Groovy Domain Specific Languages - SpringOne2GX 2012
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Groovy Domain Specific Languages - SpringOne2GX 2012

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Paul King, Andrew Eisenberg and Guillaume Laforge present about implementation of Domain-Specific Languages in Groovy, while at the SpringOne2GX 2012 conference in Washington DC.

Paul King, Andrew Eisenberg and Guillaume Laforge present about implementation of Domain-Specific Languages in Groovy, while at the SpringOne2GX 2012 conference in Washington DC.

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Groovy Domain Specific Languages - SpringOne2GX 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Groovy Domain-Specific LanguagesAndrew Eisenberg Paul King Guillaume LaforgeGroovy Eclipse Project Lead Groovy Core Developer Groovy Project Manager SpringSource / VMware ASERT SpringSource / VMware @werdnagreb @paulk_asert @glaforge © 2012 SpringOne 2GX. All rights reserved. Do not distribute without permission.
  • 2. Andrew Eisenberg • Groovy-Eclipse project lead • Senior Member of Technical Staff,VMware Tools Team – Grails-IDE, GGTS, AJDT, STS, Scripted, Orion project • PhD in Computer Science from University of British Columbia • Follow me: – Twitter: @werdnagreb – Blog: http://contraptionsforprogramming.blogspot.ca/ – Google+: http://gplus.to/aeisenberg2
  • 3. Paul King • Groovy Core Committer • Leads ASERT – software, training, consultancy company based in Brisbane, Australia • PhD in Computer Science from The University of Queensland • Co-author of Groovy in Action • Follow me: – Twitter: @paulk_asert3
  • 4. Guillaume Laforge • Groovy Project Manager at VMware • Initiator of the Grails framework • Creator of the Gaelyk • Co-author of Groovy in Action • Follow me: • My blog: http://glaforge.appspot.com • Twitter: @glaforge • Google+: http://gplus.to/glaforge4
  • 5. Introduction Definitions Examples Goals Pros & cons© 2012 SpringOne 2GX. All rights reserved. Do not distribute without permission.
  • 6. Domain-Specific Languages { } A Domain-Specific Language is a programming language or executable specification language that offers, through appropriate notations and abstractions, expressive power focused on, and usually restricted to, a particular problem domain. • In contrast to General Purpose Languages • Also known as: fluent / humane interfaces, language oriented programming, little or mini languages, macros, business natural languages...6
  • 7. Technical examples XSLT<?xml version="1.0"?> Glade Regex <?xml version="1.0"?><GTK-Interface> <xsl:stylesheetversion="1.0"<widget> <class>GtkWindow</class> xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"> <name>HelloWindow</name> <xsl:output method="xml"/> <border_width>5</border_width> <xsl:template match="*"> <Signal> <xsl:element name="{name()}"> <name>destroy</name> <xsl:for-each select="@*"> <handler>gtk_main_quit</handler> <xsl:element name="{name()}"> </Signal> <title>Hello</title> <xsl:value-of select="."/> </xsl:element> "x.z?z{1,3}y" <type>GTK_WINDOW_TOPLEVEL</type> </xsl:for-each> <position>GTK_WIN_POS_NONE</position> <xsl:apply-templates select="*|text()"/> <allow_shrink>True</allow_shrink> </xsl:element> <allow_grow>True</allow_grow> </xsl:template> <auto_shrink>False</auto_shrink> </xsl:stylesheet> <widget> <class>GtkButton</class> Fetchmail <name>Hello World</name> <can_focus>True</can_focus> <label>Hello World</label> # Poll this site first each cycle. SQL poll pop.provider.net proto pop3 </widget> user "jsmith" with pass "secret1" is "smith" here</widget> user jones with pass "secret2" is "jjones" here with options keep</GTK-Interface> # Poll this site second, unless Lord Voldemort zaps us first. poll billywig.hogwarts.com with proto imap: user harry_potter with pass "floo" is harry_potter here SELECT * FROM TABLE # Poll this site third in the cycle. WHERE NAME LIKE %SMI # Password will be fetched from ~/.netrc poll mailhost.net with proto imap: ORDER BY NAME user esr is esr here
  • 8. Antimalaria drug Insurance policy risk HR skills representationresistance simulation calculation engine Nuclear safety simulationsMarket data feeds analysis Loan acceptance rules engine
  • 9. Goals of DSLs • Use a more expressive language than a general-purpose one • Share a common metaphor of understanding between developers and subject matter experts • Have domain experts help with the design of the business logic of an application • Avoid cluttering business code with too much boilerplate technical code thanks to a clean separation • Let business rules have their own lifecycle9
  • 10. Pros and cons Pros Cons – Domain experts can help, – Learning cost vs. limited applicability validate, modify, and often – Cost of designing, implementing & develop DSL programs maintaining DSLs as well as tools/ – Somewhat self-documenting IDEs – Enhance quality, productivity, – Attaining proper scope reliability, maintainability, – Trade-offs between domain portability, reusability specificity and general purpose – Safety; as long as the language language constructs constructs are safe, any DSL – Efficiency cost sentence can be considered safe – Proliferation of similar non-standard DSLs10
  • 11. Groovy provides... • A flexible and malleable syntax – scripts, native syntax constructs (list, map, ranges), closures, less punctuation... • Compile-time and runtime meta-programming – metaclasses, AST transformations – also operator overloading • The ability to easily integrate into Java / Spring apps – also security and safety11
  • 12. Let’s get started!© 2012 SpringOne 2GX. All rights reserved. Do not distribute without permission.
