Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
Question 4 (2)
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Question 4 (2)

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  • Masaoka Shiki discovered the Haiku in Japan in the 19th to 20th century..[1] This is often represented by the juxtaposition of two images or ideas[2] and a kireji ("cutting word") between them, a kind of verbal punctuation mark which signals the moment of separation and colours the manner in which the juxtaposed elements are related.[3]Traditional haiku consist of 17 on (also known as morae), in three phrases of 5, 7 and 5 on respectively.[4] Any one of the three phrases may end with the kireji.[5] Although haiku are often stated to have 17 syllables,[6] this is incorrect as syllables and on are not the same.A kigo (seasonal reference), usually drawn from a saijiki, an extensive but defined list of such words. The majority of kigo, but not all, are drawn from the natural world. This, combined with the origins of haiku in pre-industrial Japan, has led to the inaccurate impression that haiku are necessarily nature poems.
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