http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Jeremie Charlet
Plan
Rapide introduction au site web Discovery
1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire
2. Ce qu’il offre
3. Comment il ...
Plan
Rapide introduction au site web Discovery
1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire
2. Ce qu’il offre
3. Comment il ...
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
5
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
6
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
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http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
8
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
9
Rapide introduction à Discovery
Ce que l’on vient de voir:
• Rechercher ou parcourir des collections ou
consulter des inst...
Plan
Rapide introduction au site web Discovery
1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire
– Etat des lieux avant Discovery...
Pourquoi: état des lieux avant Discovery
Les archives étaient accessibles à travers de nombreux
systèmes et à différents e...
Pourquoi: nouveaux besoins
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
13
Plan
Rapide introduction au site web Discovery
1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire
– Etat des lieux avant Discovery...
Ce qu’il offre: But
Aider l’utilisateur à
–Trouver des documents pertinents
–Comprendre les archives
–Obtenir les document...
Ce qu’il offre à nos utilisateurs
aux chercheurs, étudiants, public,
gouvernement, personnel de TNA
• Un point d'entrée un...
Ce qu’il offre sur le plan technique
• Solide
– Gestion des échecs
– Gestion de pics élevés de trafic
– Détection d’ attaq...
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
18
Ce qu’il offre: quelque retours
“C’est formidable d'avoir toutes ces ressources à un seul endroit et de pouvoir les
explor...
Plan
Rapide introduction au site web Discovery
1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire
– Etat des lieux avant Discovery...
Comment: travail avec archives UK
Access 2 archives
– Récupérer le contenu de 400 archives: env 10millions de documents
– ...
ISAD(G)
{
"IAID" : "adb5d9bc-f67b-4e1d-af0a-4d52fb67c923",
"PIAID" : "148b7157-ec5e-4c58-8240-c5ebe05a6e25",
"LvlId" : 9,
...
Comment: Centré sur l’utilisateur
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
23
Comment: Méthodologie Agile
Interface Utilisateur
Système Back end
Base de données
Parcourir les
collections
Rechercher
Tr...
Sprint 1 Découv
Concevoir
Déveloper
Tester
Comment: Méthodologie Agile
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
25
Sprint...
Comment: Méthodologie Agile
•Voir les termes de la recherche dans les résultatsRelease 1
•Formulaire de recherche avancéeR...
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
27
Comment: Evolution des fonctionnalités
Comment: Evolution des fonctionnalités
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
28
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
29
Comment: Retours
• L'utilisation de technologies de pointe (Mongo DB) a payé
• Migré de technologies propriétaires vers de...
Plan
Rapide introduction au site web Discovery
1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire
– Etat des lieux avant Discovery...
Conclusion
Les raisons clés de son succès
• Axé sur les besoins des utilisateurs
• Itérations tout au long du développemen...
Conclusion
Bénéfices pour TNA
• Economies + réinvestissement des ressources sur le futur
• Rassemblement des données + uti...
Merci d’avoir écouté,
Questions ?
jeremie.charlet@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk
Découvrez en plus sur notre blog: http://blo...
TNA Portail Discovery
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TNA Portail Discovery

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Présentation aux archives de France sur pourquoi nous avons construit le portail Discovery des Archives Nationales du Royaume Uni, ce qu'il offre, et comment nous l'avons construit.

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  • The national archives is the official archive and publisher for the UK government and for England and Wales. We are the guardians of some of our most iconic national documents, dating back over 1000 years.
    We’re going to tell you the story of how we built Discovery and it’s a story that lasted for the 5 past years.
  • Can do a live demo instead of using below slides
  • Describe what we see,
    Read “What is Discovery” description to introduce the project
  • What can you do?

    Search for records held by The National Archives and other UK archives (TNA catalogue, A2A, MDR and NRA)
    Search and download records digitised by TNA
    and by departments and born-digital records
    Search for collections created by people, families, businesses, organisations and manors (NRA and MDR)
    Search for archive contacts (ARCHON)
  • If the document can be downloaded, you would have a link here
  • If the document is classified, you will see it here. Possibly make a FOI request
    If the document is available for download, there would be a link, or the cost of the document if costly
  • TNA Records information provided across many different systems and parts of the website
    End users: So many tools to master, have to search on every system
    Archival teams: So many systems managed and supported by different teams, some of them limited for expansion and future development, contributed to in different ways

