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Blockchain for Beginners
Bryan Ford
Decentralized/Distributed Systems (DEDIS)
What is a Blockchain?
In essence, a blockchain is:
● A distributed ledger
● A consensus protocol
● A membership protocol
How to track wealth
(or anything)?
Things
● Gold, beads, cash...
Ledgers
● Who owns what?
Precedent: the Rai Stones of Yap
Stone “coins” weighing
thousands of kilograms
● Left in place once
created (“mined”)
● Ow...
Alice 5 BTC
Bob 2 BTC
Charlie 3 BTC
...
Distributed Ledgers
Problem: we don't want to trust any designated,
centralized au...
The Basic Goal: to Distribute Trust
“weakest-link”
security
“strongest-link”
security in a
small group
“strongest-link”
se...
The Bitcoin Blockchain
The Power of Distributed Ledgers
Can represent a distributed electronic record of:
● Who owns how much currency? (Bitcoin)...
What is a Blockchain?
In essence, a blockchain is:
● A distributed ledger
● A consensus protocol
● A membership protocol
Blockchains Require Consensus
Replicating a (fixed) ledger is
actually easy…
● Decades-old technology:
e.g., gossip protoc...
Nakamoto Consensus
Public blockchains such as Bitcoin, Ethereum use
consensus by crypto-lottery
1) Miners print their own ...
Drawbacks of Nakamoto Consensus
● Transaction delay
– Any transaction takes ~10 mins minimum in Bitcoin
● Weak consistency...
Scaling Blockchains is Not Easy
Blockchain Scaling Approaches
Avoid the problem:
● Move more work off-blockchain (Bitcoin)
– Shifts burdens onto users, “t...
The Problem with “Off-Blockchain”...
Even if the blockchain is secure, your money isn't!
● The only convenient/feature-ric...
ByzCoin: Fast, Scalable Blockchains
DEDIS lab project presented in [USENIX Security ‘16]
● Permanent transaction commitmen...
What is a Blockchain?
In essence, a blockchain is:
● A distributed ledger
● A consensus protocol
● A membership protocol
Who Participates in Consensus?
Permissionless blockchains (Bitcoin, Ethereum):
“anyone” who invests in solving crypto-puzz...
Environmental Costs
Proof-of-work = “scorched-earth” blockchains
● Tremendous energy waste,
now comparable to all of Irela...
Permissioned Blockchains
Just decide administratively who participates;
Fixed or manually-changed group of “miners”
–  No...
Other Membership Approaches
● Proof-of-Stake: assigns consensus shares in
proportion to prior capital investment
–  Could...
Open Democratic Blockchains?
Proof-of-Personhood: “one person one vote”
● e.g., via Pseudonym Parties [SocialNets ‘08]
● P...
Blockchains need solid foundations
Conclusion
In essence, a blockchain is:
● A distributed ledger
● A consensus protocol
● A membership protocol
Thank you.
P...
Prochain SlideShare
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Blockchain for Beginners

