Librarian Physician / Dentist Other 5
    6. 6. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Partager les pratiques exemplaires http://www.nccmt.ca/resources/search/84 Épisode 23 6
    7. 7. 2e question de sondage D’où venez-vous? 1. BC 2. AB 3. SK 4. MB 5. ON 6. QC 7. NB 8. NS 9. PEI 10. NL 11. YK 11. NWT 12. NU 13. Extérieur du Canada 7
    8. 8. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo 8 CCN des maladies infectieuses Winnipeg, MB CCN des méthodes et outils Hamilton, ON CCN sur les politiques publiques et la santé Montréal, QC CCN des déterminants de la santé Antigonish, NS CCN de la santé autochtone Prince George, BC CCN en santé environnementale Vancouver, BC
    9. 9. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Registre des méthodes et des outils Occasions d’apprentissage en ligne AteliersMultimédia Public Health+ Réseautage et relations externes Produits et services du CCNMO 9
    10. 10. Poll Question #3 De quel secteur êtes-vous? 1. Santé publique 2. Santé (autre) 3. Éducation 4. Recherche 5. Gouvernement ou ministère provincial ou territorial 6. Municipalité 7. Analyse de politiques (ONG, etc.) 8. Autre 10
    11. 11. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Lisa Mwaikambo, M.H.P. Agente de programme niveau II Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project Conférencière 11
    12. 12. Approches au partage des pratiques exemplaires par la gestion des connaissances : Outil pour partager les pratiques exemplaires internes Lisa Mwaikambo, M. H. P. Agente de programme niveau II Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project
    13. 13. La question essentielle : Afin que nos objectifs soient atteints, est-ce que tout le monde possède les connaissances requises pour effectuer son travail convenablement et efficacement? … Sinon, comment pouvons-nous corriger la situation?
    14. 14. 4e question de sondage Qu’est-ce que la gestion des connaissances (GC)? 1. Un vague exercice intellectuel qui ne s’applique pas à tous 2. L’art de créer des sites Web et des bases de données 3. Une solution technique à un problème organisationnel 4. Quelque chose que font certaines personnes au sein de votre organisme, soit surtout les techniciens du service de TI ou les bibliothécaires, et qui ne s’applique pas à votre travail 5. Aucune de ces réponses 14
    15. 15. Qu’est-ce que la gestion des connaissances (GC)? a) Un vague exercice intellectuel qui ne s’applique pas à tous b) L’art de créer des sites Web et des bases de données c) Une solution technique à un problème organisationnel d) Quelque chose que font certaines personnes au sein de votre organisme, soit, surtout, les techniciens du service d’informatique ou les bibliothécaires, et qui ne s’applique pas à votre travail e) Aucune de ces réponses.
    16. 16. Notre définition de GC… Processus systématique qui consiste à recueillir et organiser les connaissances et à les faire connaître aux gens afin qu’ils puissent agir efficacement.
    17. 17. Analyse • Analyse de la situation • Analyse des parties prenantes ou du public • Analyse de la GC Conception stratégique • Établir des objectifs. • Choisir des interventions pour la GC. Évaluation • Connaissances • Pratique • Caractéristiques de réseau • Capacité de GC • Qualité, accès, portée • Renforcement du système de santé Surveillance Portée, utilité, convivialité, satisfaction, capacité de GC, caractéristiques de réseau, leçons tirées, pratiques exemplaires Gestion des connaissances : un processus systématique Mise en œuvre Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs (JHUCCP) 2013
    18. 18. POURQUOI la gestion des connaissances? • Permet de transformer des connaissances tacites en connaissances explicites. • S’attache à la surcharge d’information ou au problème d’information insuffisante. • Réduit le temps passé à chercher des ressources de qualité. • Aide à organiser l’information afin qu’elle soit plus facile à trouver. • Favorise l’adaptation et l’application des connaissances. • Permet d’appliquer la recherche à la pratique, ce qui est essentiel à l’intensification. • Améliore la prise de décisions et aide au changement de comportement. • Réduit les coûts de programme et empêche de « réinventer la roue ».
    19. 19. En fin de compte, les connaissances sauvent des vies! Fournir des connaissances aux gestionnaires de programme et aux fournisseurs de soins de santé sauve des vies.
    20. 20. Éléments communs aux initiatives touchant la GC et les pratiques exemplaires • Personnes • Processus • Outils, plateformes, technologies
    21. 21. 5e question de sondage Quels sont les processus de GC qui font partie des initiatives liées aux pratiques exemplaires? 1. Évaluation des besoins en matière de connaissances 2. Génération des connaissances 3. Collecte des connaissances 4. Synthèse des connaissances 5. Partage des connaissances 22
    22. 22. Question de sondage : réponse Les initiatives touchant les pratiques exemplaires exigent de recueillir les connaissances et d’en faire la synthèse (souvent sous la forme de publications et de ressources) et de les partager (par des discussions par voie électronique ou des réunions en personne, notamment).
    23. 23. Les initiatives touchant les pratiques exemplaires font intervenir : Deux stratégies complémentaires : • Produire et disséminer des éléments écrits, comme des bulletins, des rapports et des bases de données (connaissances explicites). • Organiser des rencontres en personne par des réunions, des séances d’encadrement ou de consultation, des communautés de pratique, etc. (connaissances tacites).