  • Sector leadership and our support of the government policy on archives. We were given that responsibility while we started working on Discovery
    increased digitisation and born-digital records: while we’re limited in numbers with paper documents (we cannot finance the digitisation of everything), we just have to handle all new born digital documents, and there are more and more of them
    Legislative changes – eg manage FOI and Data Protection: we want documents to be opened by default and enable users to make FOI requests if they are closed
    Increasingly bleak financial outlook for the sector: like other business in the cultural field, less and less fundings from the government. many archives do not have the budget to build a website, maybe some of them cannot afford it anymore after a budget cut.
  • Helped to prioritize tasks. If it does not answer any of those goals, we probably do not need it

  • one of the main focuses of Discovery is that it needs to be be future proof in the sense that it can handle the high volumes of digital records that will be coming our way over the next few years.


    Robust
    Pairs of servers to handle failures
    Extra scale down instances hosted on could services to handle high peaks of traffic
    Detection of DOS attacks by firewalls (CheckPoint IPS) + automated reaction ( in development)

    Flexible and future proof
    3 tier architecture enables us to move tiers to cloud services if needed
    Use of shards on databases and search engine indexes:
    can be extended with extra servers
    Can be easily transferred to the cloud services

    Secure
    Platform highly constrained with (too) many physical firewalls
    Meets government legislation on security
    federated Single Sign On to TNA websites using .Net membership provider
    Discovery
    Transfer website for government staff
    Record copying: get a copy of non digitized records
    Expert contributions

    keep up with current technologies: a lot of innovation going on
    From SOA to micro services
    diverse: mainly .Net framework (WCF on the backend and MVC .NET for front end) but involves also javascript and php (front end), scala and java applications (back end), Mongo DB + Sql Server on the data layer
    Several open source technologies (Apache Solr, Wordpress, MongoDB, AngularJS, Akka.Net)


    NRA National register of archives
    A2A Acces 2 Archives
    Archon: contact directory of all archival repositories in UK
    MDR: manorial documents register, very niche, historical, but we have a legal requirement to maintain it
    TNA Catalogue: our archives here

  • Gives a good overview of what Discovery is focusing on:
    Several servers dedicated to search (solr servers)
    Lots of servers dedicated to metadata storage + most above all images: gridfs
    Does not include the filers that still hold most of the files (but we are migrating them progressively to gridfs)
  • Use this other quote instead for archival sector pro:
    “The project has succeeded in integrating diverse data and databases from hundreds of archives to create a beautiful and intuitive new resource that provides a greatly enhanced platform for catalogue information. Discovery will enable archivists to promote their collections more effectively and is certain to attract new users to archives”
    Feedback from a Senior Archives Services Manager, King’s College London



    Use each quote to illustrate something:
    1: as stated earlier
    2: people pay for documents online, no benefits on our side, just to finance digitization of documents
    3: we (TNA) are not the only ones to benefit from Discovery
    4: this focus on user needs will be detailed later

    Complete quote from King’s College:
    The Discovery team have succeeded in building an attractive new search engine that will enable users for the first time to fully explore descriptions of the nation’s archival heritage, alongside records held by The National Archives. The project has succeeded in integrating diverse data and databases from hundreds of archives to create a beautiful and intuitive new resource that provides a greatly enhanced platform for catalogue information. Discovery will enable archivists to promote their collections more effectively and is certain to attract new users to archives
  • Access 2 archives
    Biggest work of that scale worldwide at that time (2000 to 2008). About gathering the collections from 400 other archives (out of 2000 in UK). Stopped in 2008 by lack of funding
    We defined a common EAD schema from analysing their own schemas (they were using ISAD (G) but not EAD for most of them)
    Very complicated, most of them were not technical so we had to do the mapping ourselves, schemas varied extremely.
    10m documents, contents from 400 archives, is now outdated, but still offers online visibility to many archives which did not even have a website

    Discovery
    Schema designed through through trial and error
    Integrated A2A into Discovery in 2014 using the original data (does not include their latest updates but still provides them visibility)


    Expert Contributions
    Current ongoing project about providing a back office to external contributors so that they can directly update their documents into our database
    Start with the british library which is our most expert/technical partner
    Work iteratively. Will start reaching other archives once we got this one live and fixed most issues

    We agreed with Axiell archival software to provide a “export to TNA EAD format” feature to our archives in the future to get last version of their catalogues


    Speak in the end about the timeline
    First we built discovery website with our contents
    Then we integrated other archives contents
    And now we are working on a back office to enable other archives to update their contents
    > work step by step, get things working internally then integrate others
  • From ISAD(G) from another archives
    To EAD TNA format designed in Access 2 Archives
    To Discovery Information Asset format
  • We did it through user centred design. It means that we focus on users throughout the complete development of our products.
    And it starts with user research, we need knowledge about our users first (and this is something we already did before Discovery)
    We defined several categories of users using the hiking analogy, according to how advanced they are.

