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Rs mas 2018 to_post_web_final

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2018 Metro Atlanta Speaks Regional Snapshot summary of results

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Rs mas 2018 to_post_web_final

  1. 1. Perceptions of Life in Metro Atlanta Jim Skinner jskinner@atlantaregional.org November 2018
  2. 2. 2018 Headlines Transportation stays the #1 concern, with a greater share over 2017 Transit support remains strong • 50 percent of respondents would be willing to pay more in taxes to expand public transit • Nearly 48 percent of respondents chose “expand public transit” as the best long-term fix to traffic challenges, which is the highest percentage in the five years of asking this question Economy is getting better and better • Drops to 6% as biggest problem, down from 24% in 2013 Economy not improving for everyone equally • Some 26 percent of respondents would struggle paying for an unexpected financial emergency of $400 • Almost 17 percent of respondents reported that they skip meals due to lack of money Concern over crime jumps back up • In 2017, only 17 percent chose Crime as the #1 concern. Jumped back up to 22% in 2018 (on par with 2016). Housing Affordability a major concern
  3. 3. Transportation
  4. 4. 5% 3% 6% 5% 8% 6% 7% 9% 22% 28% 2% 4% 6% 4% 6% 24% 3% 13% 17% 21% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Race Relations DK Taxes Public Health Other Economy Human Services Public Education Crime Transportation 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 Biggest Problem Facing Residents of Metro Atlanta 2013-2018 “Transportation” remains the top concern of the 5,400+ respondents to the 2018 Metro Atlanta Speaks survey.
  5. 5. Most Likely to Say that Transportation is the #1 Issue? • Residents of Cherokee, Gwinnett, and Cobb • Males • White Respondents • Younger residents (18-34) • Those with at least a bachelor’s degree • Those with higher incomes
  6. 6. Change in Perceptions of the Region’s Biggest Problem – 2013-2018 While “transportation” has remained the top concern for the last four years, the decline of “economy” as a concern has been the biggest change over the history of the survey. In 2013, almost 25 percent of respondents chose “economy” as the top concern. This year, only six percent chose economy – the same percentage as those choosing “taxes.” 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Economy Human Services Public Education Crime Transportation
  7. 7. Biggest Problem for Metro Atlanta, by Jurisdiction (2018, Sorted by “Transportation” Responses) 10.8% 17.8% 18.7% 19.8% 22.0% 22.3% 23.1% 25.1% 26.5% 28.2% 30.2% 30.3% 31.0% 42.4% 28.2% 10.0% 3.5% 4.5% 5.5% 4.3% 7.3% 6.3% 6.6% 5.7% 4.9% 3.8% 5.5% 3.3% 4.9% 11.2% 6.3% 6.2% 4.5% 5.3% 4.5% 8.8% 4.6% 5.0% 4.8% 5.7% 8.3% 5.5% 5.3% 6.0% 34.5% 29.8% 23.4% 25.3% 26.0% 29.3% 23.3% 28.9% 30.0% 25.4% 21.6% 20.6% 13.5% 18.8% 21.9% 2.8% 5.3% 5.7% 3.5% 6.8% 4.5% 3.5% 2.8% 5.8% 3.3% 7.4% 3.5% 9.5% 3.3% 5.4% 10.0% 14.5% 13.5% 14.3% 11.5% 7.5% 9.8% 9.9% 10.8% 10.3% 9.1% 7.8% 7.5% 6.8% 9.4% 4.8% 7.5% 9.5% 8.5% 7.0% 9.3% 6.5% 10.4% 7.0% 8.5% 5.7% 6.0% 7.5% 5.5% 7.2% 5.6% 4.3% 9.2% 8.5% 4.0% 2.5% 3.5% 4.6% 3.8% 5.7% 5.7% 5.3% 7.8% 4.8% 5.8% 8.0% 5.8% 4.5% 4.0% 6.8% 10.0% 12.5% 6.1% 4.8% 5.8% 8.1% 10.8% 8.8% 6.5% 7.9% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Butts Clayton Douglas Paulding Coweta Fayette Henry City of Atlanta Rockdale Fulton DeKalb Cobb Gwinnett Cherokee ARC Region Transp Race Relations Economy Crime Public Health Public Education Human Services Taxes Other DK
  8. 8. "I Frequently Lack Transportation to Get to Places I Need to Go...” (2018) Don’t Know, 1.7% Strongly Agree, 11.5% Agree, 18.4% Disagree, 35.9% Strongly Disagree, 32.5% 29.9% Overall, roughly 30 percent of respondents indicated that they frequently lack transportation to get where they need to go.