  • 13. Your mission: build a DSL for a Mars robot
  • 14. We need a robot! package  mars class  Robot  {}15
  • 15. It should move... package  mars   class  Robot  {        void  move()  {} }16
  • 16. ..in a direction! package  mars   class  Robot  {        void  move(String  dir)  {} }17
  • 17. More explicit direction package  mars   class  Robot  {        void  move(Direction  dir)  {} } package  mars   enum  Direction  {        left,  right,  forward,  backward }18
  • 18. Now how can we control it? import  static  mars.Direction.*; import  mars.Robot; public  class  Command  {        public  static  void  main(String[]  args)  {                Robot  robot  =  new  Robot();                robot.move(left);        } }19
  • 19. Now how can we control it? import  static  mars.Direction.*; import  mars.Robot; public  class  Command  {        public  static  void  main(String[]  args)  {                Robot  robot  =  new  Robot();                robot.move(left);        } } Syntactical noise!19
  • 20. Now how can we control it?                                                            — import  static  mars.Direction.*;                                  — import  mars.Robot; —————————————————————— public  class  Command  {        ————————————————————————————————————————        public  static  void  main(String[]  args)  {                —————                                        —                Robot  robot  =  new  Robot();                                    —        ——                robot.move(left);        —        } — } Syntactical noise!19
  • 21. Optional semicolons & parentheses / Scripts vs classes import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot                def      robot  =  new  Robot()                robot.move  left20
  • 22. Optional semicolons & parentheses / Scripts vs classes import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot Optional typing                def      robot  =  new  Robot()                robot.move  left20
  • 23. Optional semicolons & parentheses / Scripts vs classes import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot Optional typing                def      robot  =  new  Robot()                robot.move  left But I don’t want to compile a script for every command!20
  • 24. Integration
  • 25. GroovyShell to the rescue22
  • 26. GroovyShell to the rescue def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell() shell.evaluate(        new  File("command.groovy") )22
  • 27. GroovyShell to the rescue def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell() shell.evaluate( integration.groovy        new  File("command.groovy") )22
  • 28. GroovyShell to the rescue def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell() shell.evaluate( integration.groovy        new  File("command.groovy") ) import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot def  robot  =  new  Robot() robot.move  left22
  • 29. GroovyShell to the rescue def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell() shell.evaluate( integration.groovy        new  File("command.groovy") ) import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot command.groovy def  robot  =  new  Robot() robot.move  left22
  • 30. Integration mechanisms • Different solutions available: – Groovy’s own mechanisms • GroovyScriptEngine, GroovyShell, GroovyClassLoader, Eval – Java 6: javax.script.* / JSR-223 • Groovy provides a JSR-223 implementation – Spring’s lang namespace • Groovy provides the highest level of flexibility and customization, but JSR-223 is a standard...23
  • 31. Integration mechanisms • Different solutions available: – Groovy’s own mechanisms • GroovyScriptEngine, GroovyShell, GroovyClassLoader, Eval – Java 6: javax.script.* / JSR-223 • Groovy provides a JSR-223 implementation – Spring’s lang namespace • Groovy provides the highest level of flexibility and customization, but JSR-223 is a standard...23
  • 32. What’s wrong with our DSL? import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot def  robot  =  new  Robot() robot.move  left24
  • 33. What’s wrong with our DSL? Can’t we hide those imports? import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot def  robot  =  new  Robot() robot.move  left24
  • 34. What’s wrong with our DSL? Can’t we hide those imports? import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot def  robot  =  new  Robot() robot.move  left Can’t we inject the robot?24
  • 35. What’s wrong with our DSL? Can’t we hide those imports? import  static  mars.Direction.* import  mars.Robot def  robot  =  new  Robot() robot.move  left Can’t we inject Do we really need to the robot? repeat ‘robot’?24
  • 36. I’m sorry Dave,you can’t do that!
  • 37. I’m sorry Dave,you can’t do that!
  • 38. What we really want is...  move  left  26
  • 39. Let’s inject a robot! • We can pass data in / out of scripts through the Binding – basically just a map of variable name keys and their associated values27
  • 40. Let’s inject a robot! • We can pass data in / out of scripts through the Binding – basically just a map of variable name keys and their associated values def  binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  new  mars.Robot() ]) def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell(binding) shell.evaluate(        new  File("command.groovy") )27
  • 41. Let’s inject a robot! • We can pass data in / out of scripts through the Binding – basically just a map of variable name keys and their associated values integration.groovy def  binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  new  mars.Robot() ]) def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell(binding) shell.evaluate(        new  File("command.groovy") )27
  • 42. Better? import  static  mars.Direction.* robot.move  left28
  • 43. Better? Robot import removed import  static  mars.Direction.* robot.move  left28
  • 44. Better? Robot import removed import  static  mars.Direction.* robot.move  left Robot injected, no ‘new’ needed28
  • 45. How to inject the direction? • Using the import  mars.* binding... def  binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  new  Robot(),        left:          Direction.left,        right:        Direction.right,        backward:  Direction.backward,        forward:    Direction.forward ]) def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell(binding) shell.evaluate(        new  File("command.groovy") )29
  • 46. How to inject the direction? • Using the import  mars.* Fragile in case of new directions! binding... def  binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  new  Robot(),        left:          Direction.left,        right:        Direction.right,        backward:  Direction.backward,        forward:    Direction.forward ]) def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell(binding) shell.evaluate(        new  File("command.groovy") )29
  • 47. How to inject the direction? • Using the import  mars.*   binding... def  binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  new  Robot(),        *:  Direction.values()                        .collectEntries  { Spread map                                [(it.name()):  it] operator                        } ]) def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell(binding) shell.evaluate(        new  File("command.groovy") )30
  • 48. How to inject the direction? • Using string concatenation? • Using compiler customizers31