    Then we created personas for specific group of people: a description of a fictive user, with what he knows, what he does, what he expects from us and from Discovery.
    The purpose of personas is to create reliable and realistic representations of your key audience for reference within the project team and organisation wide. That way we’re clear that we’re not designing for us but for our user group. We updated the personas with staff from across the organisation in a series of interactive workshops.


    When we look at the complete list of personas, we find again the list of users mentioned earlier:
    Academics
    People interested in genealogy
    People completing administrative work
    People passionated in history
    Paid researchers from the gov, our staff, or businesses


    User Centred design in TNA since 2008, before Discovery
    When work started on Discovery, we already had a good amount of knowledge on our users

    1 – Different forms of user research
    We have carried out different forms of research throughout the project. We

    sought feedback through an online exercise
    sought feedback from visitors in our reading rooms showing them prototypes of the new designs
    spent a day speaking to members of the public in a cafe to get feedback from non-users of the site
    ran online surveys and used web analytics for more quantitative insights into how people use our website
    ran one to one, hour long sessions in London and Bristol with our users showing them the new designs, recruiting to our personas to ensure we spoke to the right people. We observed and listened as the participants carried out tasks and gave their feedback.
    We then took all this feedback, analysed it and made changes to finalise the new pages for release in beta.
  • Agility is a methodology that we used a lot in the government, that is recommended by Government Digital Services, that is the norm at TNA
    Describes how people interact
    Describes how we deliver a project

    Consider you want to bake a big cake that represents your website, each slice a functionality, each layer a component of your software.
    How do you implement that?
    If you do it like a construction site, you’re going to build everything, one layer at a time. And you’re gonna wait for everything to be built to test it. If you missed something, misunderstood something, maybe had it completely wrong, you’re going to find this out after 6months of development and this is going to cost you a lot.
    If you do it the agile way, you’re going to build one feature, maybe one sub-feature, at a time, and publish it immediately. So you can test it very quickly, and fail very quickly if there is anything wrong, and so, mend it very quickly while having wasted only 2 to 4 weeks worth of work.


  • Now we do that iteratively.
    We go through iterations (sprint) of 1 to 4 weeks.
    In which we go through a discover, dseign, develop, test phase. And we check it on the user on both the discover and the test phases, so twice in that very short iterations.

    And then we iterate, and work on next steps
  • Concrete example on Discovery
  • Example of the discovery phase: we build a mockup, a fake website, and go in the reading room and get it tested by end users: we immediately know whether it is going to be useful to them, and we don’t risk wasting weeks of implementation to learn it
  • Example of the test phase.
    We deliver most of our services directly in beta, a non finalized version
  • We iterate not only to build new features, but sometimes to redo things, to improves existing features.
    Good showcase is how our front page evolved from 2011 to 2014, as shown here.

    Discovery is a search engine, and when you think of what a good example of search engine is, we think about Google. Their User interface is minimized, super simplified. You don’t need to learn it to use it, you already know how to use it, but you can still do complex searches if you need and are more familiar with it.

    Gathering all those collections from different sources is extremely hard, and to make a simple UI too. But this is what we are trying to achieve with Discovery.

    On last version, a very visual interface, so that the end user can quickly scan it. Try to bring what he really needs first. He searches by default on all collections but can tick a box to search only within TNA. We hided the menu bar in that red button because few users are going to use it, etc.
  • First technical learnings then broader:
    Use cutting edge technologies: MongoDB at its start: tough to manage for 9 months with a lot of exchanges with Mongo, but pays off in the end
    better performances than Mysql, document db great to represent archival documents, scale with sharding
    built a very good relationship with Mongo, and they shaped their product for us, gave us discounts
    Move from proprietary Autonomy to Solr, RedDot to wordpress because of problems about supplier deliveries, their product’s life expectancy. And for money reasons

    We waited for 5 years to work on expert contributions, to get our own house in order (have a proper schema matching all our in-house collections)

    Look at how we have been working with other archives in A2A then Experts Contribution: first we tried to get their contents ourselves, but it could not really work, and it stops by lack of funding. Experts Contribution follows a different philosophy, we provide them with a platform and are going to guide/teach/help them to get their contents on it, but they are going to do it mainly themselves.


