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Presentation on Football (Soccer)

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Presentation on Football (Soccer)

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Class 12 Presentation on Football of Physical Education. History, Rules, Dimensions etc. of Football in Presentation of subject of HPE/PHE.

Class 12 Presentation on Football of Physical Education. History, Rules, Dimensions etc. of Football in Presentation of subject of HPE/PHE.

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Presentation on Football (Soccer)

  1. 1. FOOTBALL Name Aaditya Pandey Class XII - D Roll No. 1
  2. 2. History Modern football originated in Britain in the 19th century. Since before medieval times, “folk football” games had been played in towns and villages according to local customs and with a minimum of rules. Industrialization and urbanization, which reduced the amount of leisure time and space available to the working class, combined with a history of legal prohibitions against particularly violent and destructive forms of folk football to undermine the game’s status from the early 19th century onward. However, football was taken up as a winter game between residence houses at public (independent) schools such as Winchester, Charterhouse, and Eton. Each school had its own rules; some allowed limited handling of the ball and others did not. The variance in rules made it difficult for public schoolboys entering university to continue playing except with former schoolmates. As early as 1843 an attempt to standardize and codify the rules of play was made at the University of Cambridge, whose students joined most public schools in 1848 in adopting these “Cambridge rules,” which were further spread by Cambridge graduates who formed football clubs. In 1863 a series of meetings involving clubs from metropolitan London and surrounding counties produced the printed rules of football, which prohibited the carrying of the ball. Thus, the “handling” game of rugby remained outside the newly formed Football Association (FA). Indeed, by 1870 all handling of the ball except by the goalkeeper was prohibited by the FA.
  3. 3. History The new rules were not universally accepted in Britain, however; many clubs retained their own rules, especially in and around Sheffield. Although this northern English city was the home of the first provincial club to join the FA, in 1867 it also gave birth to the Sheffield Football Association, the forerunner of later county associations. Sheffield and London clubs played two matches against each other in 1866, and a year later a match pitting a club from Middlesex against one from Kent and Surrey was played under the revised rules. In 1871 15 FA clubs accepted an invitation to enter a cup competition and to contribute to the purchase of a trophy. By 1877 the associations of Great Britain had agreed upon a uniform code, 43 clubs were in competition, and the London clubs’ initial dominance had diminished.
  4. 4. Specification A football is 28–30 cm (11–12 in) long and 58–62 cm (23–24 in) in circumference at its widest point. It weighs 410–460 g (14–16 oz) and is inflated to 65.7–68.8 kPa (9.5–10.0 psi).
  5. 5. Measurement of Field The pitch is rectangular in shape. The longer sides are called touchlines. The other opposing sides are called the goal lines. The two goal lines must be between 45 and 90 m (50 and 100 yd) wide, and be the same length. The two touchlines must be between 90 and 120 m (100 and 130 yd) long, and be the same length. For international matches the goal lines must be between 64 and 75 m (70 and 80 yd) wide, and the touchlines must be between 100 and 110 m (110 and 120 yd) long. Goals are placed at the centre of each goal-line. These consist of two upright posts placed equidistant from the corner flagposts, joined at the top by a horizontal crossbar. The inner edges of the posts must be 7.32 metres (8 yd) apart, and the lower edge of the crossbar must be 2.44 metres (8 ft) above the ground.
  6. 6. Measurement of Field
  7. 7. Major Rules  A match consists of two 45 minutes halves with a 15 minute rest period in between.  Each team can have a minimum off 11 players and a minimum of 7 players are needed to constitute a match.  Each team can name up to 7 substitute players. Substitutions can be made at any time of the match with each team being able to make a maximum of 3 substitutions per side. In the event of all three substitutes being made and a player having to leave the field for injury the team will be forced to play without a replacement for that player.  Each game must include one referee and two assistant referees. It's the job of the referee to act as time keeper and make any decisions which may need to be made such as fouls, free kicks, throw ins, penalties and added on time at the end of each half.<li>If the game needs to head to extra time as a result of both teams being level in a match then 30 minutes will be added in the form of two 15 minute halves after the allotted 90 minutes.  If teams are still level after extra time then a penalty shootout must take place.  The whole ball must cross the goal line for it to constitute as a goal.