    24. 24. 6e question de sondage Quel genre d’approches à la GC avez- vous adoptées pour recueillir et partager les pratiques exemplaires? 1. Examens a posteriori 2. Communautés de pratique 3. Cafés du savoir 4. Foires de partage 5. Études de cas 6. Autre 25
    25. 25. Exemples d’approches à la GC adoptées dans les initiatives liées aux pratiques exemplaires Adapted from: Barnes, S. and Milton, N. 2015. Designing A Successful KM Strategy: A Guide for Knowledge Management Professionals. Information Today, Inc., Medford, NJ.
    26. 26. Étapes principales à suivre pour déterminer et partager les pratiques exemplaires 1. Rechercher des réussites. 2. Déterminer et valider les pratiques exemplaires. 3. Consigner les pratiques exemplaires. 4. Dresser un plan stratégique pour partager les pratiques exemplaires. 5. Adapter et appliquer les pratiques exemplaires.
    27. 27. 1re étape : Rechercher des réussites • Créer la culture et l’espace pour apprendre intentionnellement les uns des autres. • Écouter le personnel. • Cerner les problèmes de rendement.
    28. 28. 7e question de sondage Avez-vous déjà participé à un examen a posteriori? 1. Oui 2. Non 3. Je l’ignore au juste. 29
    29. 29. Question de sondage : réponse L’examen a posteriori est un processus simple dont se sert une équipe pour recueillir les leçons tirées des succès et des échecs antérieurs, dans le but d’améliorer le rendement. C’est l’occasion pour elle de réfléchir à un projet, une activité, un événement ou une tâche afin de mieux faire les choses la fois suivante. Il peut aussi servir dans le cadre d’un projet pour apprendre par la pratique. L’examen a posteriori est une forme de réflexion collective. Les participants examinent ce qui était prévu, ce qui s’est réellement passé, pourquoi les choses se sont passées ainsi et ce qui a été appris. Un membre anime le groupe et inscrit les résultats dans un tableau en papier ou un document.
    30. 30. 2e étape : Déterminer et valider les pratiques • Observer les gens, les sites et les projets qui donnent d’excellents résultats. • Tenir des discussions en groupe et des entrevues auprès des meilleurs. • Déterminer les facteurs contextuels qui favorisent la réussite. • Examiner les données probantes et les statistiques sur les services.
    31. 31. 3e et 4e étapes : consigner et partager les pratiques exemplaires • Collaborer avec les personnes qui interviennent dans la pratique. • Rédiger une description. • Créer un dépôt central.
    32. 32. 5e étape : adapter et appliquer • Rassembler les gens dans des réseaux. • Comparer les cadres où la pratique a été mise au point et où elle sera appliquée. • Se concentrer sur le transfert de l’idée qui sous-tend la pratique. • Songer aux facteurs externes qui pourront devoir être modifiés afin que la situation soit plus favorable à la pratique. • Surveiller l’application.
    33. 33. Vidéo de récapitulation (en anglais seulement)
    34. 34. Autres ressources sur l’GC • Site Web de Knowledge for Health : https://www.k4health.org/topics/knowledge- management • Global Health Knowledge Collaborative: https://www.globalhealthknowledge.org/ • Trousse d’outils en ligne sur la GC (inclut des études de cas) : k4health.org/toolkits/km • Cours d’apprentissage en ligne sur la GC dans les programmes sur la santé mondiale : https://www.globalhealthlearning.org/course/knowled ge-management-km-global-health-programs-0
    35. 35. QUESTIONS???
    36. 36. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo • Utilisez Q&A pour afficher des commentaires ou des questions durant le webinaire. • « Envoyez » vos questions à tous (et non en privé à l’animatrice). Q&A Vos commentaires ou questions 37 Panneau latéral du participant dans WebEx
    37. 37. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Votre rétroaction est importante Veuillez prendre quelques minutes pour partager vos idées sur le webinaire d’aujourd’hui. Vos commentaires et vos suggestions permettent d’améliorer les ressources que nous offrons et de planifier d’autres webinaires. Le sondage court se trouve à l’adresse : https://nccmt.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV _8jgs2mHJXGOfJt3 38
    38. 38. 8e question de sondage Quelles étapes allez-vous suivre ensuite? Je planifie… A. d’accéder à l’outil de partage des pratiques exemplaires; B. de lire le sommaire du CCNMO sur l’outil de partage des pratiques exemplaires; C. de songer à utiliser l’outil de partage des pratiques exemplaires; D. de parler de l’outil de partage des pratiques exemplaires à un collègue. 39
    39. 39. Joignez-vous à nous pour notre prochain webinaire Program Evaluation Toolkit (trousse d’outils d’évaluation des programmes) 11 mai, de 13 h à 14 h 30 (HNE) Le Centre d’excellence de l’Ontario en santé mentale des enfants et des adolescents a mis au point un outil pour planifier et exécuter l’évaluation des programmes, consulter des sources de données et analyser des données de façon continue. Joignez-vous à nous pour en apprendre davantage sur la manière dont cette méthode pourrait être applicable à votre organisme. Inscrivez-vous à l’adresse : https://health- evidence.webex.com 40
    40. 40. Follow us @nccmt Suivez-nous @ccnmo Financé par l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada | Affilié à l’Université McMaster Les opinions exprimées ici ne représentent pas nécessairement celles de l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada. Afin d’en savoir plus sur le Centre de collaboration nationale des méthodes et outils : Site Web du CCNMO : www.nccmt.ca Communications : nccmt@mcmaster.ca

    ×