    Maybe add:
    Shiny vs non shiny Implementation of the back office AFTER the frontend: would have been better to implement both together? > work on front end first was good to show that’s useful and beneficial, but you must know that you’ll have to invest on the non shiny to get all the benefits.

  • Flexible: it’s not because we’re agile that we don’t have a plan. We plan a year ahead which features we want to bring. But we’re flexible with that plan, we’re going to reassess priority of our features on each iteration. We are maybe going to only implement a sub feature of a big feature, maybe we are going to postpone another big feature. Agile is about setting an amount of people working for a specific period of time. Not about trying to implement a specified set of features. We are going to implement what we think is best in the time we have, step by step. And we have the guarantee that we will provide something that works as a whole and will suit our user needs.

    Opened to fail: happy to redo things if necessary (browse is on the 3rd iteration)
  • Key Benefits to TNA

    Pull all the data + users together
    > easier to have holistic picture of all, better understand who our users are, what they need, what are our most popular collections

    Key benefits to archives
    Allows smaller archives to serve their contents to a wider audience (6m used Discovery on last year: no way a small archive could achieve that on its own)


  • TNA Portail Discovery

    1. 1. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk Jeremie Charlet
    2. 2. Plan Rapide introduction au site web Discovery 1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire 2. Ce qu’il offre 3. Comment il a été construit Conclusion sur les raisons clés de son succès et sur les bénéfices pour les archives http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 3
    3. 3. Plan Rapide introduction au site web Discovery 1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire 2. Ce qu’il offre 3. Comment il a été construit Conclusion sur les raisons clés de son succès et sur les bénéfices pour les archives http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 4
    4. 4. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 5
    5. 5. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 6
    6. 6. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 7
    7. 7. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 8
    8. 8. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 9
    9. 9. Rapide introduction à Discovery Ce que l’on vient de voir: • Rechercher ou parcourir des collections ou consulter des instruments de recherche • Afficher la description d’un document • Télécharger si disponible • Si le document est classifié, voir quand il sera déclassifié • Consulter les détails d’un centre d' archives qui détient le document http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 10
    10. 10. Plan Rapide introduction au site web Discovery 1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire – Etat des lieux avant Discovery – De nouvelles politiques, de nouveaux besoins 2. Ce qu’il offre 3. Comment il a été construit Conclusion sur les raisons clés de son succès et sur les bénéfices pour les archives http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 11
    11. 11. Pourquoi: état des lieux avant Discovery Les archives étaient accessibles à travers de nombreux systèmes et à différents endroits du site web  Pour les utilisateurs: trop d’outils à maîtriser  Pour nos équipes: trop de systèmes à gérer (8) Nous voulions • 1 espace unique pour le public pour trouver des documents • 1 outil unique à héberger, maintenir, mettre à jour et auquel contribuer http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 12
    12. 12. Pourquoi: nouveaux besoins http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 13
    13. 13. Plan Rapide introduction au site web Discovery 1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire – Etat des lieux avant Discovery – De nouvelles politiques, de nouveaux besoins 2. Ce qu’il offre – But – Fonctionnalités pour les utilisateurs – Exigences techniques – Quelques retours d’utilisateurs 3. Comment il a été construit Conclusion sur les raisons clés de son succès et sur les bénéfices pour les archives http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 14
    14. 14. Ce qu’il offre: But Aider l’utilisateur à –Trouver des documents pertinents –Comprendre les archives –Obtenir les documents http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 15
    15. 15. Ce qu’il offre à nos utilisateurs aux chercheurs, étudiants, public, gouvernement, personnel de TNA • Un point d'entrée unique • à des collections provenant de 2500 archives • Documents provenant d’organismes publics, mais aussi de particuliers ou organisations • Recherche • Instruments de recherche • Parcourir • Voir 7 télécharger des documents (documents de TNA actuellement) • Rechercher les coordonnées d’archives • Collaborer, marquer des pages, enregistrer des recherches, ... http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 16