  • 49. String concatenation? Bad idea! new  GroovyShell(new  Binding([robot:  new  mars.Robot()]))        .evaluate("import  static  mars.Direction.*n"  +                            "robot.move  left")32
  • 50. String concatenation? Bad idea! Cheat with string concatenation? Bad! new  GroovyShell(new  Binding([robot:  new  mars.Robot()]))        .evaluate("import  static  mars.Direction.*n"  +                            "robot.move  left")32
  • 51. String concatenation? Bad idea! new  GroovyShell(new  Binding([robot:  new  mars.Robot()]))        .evaluate("import  static  mars.Direction.*n"  +                            "robot.move  left")32
  • 52. String concatenation? Bad idea! Line #1 becomes Line #2 new  GroovyShell(new  Binding([robot:  new  mars.Robot()]))        .evaluate("import  static  mars.Direction.*n"  +                            "robot.move  left")32
  • 53. String concatenation? Bad idea! new  GroovyShell(new  Binding([robot:  new  mars.Robot()]))        .evaluate("import  static  mars.Direction.*n"  +                            "robot.move  left")32
  • 54. Compilation customizers • Ability to apply some customization to the Groovy compilation process • Three available customizers Groovy 1.8 – ImportCustomizer: add transparent imports – ASTTransformationCustomizer: injects an AST transform – SecureASTCustomizer: restrict the groovy language to an allowed subset • But you can implement your own33
  • 55. Imports customizer def  configuration  =  new  CompilerConfiguration()   def  imports  =  new  ImportCustomizer() imports.addStaticStar(mars.Direction.name) configuration.addCompilationCustomizers(imports)     new  GroovyShell(new  Binding([robot:  new  mars.Robot()]),                                      configuration)        .evaluate("robot.move  left")            34
  • 56. AST transformation customizer def  configuration  =  new  CompilerConfiguration()   def  imports  =  new  ImportCustomizer() imports.addStaticStar(mars.Direction.name) configuration.addCompilationCustomizers(imports,                          new  ASTTransformationCustomizer(Log))   new  GroovyShell(new  Binding([robot:  new  mars.Robot()]),                                    configuration)        .evaluate("robot.move  left"  +  "n"                            "log.info  ‘Robot  moved’")                      35
  • 57. AST transformation customizer def  configuration  =  new  CompilerConfiguration()   def  imports  =  new  ImportCustomizer() imports.addStaticStar(mars.Direction.name) configuration.addCompilationCustomizers(imports,                          new  ASTTransformationCustomizer(Log))   new  GroovyShell(new  Binding([robot:  new  mars.Robot()]),                                    configuration)        .evaluate("robot.move  left"  +  "n"                            "log.info  ‘Robot  moved’")                       @Log injects a logger in scripts and classes35
  • 58. Secure the onboardtrajectory calculator
  • 59. Secure AST customizer • Let’s set up our environment – an import customizer to import java.lang.Math.* – prepare a secure AST customizer def  imports  =  new  ImportCustomizer()                                    .addStaticStars(java.lang.Math) def  secure  =  new  SecureASTCustomizer()37
  • 60. Secure AST customizer Idea: secure the rocket’s onboard trajectory calculation system by allowing only math expressions to be evaluated by the calculator • Let’s set up our environment – an import customizer to import java.lang.Math.* – prepare a secure AST customizer def  imports  =  new  ImportCustomizer()                                    .addStaticStars(java.lang.Math) def  secure  =  new  SecureASTCustomizer()37
  • 61. Secure AST customizer ... secure.with  { //  disallow  closure  creation closuresAllowed  =  false   //  disallow  method  definitions methodDefinitionAllowed  =  false     //  empty  white  list  =>  forbid  imports importsWhitelist  =  []   staticImportsWhitelist  =  [] //  only  allow  the  java.lang.Math.*  static  import staticStarImportsWhitelist  =  [java.lang.Math] ...38
  • 62. Secure AST customizer Disallow closures ... and methods secure.with  { //  disallow  closure  creation closuresAllowed  =  false   //  disallow  method  definitions methodDefinitionAllowed  =  false     //  empty  white  list  =>  forbid  imports importsWhitelist  =  []   staticImportsWhitelist  =  [] //  only  allow  the  java.lang.Math.*  static  import staticStarImportsWhitelist  =  [java.lang.Math] ...38
  • 63. Secure AST customizer Disallow closures ... and methods secure.with  { //  disallow  closure  creation closuresAllowed  =  false   //  disallow  method  definitions Black / white list methodDefinitionAllowed  =  false   imports   //  empty  white  list  =>  forbid  imports importsWhitelist  =  []   staticImportsWhitelist  =  [] //  only  allow  the  java.lang.Math.*  static  import staticStarImportsWhitelist  =  [java.lang.Math] ...38
  • 64. Secure AST customizer ... //  language  tokens  allowed tokensWhitelist  =  [ PLUS,  MINUS,  MULTIPLY,  DIVIDE,  MOD,  POWER,  PLUS_PLUS,  MINUS_MINUS,   COMPARE_EQUAL,  COMPARE_NOT_EQUAL,  COMPARE_LESS_THAN,  COMPARE_LESS_THAN_EQUAL,   COMPARE_GREATER_THAN,  COMPARE_GREATER_THAN_EQUAL ]   //  types  allowed  to  be  used  (including  primitive  types) constantTypesClassesWhiteList  =  [ Integer,  Float,  Long,  Double,  BigDecimal,   Integer.TYPE,  Long.TYPE,  Float.TYPE,  Double.TYPE ]   //  classes  who  are  allowed  to  be  receivers  of  method  calls receiversClassesWhiteList  =  [   Math,  Integer,  Float,  Double,  Long,  BigDecimal  ] } ...39
  • 65. Secure AST customizer You can build a subset of the Groovy syntax! ... //  language  tokens  allowed tokensWhitelist  =  [ PLUS,  MINUS,  MULTIPLY,  DIVIDE,  MOD,  POWER,  PLUS_PLUS,  MINUS_MINUS,   COMPARE_EQUAL,  COMPARE_NOT_EQUAL,  COMPARE_LESS_THAN,  COMPARE_LESS_THAN_EQUAL,   COMPARE_GREATER_THAN,  COMPARE_GREATER_THAN_EQUAL ]   //  types  allowed  to  be  used  (including  primitive  types) constantTypesClassesWhiteList  =  [ Integer,  Float,  Long,  Double,  BigDecimal,   Integer.TYPE,  Long.TYPE,  Float.TYPE,  Double.TYPE ]   //  classes  who  are  allowed  to  be  receivers  of  method  calls receiversClassesWhiteList  =  [   Math,  Integer,  Float,  Double,  Long,  BigDecimal  ] } ...39
  • 66. Secure AST customizer You can build a subset of the Groovy syntax! ... //  language  tokens  allowed tokensWhitelist  =  [ PLUS,  MINUS,  MULTIPLY,  DIVIDE,  MOD,  POWER,  PLUS_PLUS,  MINUS_MINUS,   COMPARE_EQUAL,  COMPARE_NOT_EQUAL,  COMPARE_LESS_THAN,  COMPARE_LESS_THAN_EQUAL,   COMPARE_GREATER_THAN,  COMPARE_GREATER_THAN_EQUAL ]   //  types  allowed  to  be  used  (including  primitive  types) constantTypesClassesWhiteList  =  [ Black / white list Integer,  Float,  Long,  Double,  BigDecimal,   Integer.TYPE,  Long.TYPE,  Float.TYPE,  Double.TYPE usage of classes ]   //  classes  who  are  allowed  to  be  receivers  of  method  calls receiversClassesWhiteList  =  [   Math,  Integer,  Float,  Double,  Long,  BigDecimal  ] } ...39
  • 67. Secure AST customizer • Ready to evaluate our flight equations! def  config  =  new  CompilerConfiguration() config.addCompilationCustomizers(imports,  secure) def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell(config)   shell.evaluate  cos  PI/3 • But the following would have failed: shell.evaluate  System.exit(0)40
  • 68. Back to our robot... robot.move  left41
  • 69. Back to our robot... Still need to get rid of the robot prefix! robot.move  left41
  • 70. Can we remove it?
