PRÉ VENTION DES INFECTIONS ET
GESTION DES DÉ CHETS
ADELINE LAURORE VILFORT
INFIRMIÈRE
ASSISTANT CHEF DE SERVICE DE
SUPERVI...
Objectif de la pré vention des
infections
Double rô le
 Réduire le risque de transmission des maladies
aux patients et à ...
Objectifs
CONCEPTS CLÉ S:
 Expliquer les principes
fondamentaux de la prévention des
infections
 Décrire le cycle de tra...
Le cycle de transmission de la maladie
 Tous les microorganismes
peuvent provoquer des
infections.
 Tous les humains son...
Transmission de HBV et du VIH
des patients au personnel de
santé
 La plupart des blessures peut
être évitée en:
 É limin...
Pré cautions standard
 Considérer chaque personne comme potentiellement infectée ou
susceptible d’être infectée.
 Se lav...
Il est recommandé de se laver les
mains :
 Avant d’examiner un patient
 Avant de porter des gants
 Après avoir manipulé...
Classification du risque potentiel
d’infection selon Spaulding
 Depuis 1968, ce système a été le fondement pour:
 Choisi...
Pré vention des infections chez
les patients et le personnel de
santé
 Principalement, elle comprend la prévention de la
...
Directives et
recommandations du CDC
pour l’isolementObjectifs :
 Introduites en 1996 pour remplacer les Précautions univ...
Directives et
recommandations du CDC
pour l’isolementComposantes clé s
 Reconnaissent l’importance de tous les liquides o...
Directives et recommandations
du CDC pour l’isolement
Composantes clé s (suite)
 Incorporent la plus grande partie des PU...
Pré cautions standard
 A employer pour les soins de tous les patients et clients qui
se rendent aux établissements de san...
Gestion des déchets
Buts
 Protéger des blessures les personnes qui
manipulent les déchets
 Prévenir la propagation des infections chez le
pe...
Dé chets
 80 – 85% des déchets des hô pitaux sont non
contaminés (papier, boites, récipients en
plastique).
 Traitement ...
Types de dé chets
Contaminés
Non-contaminés
Dangeureux
Tri
Production
de déchets
Tri sur le lieu
d’utilisation
~ 80 - 85% de déchets
usuels
~ 15 - 20% de déchets
contaminés ou
d...
É limination des dé chets
contaminé s
 Comment éliminer les objets tranchants et piquants :
 Tri sur le lieu d’utilisati...
É limination des dé chets
dangereux
 Déchets chimiques
 Récipients de produits chimiques vides
 Déchets pharmaceutiques...
Que pouvez-vous faire pour
amé liorer la gestion des
dé chets ?
EPP pendant la manipulation et
l’é limination des dé chets
Exposition accidentelle au sang
infecté par le VHB
Il ne faut pas plus de 10-8
ml (0,00000001
ml) de sang infecté par le V...
Ré sumé : La pré vention de
l’infection est la responsabilité de
tous
10-24
MERCI DE VOTRE
ATTENTION
MECI
Prochain SlideShare
Chargement dans…5
×

Prévention des infections et gestion des déchets

487 vues

Publié le

Présentation d'Adeline Laurore Vilfort

Publié dans : Formation
0 commentaire
0 j’aime
Statistiques
Remarques
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Aucun téléchargement
Vues
Nombre de vues
487
Sur SlideShare
0
Issues des intégrations
0
Intégrations
101
Actions
Partages
0
Téléchargements
3
Commentaires
0
J’aime
0
Intégrations 0
Aucune incorporation