  8. 8. Major Fouls Kicking (or trying to kick) an opponent Tripping an opponent Jumping at an opponent Charging an opponent in particularly dangerous or violent way Charging an opponent from behind in a violent way Striking or attempting to strike an opponent Holding an opponent Pushing an opponent Touching the ball with your hands (handling the ball)
  9. 9. Fundamental Skill 1. Passing: Passing is one of the most fundamental skills in soccer, as it is how you move the ball from yourself to another teammate. 2. Receiving a Pass: Whether you are receiving a pass that is on the ground or traveling through the air, you will want to square your shoulders to the direction the ball is coming from. 3. Shooting: There are a number of unconventional ways to score a goal, but the fundamental way to try to score is by taking a shot. 4. Dribbling: Outside of passing, dribbling is the primary method of moving the ball up the field. 5. Goalkeeping: The goalkeeper is the last line of defense, in charge of doing whatever possible to keep the ball out of the
  10. 10. Terminology • Additional Time: Minutes added to the end of halfs, based on time used up during stoppages • Attacker: A player whose role is primarily offensive and who must create goal-scoring opportunities. • Booking: When the referee acknowledges a foul by the offender. • Captain: A player who organizes and leads the team on the field. • Centre spot: The spot on which the ball is placed at the beginning of the game. • Clean sheet: When a team does not concede a goal in a game. • Clearance: When a player kicks the ball away from their own goal to prevent the opposition from scoring. • Dead ball: Where a game is resumed and the ball is stationary. • Defender: Players whose role is to stopp the opposition from scoring. • Deflection: When a shot or pass makes contact with another body and its trajectory is altered as a result. • First touch: An action made by a player which involves controlling the ball upon receiving it. • Free-kick: Awarded to players who are fouled outside of the penalty area.Friendly- exhibition match. • Goalkeeper: A player’s whose role is to prevent the opposition from scoring by using their hands. • Half-time: An interval, usually of around fifteen minutes, taken between the two halves of a match. • Half-volley: A shot struck by a player at the same moment a ball drops and makes contact with the ground. • Handball: A foul is awarded against the player when the player uses their hand to make contact with the ball.
  11. 11. Terminology • Injury time: Another term for ‘extra time’. • Kill the ball: When a player stops the ball from moving at that moment. • Man of the Match: An award given to the best player in a game. • Midfielder: Players who play in the area between the attackers and defenders • Own-goal: When a player kicks the ball into their own net. • Penalty: Awarded to a team when one of their players’ is fouled inside the penalty area of the opposition. • Pitch invasion: When spectators run onto the pitch. • Red Card: A player must leave the field immediately when they receive a red card after several fouls. • Referee: Main match official in charge of the assistant referees and fourth official who oversees the game. • Yellow card: Awarded to a player that commits a objectionable offence. Piitch Invasion
  12. 12. Popular Indian Players S u n i l C h h e t r i G u r p r e e t S i n g h S a n d h u S a n d e s h J h i n g a n J e j e L a l p e k h l u a P r o n a y H a l d e r
  13. 13. Pouular International Players L i o n e l M e s s i C r i s t i a n o R o n a l d o H a r r y K a n e N e y m a r K y l i a n M b a p p é
  14. 14. Indian Tournaments 1. Indian Super League 2. I-League 3. Super Cup 4. Santosh Trophy 5. India Women's League
  15. 15. International Tournaments 1. Champions League 2. European Championship 3. Europa League 4. Premier League 5. FA Cup
  16. 16. Trophies Associated  FIFA World Cup Trophy: The FIFA world cup trophy is arguably the most sought after trophy in the whole world. The sense of pride and accomplishment the winning team get from holding this trophy must be incredible. When a team wins this trophy, it’s not just them that are happy either. A world cup win can unite a country. Spreading a healthy wave of joy and winning spirit throughout a nation.  Africa Cup of Nations: Taking place every two years, the Africa Cup of Nations involves the 25 best football clubs in Africa. First held in 1957, the teams battle throughout the tournament to prove they are the best in the continent. Egypt is currently the most successful team, with 7 wins to their name. The current trophy is a gold plated cup which was made in Italy. The beautiful trophy features a model of the earth which is surrounded by footballs.  Confederations Cup: The Confederations Cup is held in the same country that will host the World Cup the following year. The trophy consists of a golden globe which sits on top of a twisted column. The column has “two gold ribbons [that] are wrapped around the central body in a festive, dynamic movement.”. The design is not dissimilar to the world cup trophy, which also features a golden globe and a twisted column.
  17. 17. FOOTBALL Name Aaditya Pandey Class XII - D Roll No. 1 Thank You for your Attention

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