  9. 9. 11.5% 11.0% 20.2% 15.5% 16.1% 12.4% 7.5% 12.0% 11.5% 11.5% 11.5% 10.0% 7.8% 8.8% 3.8% 18.4% 30.2% 20.2% 22.7% 14.9% 16.1% 20.9% 16.0% 16.2% 15.0% 13.5% 14.3% 16.5% 13.8% 16.3% 35.9% 33.7% 35.1% 31.8% 36.3% 31.3% 39.9% 30.3% 39.9% 30.5% 38.3% 32.8% 38.3% 38.8% 38.3% 32.5% 22.9% 23.7% 27.8% 31.3% 38.6% 29.7% 40.1% 31.7% 41.0% 34.1% 40.5% 36.5% 36.5% 39.8% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% ARC Region Clayton City of Atlanta DeKalb Fulton Butts Gwinnett Henry Rockdale Cherokee Douglas Paulding Cobb Coweta Fayette Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree DK "I Frequently Lack Transportation to Get to Places I Need to Go...” by Jurisdiction, 2018 (Sorted by Strongly Agree + Agree Responses) Overall, roughly 30 percent of respondents indicated that they frequently lack transportation to get where they need to go, but in jurisdictions like Clayton County (41.2%), the City of Atlanta (40.4%), and DeKalb County (38.2%), those percentages are significantly higher.
  10. 10. Most Likely to Indicate Having Problems with Accessing Needed Transportation… • Residents of the City of Atlanta, Clayton, and DeKalb • Boomers and Seniors • Those with lower levels of education • Black and Latino Respondents
  11. 11. Importance of Public Transit (2017-2018) 1.6% 4.8% 19.6% 74.1% 0.9% 6.3% 19.8% 73.0% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% DK Not important at all Somewhat important Very important 2018 2017 Overall support for public transit remains high as nearly 94 percent of respondents said that public transit was either “Very Important” or “Somewhat Important” for the future of metro Atlanta.
  12. 12. Importance of Public Transit to the Region (2018) 54.4% 54.6% 60.4% 61.9% 63.8% 65.6% 66.3% 68.3% 71.1% 76.9% 77.8% 79.2% 81.5% 82.0% 73.0% 21.1% 24.8% 25.2% 24.8% 23.0% 24.7% 23.8% 25.3% 17.5% 19.2% 15.8% 13.5% 15.3% 15.2% 19.8% 22.8% 19.3% 13.2% 11.8% 12.3% 9.2% 9.0% 5.8% 8.2% 2.8% 6.5% 7.0% 1.3% 1.5% 6.3% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Douglas Paulding Butts Coweta Fayette Cherokee Henry Gwinnett Rockdale Fulton Cobb Clayton DeKalb City of Atlanta ARC Region Very Important Somewhat Important Not Important At All DK 73 percent of respondents indicated that public transit was “very important” to the region, but in jurisdictions like the City of Atlanta (82%) and DeKalb County (81.5%), those percentages are significantly higher.
  13. 13. Best Way to Fix Traffic? (2017-2018) 4.1% 4.1% 15.6% 27.4% 48.8% 4.1% 5.5% 15.1% 27.6% 47.7% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% DK Do nothing Develop communities live close to work Improve roads/ highways Expand public transit 2018 2017 Nearly half of respondents felt that expanding public transit was the “best way to fix traffic,” while another quarter of respondents felt improving roads & highways were the best traffic fix.