  • 71. Yes !Can we remove it?
  • 72. How to get rid of the ‘robot’? • Instead of calling the move() method on the robot instance, we should be able to call the move() method directly from within the script • Two approaches • Inject a ‘move’ closure in • Use a base script class the binding with a method with a ‘move’ method pointer delegating to the robot43
  • 73. Inject a closure in the binding def  robot  =  new  mars.Robot() binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  robot,        *:  Direction.values()                        .collectEntries  {                                [(it.name()):  it]                        },        move:  robot.&move ])44
  • 74. Inject a closure in the binding def  robot  =  new  mars.Robot() binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  robot,        *:  Direction.values()                        .collectEntries  {                                [(it.name()):  it]                        }, Method pointer        move:  robot.&move (a closure) on ]) robot’s move instance method44
  • 75. Define a base script class abstract  class  RobotBaseScriptClass  extends  Script  {        void  move(Direction  dir)  {                def  robot  =  this.binding.robot                robot.move  dir        } }45
  • 76. Define a base script class abstract  class  RobotBaseScriptClass  extends  Script  {        void  move(Direction  dir)  {                def  robot  =  this.binding.robot                robot.move  dir        } } The move() method is now at the script level45
  • 77. Define a base script class abstract  class  RobotBaseScriptClass  extends  Script  {        void  move(Direction  dir)  {                def  robot  =  this.binding.robot                robot.move  dir        } } Access the robot The move() method is through the script’s now at the script level binding45
  • 78. Configure the base script class def  conf  =  new  CompilerConfiguration() conf.scriptBaseClass  =  RobotBaseScriptClass46
  • 79. Configure the base script class def  conf  =  new  CompilerConfiguration() conf.scriptBaseClass  =  RobotBaseScriptClass Scripts evaluated with this configuration will inherit from that class46
  • 80. Ready for lift off!    move  left
  • 81. Beep, beep...yes but how do you define the speed? ...beep...
  • 82. Oh no!
  • 83. What we could do now is... move  left,  at:  3.km/h50
  • 84. What we could do now is... Mix of named and normal parameters move  left,  at:  3.km/h50
  • 85. What we could do now is... Mix of named and normal parameters move  left,  at:  3.km/h How to support this speed notation?50
  • 86. Supporting the speed notation • We need to: – define units of distance, time and speed • DistanceUnit and Distance • TimeUnit and Duration • Speed – have a nice notation for them by adding properties to numbers – be able to define speed thanks to operator overloading51
  • 87. Distance unit enum and distance enum  DistanceUnit  {        centimeter  (cm,        0.01),        meter            (  m,        1      ),          kilometer    (km,  1000      )                  String  abbreviation        double  multiplier                DistanceUnit(String  abbr,  double  mult)  {                this.abbreviation  =  abbr                this.multiplier  =  mult          }        String  toString()  {  abbreviation  }   }52
  • 88. Distance unit enum and distance enum  DistanceUnit  { @TupleConstructor          centimeter  (cm,        0.01), class  Distance  {        meter            (  m,        1      ),          double  amount          kilometer    (km,  1000      )          DistanceUnit  unit                String  abbreviation        String  toString()  {          double  multiplier                "$amount  $unit"                  }          DistanceUnit(String  abbr,  double  mult)  { }                this.abbreviation  =  abbr                this.multiplier  =  mult          }        String  toString()  {  abbreviation  }   }52
  • 89. Time unit enum and duration enum  TimeUnit  {        hour            (    h,  3600),        minute        (min,      60),          second        (    s,        1)                  String  abbreviation        double  multiplier                TimeUnit(String  abbr,  double  mult)  {                this.abbreviation  =  abbr                this.multiplier  =  mult          }        String  toString()  {  abbreviation  }   }53
  • 90. Time unit enum and duration enum  TimeUnit  { @TupleConstructor          hour            (    h,  3600), class  Duration  {        minute        (min,      60),          double  amount          second        (    s,        1)          TimeUnit  unit                String  abbreviation        String  toString()  {          double  multiplier                "$amount  $unit"                  }          TimeUnit(String  abbr,  double  mult)  { }                this.abbreviation  =  abbr                this.multiplier  =  mult          }        String  toString()  {  abbreviation  }   }53
  • 91. Now at (light!) speed @TupleConstructor   class  Speed  { distance        Distance  distance speed =        Duration  dur duration        String  toString()  {                  "$distance/$dur"          }   }54
  • 92. First, we need the distance notation • We add a dynamic property to numbers by adding a getter to them and use the property notation shortcut: 2.km 2.getKm()55
  • 93. Techniques to add properties to numbers • To add dynamic methods or properties, there are several approaches at your disposal: – ExpandoMetaClass – custom MetaClass – Categories – Extension modules Groovy 2! • Let’s have a look at the ExpandoMetaClass56
  • 94. Using ExpandoMetaClass Number.metaClass.getCm  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.centimeter)   } Number.metaClass.getM  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.meter)   } Number.metaClass.getKm  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.kilometer)   }57
  • 95. Using ExpandoMetaClass Add that to integration.groovy Number.metaClass.getCm  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.centimeter)   } Number.metaClass.getM  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.meter)   } Number.metaClass.getKm  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.kilometer)   }57
  • 96. Using ExpandoMetaClass Add that to integration.groovy Number.metaClass.getCm  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.centimeter)   } Number.metaClass.getM  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.meter)   } Number.metaClass.getKm  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.kilometer)   } ‘delegate’ is the current number57
  • 97. Using ExpandoMetaClass Add that to integration.groovy Usage in your DSLs Number.metaClass.getCm  =  {  -­‐>          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.centimeter)   } Number.metaClass.getM  =  {  -­‐>   40.cm          new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.meter)   3.5.m } Number.metaClass.getKm  =  {  -­‐>   4.km        new  Distance(delegate,  Unit.kilometer)   } ‘delegate’ is the current number57
  • 98. Distance okay, but speed? • For distance, we just added a property access after the number, but we now need to divide (‘div’) by the time 2.km/h58
  • 99. Distance okay, but speed? • For distance, we just added a property access after the number, but we now need to divide (‘div’) by the time The div() method on Distance 2.km/h58
  • 100. Distance okay, but speed? • For distance, we just added a property access after the number, but we now need to divide (‘div’) by the time The div() method on Distance 2.km/h An ‘h’ duration instance in the binding58
  • 101. Inject the ‘h’ hour constant in the binding def  binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  new  Robot(),        *:  Direction.values()                        .collectEntries  {                                [(it.name()):  it]                        },        h:  new  Duration(1,  TimeUnit.hour) ])59
  • 102. Inject the ‘h’ hour constant in the binding def  binding  =  new  Binding([        robot:  new  Robot(),        *:  Direction.values()                        .collectEntries  { An ‘h’ duration added                                [(it.name()):  it] to the binding                        },        h:  new  Duration(1,  TimeUnit.hour) ])59