    16. 16. Ce qu’il offre sur le plan technique • Solide – Gestion des échecs – Gestion de pics élevés de trafic – Détection d’ attaques DOS par les pare-feu • Adaptable et à l’épreuve du futur – Architecture 3 tiers – Utilisation de « shards » sur nos bases de données et index des moteurs de recherche • Sécurisé – Plate-forme hautement contrainte par de nombreux pare-feu physiques – Conforme aux lois du gouvernement sur ​​la sécurité – Single Sign On • maintenir avec les technologies actuelles – D’une « Service Oriented Architecture » vers des micro services – principalement .Net mais implique également javascript, Scala et java – Utilisation de plusieurs technologies open source – Accessible depuis un large panel d’appareils (ordinateurs, tablette, smartphone) • Fusion de NRA, A2A, ARCHON, MDR, TNA Catalogue, etc … • Plus de 32.4 m documents • Plus de 233k auteurs • Plus de 3,300 adresses d’archives • 40+ services back-end • 5,595,180 visiteurs l’année dernière http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 17
    17. 17. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 18
    18. 18. Ce qu’il offre: quelque retours “C’est formidable d'avoir toutes ces ressources à un seul endroit et de pouvoir les explorer facilement” Retour d’un membre du personnel “C’est brilliant! Etre capable d'identifier raisonnablement des archives généalogiques et les commander en ligne à un coût raisonnable est au-delà de mes rêves les plus fous! " Retour d’un client “Bravo pour cette transformation des ressources” Retour d’un professionnel du secteur des archives “Le panel d'évaluation a beaucoup aimé entendre parler de ce service important et fascinant et sa conformité au « Digital by Default Service Standard », cela constitue un défi pour d'autres services gouvernementaux d’atteindre le même niveau de qualité et d' attention aux besoins de l'utilisateur. D’après l’évaluation de Discovery par le panel d’évaluation de GDS (Government Digital Service) http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 19
    19. 19. Plan Rapide introduction au site web Discovery 1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire – Etat des lieux avant Discovery – De nouvelles politiques, de nouveaux besoins 2. Ce qu’il offre – But – Fonctionnalités pour les utilisateurs – Exigences techniques – Quelques retours d’utilisateurs 3. Comment il a été construit – Collaboration avec les archives du Royaume Uni – Conception centrée sur l’ utilisateur – Méthodologie Agile – Evolution des fonctionnalités – Retours Conclusion sur les raisons clés de son succès et sur les bénéfices pour les archives http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 20
    20. 20. Comment: travail avec archives UK Access 2 archives – Récupérer le contenu de 400 archives: env 10millions de documents – Un des plus grands travaux de ce type à l’échelle mondiale à cette époque (2000-2008) Discovery – 1 point d'entrée aux archives TNA puis aux autres archives UK – Schéma conçu par tâtonnements – Intégration d'Access 2 Archives en 2014 Expert Contributions – Actuellement en développement – fournir un back-office à d'autres archives afin qu'elles puissent mettre à jour directement leurs documents dans notre base de données – Démarrage avec la British Library http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 21
    21. 21. ISAD(G) { "IAID" : "adb5d9bc-f67b-4e1d-af0a-4d52fb67c923", "PIAID" : "148b7157-ec5e-4c58-8240-c5ebe05a6e25", "LvlId" : 9, "Lang" : "English and French", "HeldBys" : [{"XRefId" : "A13530664"}], "Ref" : "QSP/244/10", "Ttl" : "Papers relating to Harrow Parish", "CovDts" : "1879-1932", "CFrmDt" : "18790101", "CToDt" : "19321231", "PhysDescFrm" : "1 volume", "AcsConds" : "<p>View by appointment only</p>", "RstrOnUse" : "<p>Copyright restrictions apply</p>", "ImmSrcOfAcs" : [{"Desc" : "<p>The papers in this collection were made available by Catherine Stoye, the daughter of Professor G P Wells, in July 2001</p>"}], "CustHist" : "<p>This collection was first deposited at the United Reformed Church (URC) History Society in 1991</p>", "LocOfOrigs" : [{"Desc" : "<p>Original in possession of the Hon. Mary Berkeley</p>"}], "CpsInfo" : [{"Desc" : "<p>Microfilm Roll: PB 83</p>"}], "SC" : {"Desc" : "<p>Including business accounts and photographs</p>"}, "Links" : [{"XRefT" : "Related material","XRefD" : "<p>See also Vestry, accounts and rates</p>"}], "Src" : "A2A" } <c level="file" langmaterial="eng fre"> <did> <unitid label="Reference" countrycode="GB" repositorycode="55">QSP/244/10</unitid> <unittitle label="Title">Papers