  14. 14. 20.0% 35.1% 36.3% 39.6% 41.3% 42.5% 43.3% 44.5% 47.5% 48.9% 49.2% 49.8% 50.3% 55.0% 47.6% 49.2% 45.4% 37.5% 38.6% 34.0% 28.3% 28.5% 31.0% 29.0% 24.9% 29.8% 29.0% 24.2% 17.2% 27.6% 16.8% 15.5% 16.5% 12.3% 15.8% 15.8% 16.3% 12.8% 13.3% 20.2% 15.7% 10.8% 18.8% 15.7% 15.1% 6.0% 1.3% 6.8% 4.3% 3.3% 9.0% 3.0% 7.3% 6.5% 3.2% 2.5% 5.0% 3.7% 8.9% 5.5% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Butts Douglas Clayton Paulding Henry Fayette Cherokee Coweta Gwinnett Rockdale City of Atlanta Cobb Fulton DeKalb ARC Region Expand Public Transit Improve Roads and Highways Develop Communities in Which People Live Close to Where They Work Do Nothing DK Nearly half of respondents indicated that expanding public transit is the best long-term solution to traffic, with most of the region’s counties following the same trend. However, nearly half of the respondents from Butts (49.2%) and Douglas (45.4%) counties, felt improving roads and highways was the best long-term solution. Best Long-term Solution to Traffic? (2018)
  15. 15. Most Likely to Indicate “Expanding Public Transit” as the Best Long-Term Fix to Traffic Problems… • Residents of City of Atlanta, DeKalb, and Clayton • Females • Minorities • Those in Labor Force • Higher Educational Attainment
  16. 16. Almost half of respondents indicated that they are willing to pay more in taxes to expand public transit that includes buses and rail. Strongly Agree, 15.4% Agree, 34.5%Disagree, 26.0% Strongly Disagree, 22.4% DK, 1.6% “I am Willing to Pay More in Taxes to Fund Expanded Regional Public Transit that Includes Buses and Rail.” (2018)
  17. 17. 20.7% 36.0% 37.5% 38.5% 39.8% 39.9% 42.9% 45.5% 47.3% 49.4% 49.9% 50.3% 56.3% 58.5% 59.6% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Butts Paulding Douglas Henry Cherokee Coweta Fayette Clayton Rockdale Cobb 13 Co Gwinnett Fulton DeKalb City of Atlanta “I am Willing to Pay More in Taxes to Fund Expanded Regional Public Transit that Includes Buses and Rail.” (2018, Strongly Agree or Agree, by Jurisdiction) Overall, nearly 50 percent of respondents were willing to pay higher taxes for expanded regional transit, with respondents from the City of Atlanta (59.6%), DeKalb (58.5%) and Fulton (56.3%) counties showing the greatest willingness to pay.
  18. 18. More likely to be willing to pay more taxes to fund expanded regional transit… • Residents of the City of Atlanta, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett • Younger cohorts –58% willing in 18-34 age group –Down to 37% for age 65+ • More highly educated • Residents newer to the metro area (<10 years) • Renters
  19. 19. Economy
  20. 20. Percent of Respondents Choosing “Economy” As Region’s Biggest Problem (2013-2018) 24% 20% 15% 12% 9% 6% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 As the economy continues to improve, so the perception of the “Economy” drops as a top concern. In 2013, the “Economy” was the chosen as the #1 concern. In 2018, it is #6 (tied with “Taxes”).
  21. 21. Most Likely to Say the Economy is the #1 Issue? • Residents of Butts, Henry, and Cobb • Those aged 18-34 • Minorities • Those with lower incomes (but not those with lower education levels) • Those of Workforce Age, but out of the Workforce
  22. 22. Methods of Paying for a $400 Financial Emergency (2016-2018) 52.0% 19.3% 9.1% 4.2% 13.1% 2.3% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Pay with Cash, Check or Debit Pay with Credit Card Would Borrow Money Would Sell or Pawn Something Would Not Be Able to Pay Now Don't Know 2016 2017 2018 In 2018, over half of respondents indicated they would be able to pay for an emergency with cash, check, or debit, the other half of respondents would not have resources on hand to pay. Nearly 20 percent would need to rely on credit, and another 13 percent would not be able to pay at all.
  23. 23. 52.0% 61.0% 57.1% 58.5% 52.5% 50.5% 51.8% 59.1% 55.6% 52.1% 52.5% 51.9% 45.6% 48.0% 39.0% 19.3% 21.3% 22.8% 18.8% 19.5% 20.8% 18.9% 12.5% 15.2% 17.2% 15.3% 15.2% 22.0% 6.0% 19.5% 9.1% 3.0% 6.0% 6.0% 9.0% 8.8% 7.6% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 16.8% 7.3% 13.8% 12.0% 10.8% 4.2% 3.5% 3.3% 4.3% 4.8% 4.8% 3.3% 3.7% 6.0% 5.0% 5.3% 3.8% 4.8% 6.3% 13.1% 8.0% 9.0% 10.0% 12.8% 13.0% 15.0% 12.3% 14.2% 15.0% 7.8% 18.0% 13.3% 20.4% 21.8% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 13-County Region Fayette Cherokee Cobb Gwinnett Henry Fulton Paulding Rockdale Coweta Douglas City of Atlanta DeKalb Butts Clayton Pay with Cash, Check or Debit Pay with Credit Card Would Borrow Money Would Sell or Pawn Something Would Not Be Able to Pay Now DK $400 Emergency by Jurisdiction (2018) Like the region as a whole, in the majority of jurisdictions nearly half of respondents would be able to pay for an emergency with cash/debit. However, Clayton and Butts counties saw fewer residents able to pay with cash/credit, and over 20 percent of residents not able to pay at all.