  • 103. Operator overloading a  +  b      //  a.plus(b) a  -­‐  b      //  a.minus(b) • Currency amounts a  *  b      //  a.multiply(b) – 15.euros + 10.dollars a  /  b      //  a.div(b) a  %  b      //  a.modulo(b) • Distance handling a  **  b    //  a.power(b) a  |  b      //  a.or(b) – 10.km - 10.m a  &  b      //  a.and(b) a  ^  b      //  a.xor(b) • Workflow, concurrency a[b]        //  a.getAt(b) – taskA | taskB & taskC a  <<  b    //  a.leftShift(b) a  >>  b    //  a.rightShift(b) • Credit an account a  >>>  b  //  a.rightShiftUnsigned(b) – account << 10.dollars +a            //  a.unaryPlus() account += 10.dollars -­‐a            //  a.unaryMinus() account.credit 10.dollars ~a            //  a.bitwiseNegate()60
  • 104. Operator overloading • Update the Distance class with a div() method following the naming convention for operators class  Distance  {        ...        Speed  div(Duration  t)  {                new  Speed(this,  t)        }        ... }61
  • 105. Operator overloading • Update the Distance class with a div() method following the naming convention for operators class  Distance  {        ...        Speed  div(Duration  t)  {                new  Speed(this,  t)        }        ... } Optional return61
  • 106. Equivalence of notation • Those two notations are actually equivalent: 2.km/h 2.getKm().div(h)62
  • 107. Equivalence of notation • Those two notations are actually equivalent: 2.km/h This one might be slightly more verbose! 2.getKm().div(h)62
  • 108. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h63
  • 109. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h Normal parameter63
  • 110. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h Normal Named parameter parameter63
  • 111. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h Normal Named parameter parameter Will call: def  move(Map  m,  Direction  q)63
  • 112. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h Normal Named parameter parameter Will call: def  move(Map  m,  Direction  q) All named parameters go into the map argument63
  • 113. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h Normal Named parameter parameter Will call: def  move(Map  m,  Direction  q) All named parameters go Positional parameters into the map argument come afterwards63
  • 114. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h64
  • 115. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h Can we get rid of the comma?64
  • 116. Named parameters usage move  left,  at:  3.km/h Can we get rid of What about the the comma? colon too?64
  • 117. Command chains Groovy 1.8 • A grammar improvement allowing you to drop dots & parens when chaining method calls – an extended version of top-level statements like println • Less dots, less parens allow you to – write more readable business rules – in almost plain English sentences • (or any language, of course)65
  • 118. Command chains  move  left    at  3.km/h  66
  • 119. Command chains Alternation of method names  move  left    at  3.km/h  66
  • 120. Command chains Alternation of method names  move  left    at  3.km/h   and parameters (even named ones)66
  • 121. Command chains  move  left    at  3.km/h  66
  • 122. Command chains Equivalent to:  move  left    at  3.km/h            (        ).    (            )66
  • 123. Look Ma!No parens, n odots!
  • 124. Command chains //  Java  fluent  API  approach class  Robot  {        ...        def  move(Direction  dir)  {                this.dir  =  dir                return  this        }        def  at(Speed  speed)  {                this.speed  =  speed                return  this        }        ... } 68
  • 125. Command chains def  move(Direction  dir)  {        [at:  {  Speed  speed  -­‐>                ...        }] } 69
  • 126. Command chains def  move(Direction  dir)  {        [at:  {  Speed  speed  -­‐> Nested maps                ... and closures        }] } 69
  • 127. Command chains def  move(Direction  dir)  {        [at:  {  Speed  speed  -­‐> Nested maps                ... and closures        }] } Usage in your DSLs move  left  at  3.km/h 69
  • 128. Command chains 70
  • 129. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) 70
  • 130. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor 70
  • 131. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation 70
  • 132. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good 70
  • 133. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures 70
  • 134. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {} 70
  • 135. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {} //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens 70
  • 136. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {} //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens select  all    unique()  from  names 70
  • 137. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {} //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens select  all    unique()  from  names //  possible  with  an  odd  number  of  terms 70
  • 138. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {} //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens select  all    unique()  from  names //  possible  with  an  odd  number  of  terms deploy  left    arm 70
  • 139. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor        (            ).        (                      ).      (            ) //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {} //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens select  all    unique()  from  names //  possible  with  an  odd  number  of  terms deploy  left    arm 70
  • 140. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor        (            ).        (                      ).      (            ) //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good          (                      ).            (        ) //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {} //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens select  all    unique()  from  names //  possible  with  an  odd  number  of  terms deploy  left    arm 70
  • 141. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor        (            ).        (                      ).      (            ) //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good          (                      ).            (        ) //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {}          (    ).        (    ).        (    ) //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens select  all    unique()  from  names //  possible  with  an  odd  number  of  terms deploy  left    arm 70
  • 142. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor        (            ).        (                      ).      (            ) //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good          (                      ).            (        ) //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {}          (    ).        (    ).        (    ) //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens select  all    unique()  from  names            (      ).                .        (          ) //  possible  with  an  odd  number  of  terms deploy  left    arm 70
  • 143. Command chains //  methods  with  multiple  arguments  (commas) take  coffee    with  sugar,  milk    and  liquor        (            ).        (                      ).      (            ) //  leverage  named-­‐args  as  punctuation check  that:  vodka    tastes  good          (                      ).            (        ) //  closure  parameters  for  new  control  structures given  {}    when  {}    then  {}          (    ).        (    ).        (    ) //  zero-­‐arg  methods  require  parens select  all    unique()  from  names            (      ).                .        (          ) //  possible  with  an  odd  number  of  terms deploy  left    arm            (        ). 70
  • 144. Final result71
  • 145. Final result move  forward  at  3.km/h71
  • 146. move forward at 3.km/h
  • 147. move forward at 3.km/h Yes! We did it!
  • 148. What aboutsecurity and safety?
  • 149. Security and Safety JVM Security Managers SecureASTCustomizer Sandboxing Controlling script execution© 2012 SpringOne 2GX. All rights reserved. Do not distribute without permission.
