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node.js
ry@tinyclouds.org
November 8, 2009
node.js in brief:
Server-side Javascript
Built on Google’s V8
Evented, non-blocking I/O. Similar to
EventMachine or Twiste...
I/O needs to be done differently.
Many web applications have code
like this:
var result =
db.query("select * from T");
// use result
What is the software do...
In many cases, just waiting for the
response.
I/O latency
L1: 3 cycles
L2: 14 cycles
RAM: 250 cycles
DISK: 41,000,000 cycles
NETWORK: 240,000,000 cycles
Better software can multitask.
Other threads of execution can run
while waiting.
Is that the best that can be done?
A look at Apache and NGINX.
Apache vs NGINX
concurrency × reqs/sec
http://blog.webfaction.com/a-little-holiday-present
Apache vs NGINX
concurrency × memory
http://blog.webfaction.com/a-little-holiday-present
Apache vs NGINX
The difference?
Apache uses one thread per
connection.
NGINX doesn’t use threads. It uses
an event loop.
Context switching is not free
Execution stacks take up memory
For massive concurrency, cannot
use an OS thread for each
co...
Green threads or coroutines can
improve the situation dramatically
BUT there is still machinery involved
to create the ill...
Threaded concurrency is a leaky
abstraction.
Code like this
var result = db.query("select..");
// use result
either blocks the entire process or
implies multiple execu...
But a line of code like this
db.query("select..", function (result) {
// use result
});
allows the program to return to th...
db.query("select..", function (result) {
// use result
});
This is how I/O should be done.
So why isn’t everyone using event
loops, callbacks, and non-blocking
I/O?
For reasons both cultural and
infrastructural.
Cultural Bias
We’re taught I/O with this:
1 puts("Enter your name: ");
2 var name = gets();
3 puts("Name: " + name);
We’re...
Cultural Bias
Code like
1 puts("Enter your name: ");
2 gets(function (name) {
3 puts("Name: " + name);
4 });
is rejected a...
Missing Infrastructure
So why isn’t everyone using event
loops?
Single threaded event loops require
I/O to be non-blocking...
Missing Infrastructure
POSIX async file I/O not available.
Man pages don’t state if a function will access the
disk. (e.g g...
Too Much Infrastructure
EventMachine, Twisted, AnyEvent
provide very good event loop
platforms.
Easy to create efficent ser...
Too Much Infrastructure
Users still require expert knowledge
of event loops, non-blocking I/O.
Javascript designed specifically to be
used with an event loop:
Anonymous functions, closures.
Only one callback at a time....
The culture of Javascript is already
geared towards evented
programming.
This is the node.js project:
To provide a purely evented,
non-blocking infrastructure to
script highly concurrent programs.
Design Goals
No function should direct perform I/O.
To receive info from disk, network, or
another process there must be a...
Design Goals
Low-level.
Stream everything; never force the
buffering of data.
Do not remove functionality present
at the P...
Design Goals
Have built-in support for the most
important protocols:
TCP, DNS, HTTP
Design Goals
Support many HTTP features.
Chunked requests and responses.
Keep-alive.
Hang requests for comet
applications.
Design Goals
The API should be both familiar to
client-side JS programmers and
old school UNIX hackers.
Be platform indepe...
Usage and
Examples
(using node 0.1.16)
Download, configure, compile, and
make install it.
http://nodejs.org/
No dependencies other than Python
for the build syste...
1 var sys = require("sys");
2
3 setTimeout(function () {
4 sys.puts("world");
5 }, 2000);
6 sys.puts("hello");
A program w...
1 var sys = require("sys");
2
3 setTimeout(function () {
4 sys.puts("world");
5 }, 2000);
6 sys.puts("hello");
Node exits ...
% node hello_world.js
hello
2 seconds later...
% node hello_world.js
hello
world
%
Change the “hello world” program to
loop forever, but print an exit
message when the user kills it.
We will use the specia...
1 puts = require("sys").puts;
2
3 setInterval(function () {
4 puts("hello");
5 }, 500);
6
7 process.addListener("SIGINT",
...
process.addListener("SIGINT", ...);
The process object emits an event
when it receives a signal. Like in the
DOM, you need...
Also:
process.pid
process.ARGV
process.ENV
process.cwd()
process.memoryUsage()
Like process, many other objects
in Node emit events.
A TCP server emits a
"connection" event each time
someone connects.
An HTTP upload emits a "body"
event on each packet.
All objects which emit events are are
instances of
process.EventEmitter.