Aucune remarque pour cette diapositive
  • As shown in this figure, a disease needs certain conditions in order to spread (be transmitted) to others:
    There must be an agent—something that can cause illness (virus, bacteria, etc.).
    The agent must have a place it can live (host or reservoir). Many microorganisms that cause disease in humans (pathogenic organisms) multiply in humans and are transmitted from person to person. Some are transmitted through contaminated food or water (typhoid), fecal matter (hepatitis A and other enteric viruses), or the bites of infected animals (rabies) and insects (malaria from mosquitoes).
    The agent must have the right environment outside the host to survive. After the microorganism leaves its host, it must have a suitable environment in which to survive until it infects another person. For example, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis can survive in sputum for weeks but will be killed by sunlight within a few hours.
    There must be a person who can catch the disease (susceptible host). People are exposed to disease-causing agents every day but do not always get sick. For a person to catch an infectious disease (e.g., mumps, measles or chicken pox,) s/he must be susceptible to that disease. The main reason most people do not catch the disease is that they have been previously exposed to it (e.g., vaccinated for it or previously had the disease) and their body’s immune system is now able to destroy the agents when they enter the body.
    An agent must have a way to move from its host to infect the next susceptible host.
  • This figure depicts the steps in the transmission of the hepatitis B (HBV) and human immunodeficiency (HIV) viruses from colonized persons (e.g., family planning client or pregnant woman attending an antenatal clinic) or patients to healthcare workers. Spread of these viruses from person to person can occur when staff (physician, nurse, or housekeeping personnel) are exposed to the blood or body fluids of an infected person (e.g., needlestick injury).
    Studies in the United States have shown that the risk of disease after exposure to HBV from a single needlestick injury ranges from 27–37% (Seeff et al 1978). The risk following a single needlestick exposure to HIV is much lower, 0.2–0.4% (Gerberding 1990; Gershon et al 1995), while the risk is 3–10% for HCV (Lanphear 1994). The rate of transmission of HIV is considerably lower than for HBV, probably because of the lower concentration of virus in the blood of HIV-infected persons.
    __________________________________________________________________________________________
    The efficiency for transmission of hepatitis B is high. For example, an accidental splash in the eye of as little as 10-8 ml (.00000001 ml) of infected blood can transmit HBV to a susceptible host (Bond et al 1982).
    __________________________________________________________________________________________
    In nearly all cases, transmission of HBV or HIV to health workers has occurred through preventable accidents such as puncture wounds. Transmission can also occur through mucous membrane contact, such as a splash of blood or amniotic fluid into the surgeon’s or assistant’s eye. Also, skin damaged by a cut, scrape, chapped skin, or contact dermatitis can be a point of entry for these viruses. While the risk of transmission is much lower from splashes of blood onto mucous membranes, they should be avoided. If splashing is anticipated, personal protective equipment such as face shields or glasses and plastic or rubber aprons, if available, is recommended. This protection is important because large mucous membrane exposures and prolonged skin contact may be associated with a higher risk of becoming infected (DHMH 1990).
    Finally, because it is not always possible to know in advance whether or not a person may be infected with HBV or HIV, contaminated instruments, needles, and syringes as well as other items from all persons (e.g., patients, pregnant women, and other clients) must be handled as if they are contaminated. This practice is consistent with the recommendations in the new Standard Precaution Guidelines discussed in the next section (Garner and HICPAC 1996). For example, several studies have highlighted the inability to distinguish HBV- or HIV-infected people from noninfected individuals on clinical grounds (Baker et al 1987; Handsfield, Cummings and Swenson 1987; Kelen et al 1988).
  • In 1968, Spaulding proposed three categories of potential infection risk to serve as the basis for selecting the prevention practice or process to use (e.g., sterilization of medical instruments, gloves, and other items) when caring for patients. This classification has stood the test of time and still serves as a good basis for setting priorities for any infection prevention program. The Spaulding categories are summarized below:
    Critical: These items and practices affect normally sterile tissues or the blood system and represent the highest level of infection risk. Failure to provide management of sterile or, where appropriate, high-level disinfected items (e.g., surgical instruments and gloves), is most likely to result in infections that are the most serious.
    Semicritical: These items and practices are second in importance and affect mucous membranes and small areas of nonintact skin. Management needs are considerable and require knowledge and skills in:
    Handling many invasive devices (e.g., gastrointestinal endoscopes and vaginal specula),
    Performing decontamination, cleaning, and high-level disinfection, and
    Gloving for personnel who touch mucous membranes and nonintact skin.
    Noncritical: Management of items and practices that involve intact skin and represent the lowest level of risk. Some (e.g., hand hygiene) are more important than others. Poor management of noncritical items, such as overuse of examination gloves, often consumes a major share of resources while providing only limited benefit.
  • Infectious (communicable) diseases are spread mainly in these ways:
    Airborne: Through the air (chicken pox or mumps).
    Blood or body fluids: If blood or body fluids contaminated with HBV or HIV comes in contact with another person, such as through a needlestick, s/he may become infected.
    Contact: Either direct (touching an open wound or draining pustule), or indirect (touching an object contaminated with blood or other body fluids).
    Fecal-oral: Swallowing food contaminated by human or animal feces (e.g., putting your fingers in your mouth after handling contaminated objects without first washing your hands).
    Foodborne: Eating or drinking contaminated food or liquid that contains bacteria or viruses (hepatitis A from eating raw oysters).
    Animal- or insect-borne: Contact with infected animals or insects through bites, scratches, secretions, or waste.
  • This new isolation precautions systems was developed to meet the following criteria:
    Be epidemiologically sound
    Recognize the pathogenic importance of all body fluids, secretions, and excretions (except sweat)
    Contain adequate precautions for infections transmitted by airborne, droplet, or contact routes
    Use new terms to avoid confusion with existing systems
    Be as simple and user-friendly as possible 
    __________
    Garner JS and The Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). 1996. Guideline for isolation precautions in hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 17(1): 53–80 and Am J Infect Control 24(1): 24–52.
  • This system involves a two-level approach—Standard Precautions and Transmission-Based Precautions—and was developed to accomplish the following:
    Incorporates the major features of both UP and BSI into a single set of precautions, called Standard Precautions, that are designed to be used in treating all clients and patients attending healthcare facilities regardless of their presumed diagnosis.
    Collapses the old disease-specific isolation categories into three sets of precautions based on routes of transmission, called Transmission-Based Precautions. (These guidelines apply to hospitalized patients or those in nursing homes or other types of extended care facilities.)
    Retains the recommendations that healthcare workers providing direct care, especially those working in surgical or obstetric units, should be immune to rubella, measles, mumps, varicella (chicken pox), and hepatitis A and B, as well as receive tetanus toxoid.
    __________
    Garner JS and The Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). 1996. Guideline for isolation precautions in hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 17(1): 53–80 and Am J Infect Control 24(1): 24–52.
  • Most people with bloodborne viral infections such as HIV and HBV do not have symptoms, nor can they be recognized as being infected. Standard Precautions are designed for use in caring for all people—both clients and patients—attending healthcare facilities. They apply to blood, all body fluids, secretions and excretions (except sweat), nonintact skin, and mucous membranes. Because no one really knows what organisms clients or patients may have at any time, it is essential that Standard Precautions be used all the time.
  • Diapositive facilitative. Peut servir de complément à la diapositive #10-6, “Le risque de VHB.”
  •  
    Nous savons que nous pouvons réduire le risque de contracter une infection en travaillant dans les soins de santé par l’utilisation de barrières et d’EPP pour faire de notre travail une affaire moins risquée.
     