  • 150. Play it safe in a sandbox
  • 151. Playing it safe... • You have to think carefully about what DSL users are allowed to do with your DSL • Forbid things which are not allowed – leverage the JVM’s Security Managers • this might have an impact on performance – use a Secure AST compilation customizer • not so easy to think about all possible cases – avoid long running scripts with *Interrupt transformations76
  • 152. Security Managers • Groovy is just a language leaving on the JVM, so you have access to the usual Security Managers mechanism – Nothing Groovy specific here – Please check the documentation on Security Managers and how to design policy files77
  • 153. SecureASTCustomizer def  secure  =  new  SecureASTCustomizer() secure.with  { //  disallow  closure  creation      closuresAllowed  =  false   //  disallow  method  definitions      methodDefinitionAllowed  =  false   //  empty  white  list  =>  forbid  certain  imports      importsWhitelist  =  [...]        staticImportsWhitelist  =  [...] //  only  allow  some  static  import      staticStarImportsWhitelist  =  [...] //  language  tokens  allowed        tokensWhitelist  =  [...] //  types  allowed  to  be  used      constantTypesClassesWhiteList  =  [...] //  classes  who  are  allowed  to  be  receivers  of  method  calls      receiversClassesWhiteList  =  [...] } def  config  =  new  CompilerConfiguration() config.addCompilationCustomizers(secure) def  shell  =  new  GroovyShell(config)78
  • 154. Controlling code execution • Your application may run user’s code – what if the code runs in infinite loops or for too long? – what if the code consumes too many resources? • 3 new transforms at your rescue – @ThreadInterrupt: adds Thread#isInterrupted checks so your executing thread stops when interrupted – @TimedInterrupt: adds checks in method and closure bodies to verify it’s run longer than expected – @ConditionalInterrupt: adds checks with your own conditional logic to break out from the user code79
  • 155. @ThreadInterrupt @ThreadInterrupt import  groovy.transform.ThreadInterrupt     while  (true)  {        //  Any  extraterestrial  around? } 80
  • 156. @ThreadInterrupt @ThreadInterrupt import  groovy.transform.ThreadInterrupt       while  (true)  { {        if  (Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted())                throw  new  InterruptedException() }        //  Any  extraterestrial  around? } 80
  • 157. @TimedInterrupt @TimedInterrupt(10) import  groovy.transform.TimedInterrupt     while  (true)  {        move  left        //  circle  forever } • InterruptedException thrown when checks indicate code ran longer than desired81
  • 158. @ConditionalInterrupt • Specify your own conditions to be inserted at the start of method and closure bodies – check for available resources, number of times run, etc. • Leverages closure annotation parameters Groovy 1.8 @ConditionalInterrupt({  battery.level  <  0.1  }) import  groovy.transform.ConditionalInterrupt 100.times  {                move  forward  at  10.km/h }82
  • 159. @ConditionalInterrupt • Specify your own conditions to be inserted at the start of method and closure bodies – check for available resources, number of times run, etc. • Leverages closure annotation parameters Groovy 1.8 @ConditionalInterrupt({  battery.level  <  0.1  }) import  groovy.transform.ConditionalInterrupt Can we avoid typing the 100.times  {         conditional        move  forward  at  10.km/h interrupt? }82
  • 160. @ConditionalInterrupt • Specify your own conditions to be inserted at the start of method and closure bodies – check for available resources, number of times run, etc. • Leverages closure annotation parameters Groovy 1.8 Yes! Using compilation 100.times  {         customizers        move  forward  at  10.km/h }83
  • 161. Using compilation customizers • In our previous examples, the usage of the interrupts were explicit, and users had to type them – if they want to deplete the battery of your robot, they won’t use interrupts, so you have to impose interrupts yourself • With compilation customizers you can inject those interrupts thanks to the AST Transformation Customizer84
  • 162. What about tooling?
  • 163. Tooling Why tooling? DSL descriptors Pointcuts and contributions Packaging DSLDs© 2012 SpringOne 2GX. All rights reserved. Do not distribute without permission.
  • 164. Why tooling? • I know what this language means –why do I want anything more?87
  • 165. Why tooling? • I know what this language means –why do I want anything more? • But, tooling can make things even better –syntax checking –content assist –search –inline documentation87
  • 166. Let’s use an IDE • I hear Groovy-Eclipse is pretty good…88
  • 167. Let’s use an IDE • I hear Groovy-Eclipse is pretty good…88
  • 168. Let’s use an IDE • I hear Groovy-Eclipse is pretty good… Uh oh!88
  • 169. Let’s use an IDE • I hear Groovy-Eclipse is pretty good… Uh oh! Can we do better?88
  • 170. Of course! • Eclipse is extensible – with a plugin architecture Eclipse platform New WorkBench plugin Help JFace SWT New Team tool Workspace Platform runtime89
  • 171. I want my DSL supported in Eclipse90
  • 172. I want my DSL supported in Eclipse • Let’s create a plugin – create a plugin project – extend an extension point – write the code – build the plugin – host on an update site – convince people to install it90
  • 173. I want my DSL supported in Eclipse • Let’s create a plugin • Problems – create a plugin project – I don’t want to learn – extend an extension point Eclipse APIs – write the code – I want an easy way for users to – build the plugin install the DSL support – host on an update site – I need a specific plugin version for my specific DSL version – convince people to install it90
  • 174. I want my DSL supported in Eclipse Uh oh! • Let’s create a plugin • Problems – create a plugin project – I don’t want to learn – extend an extension point Eclipse APIs – write the code – I want an easy way for users to – build the plugin install the DSL support – host on an update site – I need a specific plugin version for my specific DSL version – convince people to install it90
  • 175. I want my DSL supported in Eclipse Uh oh! • Let’s create a plugin • Problems – create a plugin project – I don’t want to learn – extend an extension point Eclipse APIs – write the code – I want an easy way for users to – build the plugin install the DSL support – host on an update site – I need a specific plugin version for my specific DSL version – convince people to install it Can we do better?90
  • 176. Of course! • Groovy is extensible! – Meta-Object Protocol – Metaprogramming – DSLs...91
  • 177. DSL Descriptors • Teach the IDE about DSLs through a Groovy DSL92
  • 178. DSL Descriptors • Teach the IDE about DSLs through a Groovy DSL • Benefits – Powerful – Uses Groovy syntax, semantics, and APIs – No knowledge of Eclipse required – Can ship with Groovy libraries92