By Bryan Ford
#cybsec16

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Blockchain for Beginners

  1. 1. Blockchain for Beginners Bryan Ford Decentralized/Distributed Systems (DEDIS)
  2. 2. What is a Blockchain? In essence, a blockchain is: ● A distributed ledger ● A consensus protocol ● A membership protocol
  3. 3. How to track wealth (or anything)? Things ● Gold, beads, cash... Ledgers ● Who owns what?
  4. 4. Precedent: the Rai Stones of Yap Stone “coins” weighing thousands of kilograms ● Left in place once created (“mined”) ● Ownership transfer by public proclamation (this comparison shamelessly borrowed from Gün Sirer and others)
  5. 5. Alice 5 BTC Bob 2 BTC Charlie 3 BTC ... Distributed Ledgers Problem: we don't want to trust any designated, centralized authority to maintain the ledger Solution: “everyone” keeps a copy of the ledger! – Everyone checks everyone else's changes to it Alice 5 BTC Bob 2 BTC Charlie 3 BTC ... Alice's copy Alice 5 BTC Bob 2 BTC Charlie 3 BTC ... Bob's copy Alice 5 BTC Bob 2 BTC Charlie 3 BTC ... Charlie's copy
  6. 6. The Basic Goal: to Distribute Trust “weakest-link” security “strongest-link” security in a small group “strongest-link” security in a large group
  7. 7. The Bitcoin Blockchain
  8. 8. The Power of Distributed Ledgers Can represent a distributed electronic record of: ● Who owns how much currency? (Bitcoin) ● Who owns a name or a digital work of art? ● What are the terms of a contract? (Ethereum) ● When was a document written? (notaries) ● …
  9. 9. What is a Blockchain? In essence, a blockchain is: ● A distributed ledger ● A consensus protocol ● A membership protocol
  10. 10. Blockchains Require Consensus Replicating a (fixed) ledger is actually easy… ● Decades-old technology: e.g., gossip protocols But the participants must agree somehow on who gets to extend the blockchain, and how! ● Must reach a distributed consensus on all changes
  11. 11. Nakamoto Consensus Public blockchains such as Bitcoin, Ethereum use consensus by crypto-lottery 1) Miners print their own “lottery tickets” by solving crypto-puzzle (proof-of-work) 2) Winner gets to add one block to blockchain; typically gets reward: e.g., print new money 3) All miners gravitate to longest chain. Repeat.
  12. 12. Drawbacks of Nakamoto Consensus ● Transaction delay – Any transaction takes ~10 mins minimum in Bitcoin ● Weak consistency: – You’re not really certain your transaction is committed until you wait ~1 hour or more ● Low throughput: – Bitcoin: ~7 transactions/second ● Proof-of-work mining: – Wastes huge amount of energy
  13. 13. Scaling Blockchains is Not Easy
  14. 14. Blockchain Scaling Approaches Avoid the problem: ● Move more work off-blockchain (Bitcoin) – Shifts burdens onto users, “trusted” intermediaries ● Tweak tuning parameters (Ethereum) – Limited headroom, reduced security margins ● Small, semi-closed groups (Ripple, Stellar) – Lose openness, public transparency benefits Solve the problem: ● Rethink architecture (Bitcoin-NG, ByzCoin) – Technically hard but best long-term solution
  15. 15. The Problem with “Off-Blockchain”... Even if the blockchain is secure, your money isn't! ● The only convenient/feature-rich ways to use are via less-secure Web exchanges, etc. – Ask you to “trust them” but frequently compromised
  16. 16. ByzCoin: Fast, Scalable Blockchains DEDIS lab project presented in [USENIX Security ‘16] ● Permanent transaction commitment in seconds ● 700+ TPS demonstrated (100x Bitcoin, ~PayPal) ● Low-power verification on light mobile devices 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 ... 5-10 sec Bitcoin Cothority Miner Witnesses Key-Block Micro-Block depends on 6 Co-Signature
  17. 17. What is a Blockchain? In essence, a blockchain is: ● A distributed ledger ● A consensus protocol ● A membership protocol
  18. 18. Who Participates in Consensus? Permissionless blockchains (Bitcoin, Ethereum): “anyone” who invests in solving crypto-puzzles. ● Now practical only with ASICs and cheap power ● Re-centralization: e.g., 4 pools now hold >50%
  19. 19. Environmental Costs Proof-of-work = “scorched-earth” blockchains ● Tremendous energy waste, now comparable to all of Ireland ●
  20. 20. Permissioned Blockchains Just decide administratively who participates; Fixed or manually-changed group of “miners” –  No proof-of-work needed → low energy cost –  More mature consensus protocols applicable –  Higher human organizational costs –  No longer open for “anyone” to participate
  21. 21. Other Membership Approaches ● Proof-of-Stake: assigns consensus shares in proportion to prior capital investment –  Could address energy waste problem –  Major unsolved security & incentive problems –  Just reinvents the shareholder corporation
  22. 22. Open Democratic Blockchains? Proof-of-Personhood: “one person one vote” ● e.g., via Pseudonym Parties [SocialNets ‘08] ● Participants mint new currency at equal rate – Decentralized analog to “basic income”?
  23. 23. Blockchains need solid foundations
  24. 24. Conclusion In essence, a blockchain is: ● A distributed ledger ● A consensus protocol ● A membership protocol Thank you. Prof. Bryan Ford, head of DEDIS lab at EPFL.

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  • Immerse108

    Nov. 26, 2016

By Bryan Ford #cybsec16

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