  24. 24. Skipped Meals or Reduced Portions Due to Lack of Money (2018) Yes, 16.6% No, 83.2% DK, 0.2% Overall, over 16 percent of respondents in the region reported skipping meals or reducing portions due to a lack of money.
  25. 25. Skipped Meals or Reduced Portions by Jurisdiction (2018) 16.6% 26.1% 23.5% 22.0% 18.9% 19.1% 16.8% 15.8% 15.8% 15.3% 15.3% 13.3% 11.0% 11.0% 9.3% 83.2% 73.4% 76.5% 77.2% 80.7% 80.7% 83.3% 83.8% 84.0% 84.8% 84.8% 86.7% 88.8% 89.0% 90.2% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% ARC Region City of Atlanta Clayton Butts Fulton DeKalb Rockdale Henry Coweta Cobb Gwinnett Douglas Paulding Fayette Cherokee Yes No DK While overall roughly 17 percent of the respondents in the region reported skipping meals or reducing portions for financial reasons, in the City of Atlanta (26.1%), Clayton (23.5%) and Butts (22.0%) counties, nearly one-quarter (or more) residents reported doing so.
  26. 26. Most Likely to Experience Stress from Food Insecurity? • Residents of City of Atlanta, Clayton, Butts, DeKalb, and Fulton • Those aged 18-34 –6% at 65+ • Minorities • Those with lower incomes and education levels –4 in 10 at < $25K
  27. 27. Crime
  28. 28. Crime as Biggest Problem Facing Residents in Metro Atlanta: Shares - 2013-2018 After falling to 17 percent in 2017, “Crime” has again begin cited as a top concern in 2018, increasing to 22 percent (on par with 2016 levels). 17% 14% 17% 23% 17% 22% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
  29. 29. Most Likely to Say that Crime is the #1 Issue? • Residents of Butts, Rockdale, Clayton, and Fayette • Seniors/ Retired • Those with the least amount of education • Black Respondents • South of I-20 • Owners
  30. 30. 21.1% 15.4% 8.5% 17.0% 15.8% 20.7% 14.5% 22.4% 20.3% 15.3% 18.3% 21.0% 26.8% 37.8% 37.4% 42.4% 29.9% 40.0% 34.6% 41.8% 39.3% 46.3% 44.4% 47.0% 52.3% 49.3% 48.8% 44.5% 39.8% 45.1% 25.6% 33.7% 29.8% 33.6% 29.3% 25.6% 27.3% 22.8% 25.5% 21.8% 24.8% 20.5% 23.0% 16.0% 14.2% 9.7% 19.0% 21.8% 14.0% 12.3% 12.5% 11.5% 9.6% 6.3% 9.5% 6.5% 9.5% 4.5% 3.5% 3.0% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 13-County Region City of Atlanta Clayton DeKalb Douglas Fulton Rockdale Butts Cobb Henry Paulding Coweta Gwinnett Fayette Cherokee Excellent Good Fair Poor DK Resident Safety Ratings by Jurisdiction, 2018 Across the region, the majority of respondents rated resident safety in their community as “excellent” or “good.” However, two jurisdictions (City of Atlanta and Clayton County), more than half of respondents rated their community’s safety as “fair” or “poor.”