  • 179. DSL Descriptors • Teach the IDE about DSLs through a Groovy DSL • Benefits – Powerful DSL Descriptors (DSLD) – Uses Groovy syntax, semantics, and APIs – No knowledge of Eclipse required – Can ship with Groovy libraries92
  • 180. DSL Descriptors • Teach the IDE about DSLs through a Groovy DSL • Benefits – Powerful DSL Descriptors (DSLD) – Uses Groovy syntax, semantics, and APIs – No knowledge of Eclipse required – Can ship with Groovy libraries In IntelliJ. called GDSL92
  • 181. Let’s start simple move deploy h left right forward backward93
  • 182. Let’s start simple move • In English: deploy h – When the type is this, add the following properties/methods left • move, deploy, h, etc from binding right • Direction from import customizer forward backward93
  • 183. Let’s start simple move • In English: deploy h – When the type is this, add the following properties/methods left • move, deploy, h, etc from binding right • Direction from import customizer forward • In DSLD: backward – When the type is this contribute( isThisType() ) {…} – …properties/methods… property name: left, type: v11.Direction … method name: move, type: java.util.Map<…>93
  • 184. Let’s start simple move • In English: deploy h – When the type is this, add the following properties/methods left • move, deploy, h, etc from binding right • Direction from import customizer forward • In DSLD: Pointcut backward – When the type is this contribute( isThisType() ) {…} – …properties/methods… property name: left, type: v11.Direction … method name: move, type: java.util.Map<…>93
  • 185. Let’s start simple move • In English: deploy h – When the type is this, add the following properties/methods left • move, deploy, h, etc from binding right • Direction from import customizer forward • In DSLD: Pointcut backward – When the type is this Contribution contribute( isThisType() ) {…} block – …properties/methods… property name: left, type: v11.Direction … method name: move, type: java.util.Map<…>93
  • 186. DEMO LET’S SEE THAT94
  • 187. Anatomy of a DSLD script • Pointcuts – Where to do it – What is the current expression? – Current type? – Enclosing class? • Contribution blocks – What to do – « Add » method – « Add » property – Delegate to another type95
  • 188. Anatomy of a DSLD script • Pointcuts Where – Where to do it – What is the current expression? – Current type? – Enclosing class? • Contribution blocks – What to do – « Add » method – « Add » property – Delegate to another type95
  • 189. Anatomy of a DSLD script • Pointcuts Where – Where to do it – What is the current expression? – Current type? What – Enclosing class? • Contribution blocks – What to do – « Add » method – « Add » property – Delegate to another type95
  • 190. Anatomy of a DSLD script • Pointcuts Where – Where to do it – What is the current expression? – Current type? What – Enclosing class? • Contribution blocks – What to do – « Add » method Not at runtime... only while editing – « Add » property – Delegate to another type95
  • 191. Talking about « x » class  Other  {  } class  Foo  {        def  method()  {                def  x  =  new  Other()                x.nuthin        } }96
  • 192. Talking about « x » Current type class  Other  {  } class  Foo  {        def  method()  {                def  x  =  new  Other()                x.nuthin        } }96
  • 193. Talking about « x » Current type class  Other  {  } class  Foo  { Enclosing class        def  method()  {                def  x  =  new  Other()                x.nuthin        } }96
  • 194. Talking about « x » Current type class  Other  {  } class  Foo  { Enclosing class        def  method()  {                def  x  =  new  Other()                x.nuthin Enclosing method        } }96
  • 195. Pointcuts97
  • 196. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type97
  • 197. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type isScript()              //  matches  on  the  enclosing  script97
  • 198. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type isScript()              //  matches  on  the  enclosing  script currentType("groovy.dsl.Robot")97
  • 199. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type isScript()              //  matches  on  the  enclosing  script currentType("groovy.dsl.Robot") currentType(subType("groovy.dsl.Robot"))97
  • 200. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type isScript()              //  matches  on  the  enclosing  script currentType("groovy.dsl.Robot") currentType(subType("groovy.dsl.Robot")) currentType(method("move"))97
  • 201. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type isScript()              //  matches  on  the  enclosing  script currentType("groovy.dsl.Robot") currentType(subType("groovy.dsl.Robot")) currentType(method("move")) currentType(annotatedBy("groovy.dsl.Robotic"))97
  • 202. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type isScript()              //  matches  on  the  enclosing  script currentType("groovy.dsl.Robot") currentType(subType("groovy.dsl.Robot")) currentType(method("move")) currentType(annotatedBy("groovy.dsl.Robotic")) //  combining  them,  and  using  the  logical  and97
  • 203. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type isScript()              //  matches  on  the  enclosing  script currentType("groovy.dsl.Robot") currentType(subType("groovy.dsl.Robot")) currentType(method("move")) currentType(annotatedBy("groovy.dsl.Robotic")) //  combining  them,  and  using  the  logical  and isScript(        annotatedBy("groovy.dsl.Robotic")97
  • 204. Pointcuts currentType()        //  matches  on  current  declaring  type isScript()              //  matches  on  the  enclosing  script currentType("groovy.dsl.Robot") currentType(subType("groovy.dsl.Robot")) currentType(method("move")) currentType(annotatedBy("groovy.dsl.Robotic")) //  combining  them,  and  using  the  logical  and isScript(        annotatedBy("groovy.dsl.Robotic") )  &  currentType(method("move"))97
  • 205. What goes in a contribution block?98
  • 206. What goes in a contribution block? • property: “adds” a property – name: “myName” (REQUIRED) – type: “java.lang.String” – declaringType: ”com.foo.Frumble” – doc: “Some JavaDoc”98
  • 207. What goes in a contribution block? • property: “adds” a property – name: “myName” (REQUIRED) – type: “java.lang.String” – declaringType: ”com.foo.Frumble” – doc: “Some JavaDoc” • method: “adds” a method – all arguments above, and – params: [ firstName: “java.lang.String”, lastName: “java.lang.String” ] – namedParams, optionalParams98
  • 208. What goes in a contribution block? • property: “adds” a property – name: “myName” (REQUIRED) – type: “java.lang.String” – declaringType: ”com.foo.Frumble” – doc: “Some JavaDoc” • method: “adds” a method – all arguments above, and – params: [ firstName: “java.lang.String”, lastName: “java.lang.String” ] – namedParams, optionalParams • delegatesTo: “delegates” invocations to another type – type (REQUIRED)98