Write a program which:
starts a TCP server on port 8000
send the peer a message
close the connection
1 var tcp = require("tcp");
2
3 var s = tcp.createServer();
4 s.addListener("connection",
5 function (c) {
6 c.send("hello...
% node server.js &
[1] 9120
% telnet localhost 8000
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is ’ˆ]’.
...
The "connection" listener can
be provided as the first argument to
tcp.createServer(), so the
program can be simplified:
1 var tcp = require("tcp");
2 tcp.createServer(function (c) {
3 c.send("hello!n");
4 c.close();
5 }).listen(8000);
File I/O is non-blocking too.
(Something typically hard to do.)
As an example, a program that
outputs the last time /etc/passwd
was modified:
1 var stat = require("posix").stat,
2 puts = ...
A promise is a kind of
EventEmitter which emits either
"success" or "error". (But not
both.)
All file operations return a p...
promise.addCallback(cb)
is just API sugar for
promise.addListener("success", cb)
Simple HTTP Server:
1 var http = require("http");
2
3 http.createServer(function (req,res) {
4 res.sendHeader(200,
5 {"Con...
% node http_server.js &
[4] 27355
% curl -i http://localhost:8000/
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: text/plain
Connection: ke...
Streaming HTTP Server:
1 var http = require("http");
2 http.createServer(function (req,res) {
3 res.sendHeader(200,
4 {"Co...
% node http_server2.js &
[4] 27355
% curl http://localhost:8000/
Hello
Two seconds later...
% node http_server2.js &
[4] 2...
1 var sys = require("sys");
2 sys.exec("ls -l /")
3 .addCallback(function (output) {
4 sys.puts(output);
5 });
Programs ca...
But Node never forces buffering
∃ a lower-level facility to stream data
through the STDIO of the child
procresses.
Simple ...
1 var puts = require("sys").puts;
2
3 var cat =
4 process.createChildProcess("cat");
5
6 cat.addListener("output",
7 funct...
Demo / Experiment
An IRC Daemon written in javascript.
irc.nodejs.org
#node.js
Source code:
http://tinyurl.com/ircd-js
htt...
Internal Design
V8 (Google)
libev event loop library (Marc Lehmann)
libeio thread pool library (Marc Lehmann)
http-parser a ragel HTTP par...
Blocking (or possibly blocking)
system calls are executed in the
thread pool.
Signal handlers and thread pool
callbacks ar...
% node myscript.js < hugefile.txt
STDIN_FILENO will refer to a file.
Cannot select() on files;
read() will block.
Solution: Start a pipe, and a
“pumping thread”.
Pump data from blocking fd into pipe.
Main thread can poll for data on the...
Future
Fix API warts.
More modularity; break Node into shared objects.
Include libraries for common databases in
distribut...
Future
Version 0.2 in late December or
January.
Core API will be frozen.
Questions...?
http://nodejs.org/
ry@tinyclouds.org
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Original slides from Ryan Dahl's NodeJs intro talk

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These are the original slides from the nodejs talk. I was surprised not find them on slideshare so adding them. The video link is here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztspvPYybIY

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Original slides from Ryan Dahl's NodeJs intro talk

  1. 1. node.js ry@tinyclouds.org November 8, 2009
  2. 2. node.js in brief: Server-side Javascript Built on Google’s V8 Evented, non-blocking I/O. Similar to EventMachine or Twisted. CommonJS module system. 8000 lines of C/C++, 2000 lines of Javascript, 14 contributors.
  3. 3. I/O needs to be done differently.
  4. 4. Many web applications have code like this: var result = db.query("select * from T"); // use result What is the software doing while it queries the database?
  5. 5. In many cases, just waiting for the response.
  6. 6. I/O latency L1: 3 cycles L2: 14 cycles RAM: 250 cycles DISK: 41,000,000 cycles NETWORK: 240,000,000 cycles
  7. 7. Better software can multitask. Other threads of execution can run while waiting.
  8. 8. Is that the best that can be done? A look at Apache and NGINX.
  9. 9. Apache vs NGINX concurrency × reqs/sec http://blog.webfaction.com/a-little-holiday-present
  10. 10. Apache vs NGINX concurrency × memory http://blog.webfaction.com/a-little-holiday-present
  11. 11. Apache vs NGINX The difference? Apache uses one thread per connection. NGINX doesn’t use threads. It uses an event loop.
  12. 12. Context switching is not free Execution stacks take up memory For massive concurrency, cannot use an OS thread for each connection.
