Scientific Writing for Impact Factor Journals
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Scientific Writing for Impact Factor Journals

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The basics of scientific writing in the digital age. From the book Scientific Writing for Impact Factor Journals, Nova Publishers. This presentation distillates the main points that scientists......

The basics of scientific writing in the digital age. From the book Scientific Writing for Impact Factor Journals, Nova Publishers. This presentation distillates the main points that scientists should have in mind when writing a scientific article: Novelty, Communication, Focus, Distillation, Micro-Article, Unexpected, Contrast, Text, Clear, Introduction, Images, Photos, Iphone, Rejected, Social Media.

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  • 1. Scientific Writingfor ImpactFactor JournalsEric LICHTFOUSEChief Editor. Lecturer, Scientific WritingContact: Eric.Lichtfouse@dijon.inra.fr
  • 2. READTHE BOOKTO TRANSFORMYOUR CAREERClick here
  • 3. FOREWORDBut in science the credit goes tothe man who convinces the world,not to the man to whom the ideafirst occurs.Sir Francis Darwin
  • 4. WHAT IS A GOODSCIENTIFIC ARTICLE?CommunicationNovelty
  • 5. FOCUSToo much information kills information10 results 1 result
  • 6. DISTILLATIONBefore writing‘distillate’ your resultsto keep only 2-3 trendsthat show an advanceversus existingknowledge.
  • 7. MICRO-ARTICLESelect your bestresult from your toomany results usingthe micro-article.‘Micro-article: great layout. Great tofocus thinking, clarify goods of articleand work for improved impact’PhD student
  • 8. NOVELTYHow to select the new result?Think of:• Initial hypothesis• Hypothesis reformulation• Lab seminar• Meeting poster, oral• Scientists outside your field• Coffee breaks and friends
  • 9. UNEXPECTEDThe novelty isprobably not whatyou planned.Be prepared for‘anomalous’ andunexpected results.Be curious.
  • 10. CONTRASTDesign general andscientific issues(the problem) fittedto the findings:the solutionABSTRACTProblemSolution
  • 11. TEXTThe mind memorizes better titlesand first/last sentences.Write them wisely.
  • 12. CLEARIf you can’t explain somethingsimply, you don’t understand itwell.Albert Einstein• Do not make science ‘secret’• Do not use complicated wordsto look ‘serious’• Editors hate abbreviations
  • 13. INTRODUCTION‘Dive’ from general,societal issues intospecific, scientificissues.......
  • 14. IMAGESDraw imagesshowing imaginationImages communicate100 times betterthan textSpecies evolution treeCharles Darwin
  • 15. PHOTOSUse photosAnd videos
  • 16. IPHONEClever figuresmake thedifference onsmartphonesand tablets
  • 17. REJECTED?If your article isrejected, improve andresubmit!For 90% submissionsthe problem is NOTnovelty, it is theexplanation of novelty
  • 18. SOCIAL MEDIAShare yourfindings…And get cited
  • 19. READTHE BOOKTO TRANSFORMYOUR CAREERClick hereContact: Eric.Lichtfouse@dijon.inra.fr