  • Prévention des infections et gestion des déchets

    1. 1. PRÉ VENTION DES INFECTIONS ET GESTION DES DÉ CHETS ADELINE LAURORE VILFORT INFIRMIÈRE ASSISTANT CHEF DE SERVICE DE SUPERVISION DE LA QUALITÉ DES SOINS PROFESSEUR DE NURSING
    2. 2. Objectif de la pré vention des infections Double rô le  Réduire le risque de transmission des maladies aux patients et à la communauté  Protéger le personnel de santé de tous niveaux - des médecins aux infirmières en passant par le personnel de nettoyage, d’entretien et l’équipe de laboratoire
    3. 3. Objectifs CONCEPTS CLÉ S:  Expliquer les principes fondamentaux de la prévention des infections  Décrire le cycle de transmission des maladies et comment enrayer la propagation des maladies infectieuses  Expliquer le rô le des directives d’isolement du CDC pour prévenir les infections nosocomiales
    4. 4. Le cycle de transmission de la maladie  Tous les microorganismes peuvent provoquer des infections.  Tous les humains sont sensibles à la plupart des agents infectieux à moins d’être immunisés (naturellement ou par vaccination).  Le risque d’infection est proportionnel au nombre et à la virulence des organismes.  Le nombre d’organismes nécessaires pour provoquer une infection varie selon l’emplacement (courant sanguin —moindre ; peau intacte— le plus grand nombre de microorganismes).
    5. 5. Transmission de HBV et du VIH des patients au personnel de santé  La plupart des blessures peut être évitée en:  É liminant les injections inutiles et dangereuses  É liminant immédiatement les aiguilles et seringues dans des récipients résistants aux objets tranchants  Plaç ant le récipient à objets tranchants « à portée de main ».  Utilisant des zones de sécurité pour le passage des lames dans la salle d’opération.  Décontaminant les instruments et autres objets avant leur retraitement.
    6. 6. Pré cautions standard  Considérer chaque personne comme potentiellement infectée ou susceptible d’être infectée.  Se laver les mains avant et après chaque geste.  Porter des gants si nécessaire.  Utiliser des barrières de protection physiques  Utiliser des agents antiseptiques.  Utiliser des pratiques de travail saines.  Disposer de manière sûre les déchets infectieux.  Traiter les instruments, gants et autres matériels de faç on adéquate.
    7. 7. Il est recommandé de se laver les mains :  Avant d’examiner un patient  Avant de porter des gants  Après avoir manipulé des déchets ou touché des muqueuses, du sang ou des liquides corporels.  Après tout contact prolongé avec un patient.  Après avoir enlevé les gants.
    8. 8. Classification du risque potentiel d’infection selon Spaulding  Depuis 1968, ce système a été le fondement pour:  Choisir les pratiques de prévention des infections adéquates (par exemple, le port des gants ou la stérilisation des instruments médicaux), et  É tablir des priorités dans les programmes de prévention des infections.  Catégories du risque potentiel d’infection :  Critique: Gestion des objets et processus qui concernent les tissus normalement stériles et le système sanguin (niveau de risque d’infection le plus élevé)  Semi-critique: Gestion des objets et processus relatifs aux muqueuses ou aux petites surfaces de peau lésée.  Non critique: Gestion des objets et processus qui concernent la peau intacte (niveau de risque d’infection le plus faible)
    9. 9. Pré vention des infections chez les patients et le personnel de santé  Principalement, elle comprend la prévention de la propagation des maladies infectieuses par l’air, le sang ou les liquides organiques, par contact (fécal-oral, nourriture ou eau contaminées) et par des animaux ou insectes infectés par les moyens suivants :  Inhiber ou éliminer l’agent infectieux  Bloquer les moyens de l’agent de passer d’une personne infectée à un possible hô te  S’assurer que les personnes, en particulier le personnel de santé, sont immunisés ou vaccinés  Fournir au personnel de santé de l’équipement personnel de protection