  13. 13. Green threads or coroutines can improve the situation dramatically BUT there is still machinery involved to create the illusion of holding execution on I/O.
  14. 14. Threaded concurrency is a leaky abstraction.
  15. 15. Code like this var result = db.query("select.."); // use result either blocks the entire process or implies multiple execution stacks.
  16. 16. But a line of code like this db.query("select..", function (result) { // use result }); allows the program to return to the event loop immediately. No machinery required.
  17. 17. db.query("select..", function (result) { // use result }); This is how I/O should be done.
  18. 18. So why isn’t everyone using event loops, callbacks, and non-blocking I/O? For reasons both cultural and infrastructural.
  19. 19. Cultural Bias We’re taught I/O with this: 1 puts("Enter your name: "); 2 var name = gets(); 3 puts("Name: " + name); We’re taught to demand input and do nothing until we have it.
  20. 20. Cultural Bias Code like 1 puts("Enter your name: "); 2 gets(function (name) { 3 puts("Name: " + name); 4 }); is rejected as too complicated.
  21. 21. Missing Infrastructure So why isn’t everyone using event loops? Single threaded event loops require I/O to be non-blocking Most libraries are not.
  22. 22. Missing Infrastructure POSIX async file I/O not available. Man pages don’t state if a function will access the disk. (e.g getpwuid()) No closures or anonymous functions in C; makes callbacks difficult. Database libraries (e.g. libmysql client) do not provide support for asynchronous queries Asynchronous DNS resolution not standard on most systems.
  23. 23. Too Much Infrastructure EventMachine, Twisted, AnyEvent provide very good event loop platforms. Easy to create efficent servers. But users are confused how to combine with other available libraries.
  24. 24. Too Much Infrastructure Users still require expert knowledge of event loops, non-blocking I/O.
  25. 25. Javascript designed specifically to be used with an event loop: Anonymous functions, closures. Only one callback at a time. I/O through DOM event callbacks.
  26. 26. The culture of Javascript is already geared towards evented programming.
  27. 27. This is the node.js project: To provide a purely evented, non-blocking infrastructure to script highly concurrent programs.
  28. 28. Design Goals No function should direct perform I/O. To receive info from disk, network, or another process there must be a callback.
  29. 29. Design Goals Low-level. Stream everything; never force the buffering of data. Do not remove functionality present at the POSIX layer. For example, support half-closed TCP connections.
  30. 30. Design Goals Have built-in support for the most important protocols: TCP, DNS, HTTP
  31. 31. Design Goals Support many HTTP features. Chunked requests and responses. Keep-alive. Hang requests for comet applications.
  32. 32. Design Goals The API should be both familiar to client-side JS programmers and old school UNIX hackers. Be platform independent.
  33. 33. Usage and Examples (using node 0.1.16)
  34. 34. Download, configure, compile, and make install it. http://nodejs.org/ No dependencies other than Python for the build system. V8 is included in the distribution.
  35. 35. 1 var sys = require("sys"); 2 3 setTimeout(function () { 4 sys.puts("world"); 5 }, 2000); 6 sys.puts("hello"); A program which prints “hello”, waits 2 seconds, outputs “world”, and then exits.
  36. 36. 1 var sys = require("sys"); 2 3 setTimeout(function () { 4 sys.puts("world"); 5 }, 2000); 6 sys.puts("hello"); Node exits automatically when there is nothing else to do.
  37. 37. % node hello_world.js hello 2 seconds later... % node hello_world.js hello world %
  38. 38. Change the “hello world” program to loop forever, but print an exit message when the user kills it. We will use the special object process and the "SIGINT" signal.
  39. 39. 1 puts = require("sys").puts; 2 3 setInterval(function () { 4 puts("hello"); 5 }, 500); 6 7 process.addListener("SIGINT", 8 function () { 9 puts("good bye"); 10 process.exit(0) 11 });
  40. 40. process.addListener("SIGINT", ...); The process object emits an event when it receives a signal. Like in the DOM, you need only add a listener to catch them.
  41. 41. Also: process.pid process.ARGV process.ENV process.cwd() process.memoryUsage()
  42. 42. Like process, many other objects in Node emit events.
  43. 43. A TCP server emits a "connection" event each time someone connects. An HTTP upload emits a "body" event on each packet.
  44. 44. All objects which emit events are are instances of process.EventEmitter.