  • 209. What goes in a contribution block? • property: “adds” a property contribute(...)  { – name: “myName” (REQUIRED)    property  name:  "myName" – type: “java.lang.String”    method  name:  "getMyName" – declaringType: ”com.foo.Frumble”    delegatesTo  type:   – doc: “Some JavaDoc”            "some.other.Type" • method: “adds” a method } – all arguments above, and – params: [ firstName: “java.lang.String”, lastName: “java.lang.String” ] – namedParams, optionalParams • delegatesTo: “delegates” invocations to another type – type (REQUIRED)98
  • 210. Wait... isn’t this Aspect-Oriented Programming?99
  • 211. Wait... isn’t this Aspect-Oriented Programming? • Pointcut – Intentionally borrowed from AOP99
  • 212. Wait... isn’t this Aspect-Oriented Programming? • Pointcut – Intentionally borrowed from AOP • AspectJ: pointcuts and advice – operates on Java instructions at runtime99
  • 213. Wait... isn’t this Aspect-Oriented Programming? • Pointcut – Intentionally borrowed from AOP • AspectJ: pointcuts and advice – operates on Java instructions at runtime • DSLD: pointcuts and contribution blocks – operates on AST in the editor org.codehaus.groovy.ast.expr.*99
  • 214. Wait... isn’t this Aspect-Oriented Programming? • Pointcut – Intentionally borrowed from AOP • AspectJ: pointcuts and advice – operates on Java instructions at runtime • DSLD: pointcuts and contribution blocks – operates on AST in the editor org.codehaus.groovy.ast.expr.* • Join Point Model – Join points (e.g., instructions, expressions) – Mechanism for quantifying join points (e.g., pointcuts) – Means of affect at a join point (e.g., advice, contribution blocks)99
  • 215. DEMO LET’S GET THE EDITOR REALLY WORKING100
  • 216. How do we ship it? • jar/war file • DSLD file: – as source in dsld package • Hint: – Use script folder support in preferences – **/*.dsld to be copied to bin folder as source • Can also use maven or gradle101
  • 217. DEMO HOW DO WE SHIP IT?102
  • 218. To summarize: Editing support for DSLs DSLD contribution pointcuts blocks • Getting it out there – include a dsld package in your JAR – add the DSLD for your DSL to the package as source – ship it!103
  • 219. To summarize: Editing support for DSLs Where DSLD contribution pointcuts blocks • Getting it out there – include a dsld package in your JAR – add the DSLD for your DSL to the package as source – ship it!103
  • 220. To summarize: Editing support for DSLs Where DSLD contribution pointcuts blocks What • Getting it out there – include a dsld package in your JAR – add the DSLD for your DSL to the package as source – ship it!103
  • 221. What have we learnt?© 2012 SpringOne 2GX. All rights reserved. Do not distribute without permission.
  • 222. Groovy Power!™ • A flexible and malleable syntax – scripts vs classes, optional typing, colons and parens • Groovy offers useful dynamic features for DSLs – operator overloading, ExpandoMetaClass • Can write almost plain natural language sentences – for readable, concise and expressive DSLs • Groovy DSLs are easy to integrate, and can be secured to run safely in your own sandbox • Groovy DSLs can be tooled for improved authoring capabilities105
  • 223. Groovy Power!™ Groovy is a great fit for DSLs! • A flexible and malleable syntax – scripts vs classes, optional typing, colons and parens • Groovy offers useful dynamic features for DSLs – operator overloading, ExpandoMetaClass • Can write almost plain natural language sentences – for readable, concise and expressive DSLs • Groovy DSLs are easy to integrate, and can be secured to run safely in your own sandbox • Groovy DSLs can be tooled for improved authoring capabilities105
  • 224. And there’s more! • We haven’t dived into... – How to implement your own control structures with closures – How to create Groovy « builders » – How to define extension modules – How to hijack the Groovy syntax to develop our own language extensions with AST Transformations – Source preprocessing for custom syntax – How to use the other metaprogramming techniques available – How to improve error reporting with customizers106
  • 225. Thank you!107
  • 226. Questions & Answers Got questions, really?108
  • 227. Questions & Answers I might have answers! Got questions, really?108
  • 228. Image credits • Wikipedia logo: http://www.geekosystem.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/wikipedia-logo.png • Chains: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GXDVqUYSCa0/TVdBsON4tdI/AAAAAAAAAW4/EgJOUmAxB28/s1600/breaking-chains5_copy9611.jpg • Space odissey: http://dearjesus.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/2001_a_space_odyssey_1.jpg • HAL red: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-yjsyPxUFicY/TcazwAltOaI/AAAAAAAAAho/GVT7wGhnrUM/s1600/2001-a-space-odyssey-HAL.jpg • USSR Space posters: http://www.flickr.com/photos/justinvg • General: http://www.defense.gov/dodcmsshare/newsphoto/2009-02/hires_090217-D-7203C-004.jpg • Rocket: http://astro.vision.free.fr/download/fonds/7/saturn5c.jpg • Star Trek / 747: http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m35foiJI6a1qzz0iho1_1280.jpg • Man in space: http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/60130main_image_feature_182_jwfull.jpg • Sputnik 2: http://launiusr.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/sputnik2.jpg • Lunakod: http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/space/lunakhod_moscow.jpg • Sandbox: http://www.turnbacktogod.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/sandbox.jpg • Repair: http://www.oneangels.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/repair1.jpg • Mars rover: http://wallpapers.free-review.net/wallpapers/49/Mars_rover%2C_Mars_-_03.jpg • Mars rover 2: http://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/551038main_pia14156-43_946-710.jpg • Thumb: http://www.wpclipart.com/sign_language/thumbs_up_large.png.html • Night sky: http://www.aplf-planetariums.info/galeries/ciel_profond/2004-07-01-Voie_Lactee_Scorpion-Jean-Luc_PUGLIESI.jpg • Obama yes we can: http://www.dessinemoiunboulon.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/obama-yes-we-can_04-nov-08.jpg • Hook: http://winningware.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/FishHookXSmall.jpg • HP 48 GX: http://calculators.torensma.net/files/images/hewlett-packard_hp-48g.jpg • Omer: http://www.irmin.com/wallpaper/TV/Homer%20Simpson%20Oh%20No.jpg • Cadenat: http://acsgsecurite.com/upl/site/cadenat.png • Thanks: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hTdT5Ebk5ws/Tu_x2tE4ccI/AAAAAAAAAZc/pxtG8A0w7VE/s1600/thanks-digital-calligraphy-md.png • Buzz Aldrin: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-rpV5Oy5N78U/TprVli-2ZdI/AAAAAAAABN8/WiHob4rp2b8/s1600/Astronaut.jpg109