    10. 10. Directives et recommandations du CDC pour l’isolementObjectifs :  Introduites en 1996 pour remplacer les Précautions universelles (PU 1985) et l’Isolement des substances corporelles (ISC 1987)  Réduire le risque de transmission des infections :  aux et des patients et clients qui utilisent les services de santé, et  au personnel de santé qui prend soin des patients.  É liminer la confusion concernant l’emploi de gants et l’hygiène des mains  Clarifier l’emploi de précautions supplémentaires pour prévenir la propagation de maladies par voie aérienne, par gouttelettes ou par contact  É liminer les lourdes, obsolètes et trop spécifiques précautions d’isolement.
    11. 11. Directives et recommandations du CDC pour l’isolementComposantes clé s  Reconnaissent l’importance de tous les liquides organiques, sécrétions et excrétions (excepté la transpiration)-et non uniquement le sang  S’appliquent à tous les patients et clients des établissements de santé  Intègrent les précautions adéquates pour les patients atteints d’infections transmises par voie aérienne, par gouttelettes ou par contact  Fournissent des conseils pour les patients suspectés atteints d’un processus infectieux mais sans diagnostique connu
    12. 12. Directives et recommandations du CDC pour l’isolement Composantes clé s (suite)  Incorporent la plus grande partie des PU et des ISC en un seul ensemble de précautions qui opère à deux niveaux:  Les précautions standard (premier niveau) concernent tous les patients et clients qui se rendent aux établissements de santé, et  Les précautions basées sur la transmission (second niveau) complètent les précautions standard et remplacent les catégories d’isolement spécifiques à chaque maladie en trois séries de précautions basées sur les voies de transmission (air, gouttelettes et contact)  Conservent les recommandations pour l’immunisation du personnel de santé
    13. 13. Pré cautions standard  A employer pour les soins de tous les patients et clients qui se rendent aux établissements de santé Raison: la plupart des personnes atteintes du VIH ou autre maladie mortelle transmise par le sang ne présente pas de symptô mes.  À employer pour le sang, tous les liquides organiques, sécrétions, excrétions (excepté la sueur), la peau lésée et les muqueuses  Raison: le risque d’exposition augmenté par le toucher, les blessures accidentelles (par aiguille) ou le contact (éclaboussures ou pulvérisation de sang ou liquides organiques potentiellement contaminés)
    14. 14. Gestion des déchets
    15. 15. Buts  Protéger des blessures les personnes qui manipulent les déchets  Prévenir la propagation des infections chez le personnel de santé qui manipule les déchets  Protéger l’environnement
    16. 16. Dé chets  80 – 85% des déchets des hô pitaux sont non contaminés (papier, boites, récipients en plastique).  Traitement habituel  15 – 20% seulement sont contaminés (sang, pus, les liquides organiques ainsi que tout parti) (vaccin périmés, conserve, mercure des thermomètres)
    17. 17. Types de dé chets Contaminés Non-contaminés Dangeureux
    18. 18. Tri Production de déchets Tri sur le lieu d’utilisation ~ 80 - 85% de déchets usuels ~ 15 - 20% de déchets contaminés ou dangereux
    19. 19. É limination des dé chets contaminé s  Comment éliminer les objets tranchants et piquants :  Tri sur le lieu d’utilisation  Options pour le traitement final  Comment éliminer les déchets liquides contaminés  Comment éliminer les déchets solides contaminés :  Incinération  Enfouissement  Incinération ouverte
    20. 20. É limination des dé chets dangereux  Déchets chimiques  Récipients de produits chimiques vides  Déchets pharmaceutiques  Déchets à forte contenance en métaux lourds  Autres
    21. 21. Que pouvez-vous faire pour amé liorer la gestion des dé chets ?
    22. 22. EPP pendant la manipulation et l’é limination des dé chets
    23. 23. Exposition accidentelle au sang infecté par le VHB Il ne faut pas plus de 10-8 ml (0,00000001 ml) de sang infecté par le VHB pour transmettre le virus du VHB à un hô te potentiel
    24. 24. Ré sumé : La pré vention de l’infection est la responsabilité de tous 10-24
    25. 25. MERCI DE VOTRE ATTENTION MECI

    ×