How to best deal with the things that make china expats crazy
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How to best deal with the things that make china expats crazy

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In line at a service counter, a westerner scratches his head in bewilderment as he watches the Chinese woman who darted in front of him only a moment ago, just as he was stepping forward for his turn. ...

In line at a service counter, a westerner scratches his head in bewilderment as he watches the Chinese woman who darted in front of him only a moment ago, just as he was stepping forward for his turn.

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How to best deal with the things that make china expats crazy Document Transcript

  • 1. How to best deal with the things that make China expats crazy?source:http://trip-per.com/blog/index.php/how-to-best-deal-with-the-things-that-make-china-expats-crazy/In line at a service counter, a westerner scratches his head in bewilderment as he watches the Chinese woman who darted in front of him only amoment ago, just as he was stepping forward for his turn. He would like to say something to her, but she is already excitedly speaking with theclerk. He turns and glances at the dozen or so individuals who make up the line behind him. No one seems to have noticed what has just takenplace. Queue-cutting is an everyday occurrence in China, why would anyone take notice? Many newcomers to China find themselves taken abackby the phenomena that they regularly encounter. In addition to queue cutting, there are a host of other things that have amused and exasperatedtoforeigners in China for many years. What are these phenomena, and how does one cope with them?Some of the most talked about daily phenomena in China that can be difficult to become accustomed to, are spitting, public urination/defecation,and queue cutting. For the overly sensitive, perhaps it is best not to stay in China for long periods as the ubiquity of such sights makes themunavoidable, especially in smaller cities. But most people habituate, however reluctantly, when they realize that these things are normal in China.Some visitors to China complain about some of their interactions with Chinese people. In restaurants for instance, waiters and waitresses will oftenask for the customer’s order as soon as they enter the restaurant. The best way to deal with this is not to look at waitress incredulously while pickingup the menu, but to ask them to wait a few minutes while the selections are decided on. During conversations with locals, many internationalvisitors are surprised by questions they feel are too personal in nature. The appropriate response to these types of questions requires culturalunderstanding of China. In China, the norms of propriety are different, adjustments must be made. You can ask such questions as well withoutoffending the other party.Air pollution and traffic congestion can be found all over China. Environmental irritants such as these can contribute to stress, so it is imperativethat some steps are taken to cope with them. Beijing is notorious for its poor air quality and bad traffic. Wearing a mask will protect you respiratorytract when you go out, and help to put you at ease mentally. Using air purifiers indoors is also highly recommended. Avoiding traffic congestionrequires an understanding of all of the available public transportation system options. The metro is usually the most cost and time effective means
  • 2. of intra-city travel. But even the Subway can be crowded and uncomfortable. So timing is also important. You should try to familiarize yourselfwith the rush periods and slow periods which occur throughout the day, and adjust your China travel schedule accordingly.In general, dealing with any of the elements which produce “culture shock” always requires open-mindedness. Tourists or long term expats inChinabenefit greatly if they accept these circumstances and phenomena for what they represent: the norm. Dwelling on the worst things aboutChina will only incite embitterment, so one of the best strategies for coping with the unusual aspects of daily life in China is to look at the bigpicture. Think about the thing that impelled you to come to China in the first place, or focus on the things you love and enjoy the country.Posted in Chinese Culture and Art, Travel Tips. Tagged with Beijing, China, culture, fit in.