relating to Harrow Parish</unittitle> <unitdate label="Date" normal="18790101/19321231">1879- 1932</unitdate> <physdesc label="Extent"><extent>1</extent> <genreform>volume</genreform></physdesc> </did> <admininfo> <accessrestrict><head>Conditions of access</head> <p>View by appointment only</p> </accessrestrict> <userestrict><head>Restriction on use</head> <p>Copyright restrictions apply</p> </userestrict> <acqinfo><head>Immediate source of acquisition</head> <p>The papers in this collection were made available by Catherine Stoye, the daughter of Professor G P Wells, in July 2001</p> </acqinfo> <custodhist><head>Custodial history</head> <p>This collection was first deposited at the United Reformed Church (URC) History Society in 1991</p> </custodhist> <altformavail><head>Location of originals</head> <p>Original in possession of the Hon. Mary Berkeley</p> </altformavail> <altformavail><head>Copies information</head> <p>Microfilm Roll: PB 83</p> </altformavail> </admininfo> <scopecontent><head>Description</head> <p>Including business accounts and photographs</p> </scopecontent> <add> <relatedmaterial><head>Related material</head> <p>See also Vestry, accounts and rates</p> </relatedmaterial> </add> </c> Format Discovery http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 22 EAD
    22. 22. Comment: Centré sur l’utilisateur http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 23
    23. 23. Comment: Méthodologie Agile Interface Utilisateur Système Back end Base de données Parcourir les collections Rechercher Trouver des archives http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 24
    24. 24. Sprint 1 Découv Concevoir Déveloper Tester Comment: Méthodologie Agile http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 25 Sprint 1 Découvrir Concevoir Déveloper Tester Sprint 1 Découvrir Concevoir Déveloper Tester
    25. 25. Comment: Méthodologie Agile •Voir les termes de la recherche dans les résultatsRelease 1 •Formulaire de recherche avancéeRelease 2 •Exporter 1000 résultats de recherche au format CSV, HTML, XMLRelease 3 •Permettre à l’utilisateur de soumettre une correctionRelease 6 •Améliorer la fonction ParcourirRelease 7 •Voir documents associés à un tag dans la page “mes tags”Release 9 http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 26 Release 1 • Sprint 1: 2/5/2011 • Sprint 2: 16/5 > 27/05 Release 2 • Sprint 1: 30/06 • Sprint 2: 13/06 … Release 12 • Sprint 1: 26/3/2012 • Sprint 2: 9/4/2012
    26. 26. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 27 Comment: Evolution des fonctionnalités
    27. 27. Comment: Evolution des fonctionnalités http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 28
    28. 28. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 29
    29. 29. Comment: Retours • L'utilisation de technologies de pointe (Mongo DB) a payé • Migré de technologies propriétaires vers des technologies open source • Avoir une solution solide en interne avant de s’attaquer aux autres archives • Travailler avec les autres archives de manière plus collaborative http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 30
    30. 30. Plan Rapide introduction au site web Discovery 1. Pourquoi un portail était-il nécessaire – Etat des lieux avant Discovery – De nouvelles politiques, de nouveaux besoins 2. Ce qu’il offre – But – Fonctionnalités pour les utilisateurs – Exigences techniques – Quelques retours d’utilisateurs 3. Comment il a été construit – Collaboration avec les archives du Royaume Uni – Conception centrée sur l’ utilisateur – Méthodologie Agile – Evolution des fonctionnalités – Retours Conclusion sur les raisons clés de son succès et sur les bénéfices pour les archives http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 31
    31. 31. Conclusion Les raisons clés de son succès • Axé sur les besoins des utilisateurs • Itérations tout au long du développement et flexible sur les échéances • Prêt à prendre des risques, quitte à recommencer http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 32
    32. 32. Conclusion Bénéfices pour TNA • Economies + réinvestissement des ressources sur le futur • Rassemblement des données + utilisateurs • Nous a mis dans une position ou nous menons le secteur Bénéfices pour les autres archives du Royaume Uni • Accès à un large public (6millions visiteurs sur Discovery l'an dernier) • Valeur ajoutée à leurs services • La sécurité que leur catalogue restera en ligne, sera maintenu, amélioré • Tout cela indépendamment des réductions qu'ils peuvent éprouver http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 33
    33. 33. Merci d’avoir écouté, Questions ? jeremie.charlet@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk Découvrez en plus sur notre blog: http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ 34

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