  45. 45. Write a program which: starts a TCP server on port 8000 send the peer a message close the connection
  46. 46. 1 var tcp = require("tcp"); 2 3 var s = tcp.createServer(); 4 s.addListener("connection", 5 function (c) { 6 c.send("hello!"); 7 c.close(); 8 }); 9 10 s.listen(8000);
  47. 47. % node server.js & [1] 9120 % telnet localhost 8000 Trying 127.0.0.1... Connected to localhost. Escape character is ’ˆ]’. hello! Connection closed by foreign host. %
  48. 48. The "connection" listener can be provided as the first argument to tcp.createServer(), so the program can be simplified:
  49. 49. 1 var tcp = require("tcp"); 2 tcp.createServer(function (c) { 3 c.send("hello!n"); 4 c.close(); 5 }).listen(8000);
  50. 50. File I/O is non-blocking too. (Something typically hard to do.)
  51. 51. As an example, a program that outputs the last time /etc/passwd was modified: 1 var stat = require("posix").stat, 2 puts = require("sys").puts; 3 4 var promise = stat("/etc/passwd"); 5 6 promise.addCallback(function (s) { 7 puts("modified: " + s.mtime); 8 });
  52. 52. A promise is a kind of EventEmitter which emits either "success" or "error". (But not both.) All file operations return a promise.
  53. 53. promise.addCallback(cb) is just API sugar for promise.addListener("success", cb)
  54. 54. Simple HTTP Server: 1 var http = require("http"); 2 3 http.createServer(function (req,res) { 4 res.sendHeader(200, 5 {"Content-Type": "text/plain"}); 6 res.sendBody("Hellorn"); 7 res.sendBody("Worldrn"); 8 res.finish(); 9 }).listen(8000);
  55. 55. % node http_server.js & [4] 27355 % curl -i http://localhost:8000/ HTTP/1.1 200 OK Content-Type: text/plain Connection: keep-alive Transfer-Encoding: chunked Hello World %
  56. 56. Streaming HTTP Server: 1 var http = require("http"); 2 http.createServer(function (req,res) { 3 res.sendHeader(200, 4 {"Content-Type": "text/plain"}); 5 6 res.sendBody("Hel"); 7 res.sendBody("lorn"); 8 9 setTimeout(function () { 10 res.sendBody("Worldrn"); 11 res.finish(); 12 }, 2000); 13 }).listen(8000);
  57. 57. % node http_server2.js & [4] 27355 % curl http://localhost:8000/ Hello Two seconds later... % node http_server2.js & [4] 27355 % curl http://localhost:8000/ Hello World %
  58. 58. 1 var sys = require("sys"); 2 sys.exec("ls -l /") 3 .addCallback(function (output) { 4 sys.puts(output); 5 }); Programs can be run with sys.exec()
  59. 59. But Node never forces buffering ∃ a lower-level facility to stream data through the STDIO of the child procresses. Simple IPC.
  60. 60. 1 var puts = require("sys").puts; 2 3 var cat = 4 process.createChildProcess("cat"); 5 6 cat.addListener("output", 7 function (data) { 8 if (data) sys.puts(data); 9 }); 10 11 cat.write("hello "); 12 cat.write("worldn"); 13 cat.close();
  61. 61. Demo / Experiment An IRC Daemon written in javascript. irc.nodejs.org #node.js Source code: http://tinyurl.com/ircd-js http://gist.github.com/a3d0bbbff196af633995
  62. 62. Internal Design
  63. 63. V8 (Google) libev event loop library (Marc Lehmann) libeio thread pool library (Marc Lehmann) http-parser a ragel HTTP parser (Me) evcom stream socket library on top of libev (Me) udns non-blocking DNS resolver (Michael Tokarev)
  64. 64. Blocking (or possibly blocking) system calls are executed in the thread pool. Signal handlers and thread pool callbacks are marshaled back into the main thread via a pipe.
  65. 65. % node myscript.js < hugefile.txt STDIN_FILENO will refer to a file. Cannot select() on files; read() will block.
  66. 66. Solution: Start a pipe, and a “pumping thread”. Pump data from blocking fd into pipe. Main thread can poll for data on the pipe. (See deps/coupling if you’re interested)
  67. 67. Future Fix API warts. More modularity; break Node into shared objects. Include libraries for common databases in distribution. Improve performance. TLS support Web Worker-like API. (Probably using ChildProcess)
  68. 68. Future Version 0.2 in late December or January. Core API will be frozen.
  69. 69. Questions...? http://nodejs.org/ ry@tinyclouds.org

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