  31. 31. Housing
  32. 32. Metro Affordability “As Place to Live” (2017-2018) 2.9% 22.5% 36.5% 31.3% 6.8% 2.5% 24.0% 35.0% 31.1% 7.5% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% DK Poor Fair Good Excellent 2018 2017 Across the region, nearly 40 percent of respondents rated metro Atlanta’s affordability as excellent or good
  33. 33. Biggest Reason Paying Too Much for Housing (2018) 25.1% 20.8% 24.1% 15.5% 25.3% 23.0% 24.8% 22.5% 25.8% 29.7% 25.0% 24.2% 22.8% 19.5% 30.6% 17.3% 15.6% 15.0% 23.3% 19.8% 16.5% 15.7% 14.8% 15.0% 19.4% 14.5% 16.0% 12.0% 21.0% 18.9% 15.4% 9.6% 15.3% 23.8% 15.8% 16.0% 19.1% 17.8% 5.3% 12.8% 14.5% 11.7% 12.0% 16.5% 13.8% 14.2% 5.2% 7.3% 12.0% 17.3% 11.8% 12.9% 10.8% 23.5% 10.9% 22.0% 9.0% 8.8% 8.8% 4.7% 10.7% 15.2% 17.5% 5.0% 9.3% 11.0% 12.1% 9.8% 12.8% 10.0% 9.3% 13.5% 17.0% 13.0% 11.6% 10.4% 23.6% 7.0% 12.5% 6.3% 13.5% 12.5% 14.3% 10.5% 9.8% 8.8% 16.5% 16.0% 14.5% 13.2% 5.1% 8.0% 11.3% 7.0% 4.5% 6.8% 9.5% 5.3% 5.4% 4.3% 5.0% 5.3% 5.0% 4.2% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 13-County Region Butts Cherokee Clayton Cobb Coweta DeKalb Douglas Fayette Fulton Gwinnett Henry Paulding Rockdale City of Atlanta Quality of Location Quality of Neighborhood Lack of Affordable Housing Quality of Local Schools Not Paying More Than They Should Quality of Housing DK Other Reasons Across the region, respondents felt “Quality of Location” was the biggest reason they were paying too much for housing, followed closely by “Quality of Neighborhood.” Cherokee, Clayton, DeKalb, and Douglas counties cited a “Lack of Affordable Housing” as a key contributor to rising housing costs, while Fayette County respondents cited the “Quality of Local Schools.”
  34. 34. Importance of Factors in Housing Choice (2018) Overall, “Neighborhood Safety,” “Schools,” “Rent/Mortgage Affordability,” and a “Child-Friendly Environment” were cited by respondents as the most important factors in housing their choice. 88.0% 66.3% 53.6% 66.2% 69.6% 31.4% 10.0% 23.7% 35.9% 17.3% 13.4% 27.8% Nhood Safety Rent/Mortgage (Aff) Shopping Access ChildFriendly Envirn Schools Public Transportation Very Important Somewhat Important Not important at all DK
  35. 35. The Future
  36. 36. Future Assessment of Living Conditions (2017-2018) 2.1% 26.0% 29.6% 42.3% 2.0% 26.6% 27.7% 43.7% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% DK Worse in 3-4 years Better in 3-4 years About the same 2018 2017 Overall, nearly three-quarters of respondents believe that future living conditions will be the same or better in 3-4 years
  37. 37. Things in the Future Will Be… by County, 2018 (Sorted by Percent of Respondents Choosing “Better”) One thing that has remained fairly consistent over the six years of this survey is that respondents in lower-income jurisdictions like City of Atlanta, Clayton and DeKalb have among the highest levels of optimism for the next 3-4 years. 17.8% 22.0% 22.6% 24.0% 24.0% 25.3% 25.3% 25.5% 25.5% 26.0% 31.0% 31.2% 33.2% 41.8% 27.7% 28.8% 33.6% 31.3% 30.3% 37.3% 26.3% 28.5% 23.8% 32.0% 26.8% 26.8% 29.9% 21.2% 17.2% 26.6% 48.8% 39.2% 43.6% 44.3% 37.3% 46.3% 46.0% 49.5% 40.0% 45.5% 40.3% 37.2% 42.6% 39.0% 43.7% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Douglas Butts Coweta Cobb Henry Fayette Paulding Gwinnett Rockdale Cherokee DeKalb Clayton Fulton City of Atlanta ARC Region Better in 3-4 years Worse in 3-4 years About the Same DK
  38. 38. Most Likely to Say That Things Will Be Better in 3-4 Years • Residents of City of Atlanta, Fulton and Clayton • Millennials • Blacks and Latinos • Highest- Income Households and Lowest- Income Households • Those recently moving to the region
  39. 39. Explore the 2018 MAS Tableau Dashboard
  40. 40. 2018 Sponsors

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