Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

Malnutrition and its prevention.pptx

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 24 Publicité

Malnutrition and its prevention.pptx

Télécharger pour lire hors ligne

Malnutrition refers to deficiencies, excesses or imbalances in a person’s intake of energy and/or nutrients. The term malnutrition covers 2 broad groups of conditions. One is ‘undernutrition’—which includes stunting (low height for age), wasting (low weight for height), underweight (low weight for age) and micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies (a lack of important vitamins and minerals). The other is overweight, obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer).


At a health centre in South Sudan a health workers helps a mother weigh her child to check on the child’s nutrition levels.

What are the consequences of malnutrition?
Malnutrition affects people in every country. Around 1.9 billion adults worldwide are overweight, while 462 million are underweight. An estimated 41 million children under the age of 5 years are overweight or obese, while some 159 million are stunted and 50 million are wasted. Adding to this burden are the 528 million or 29% of women of reproductive age around the world affected by anaemia, for which approximately half would be amenable to iron supplementation.

Many families cannot afford or access enough nutritious foods like fresh fruit and vegetables, legumes, meat, and milk, while foods and drinks high in fat, sugar, and salt are cheaper and more readily available, leading to a rapid rise in the number of children and adults who are overweight and obese, in poor as well as rich countries. It is quite common to find undernutrition and overweight within the same community, household or even individual – it is possible to be both overweight and micronutrient deficient, for example.

What is being done to address malnutrition?
In April 2016, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition from 2016 to 2025. The Decade aims to catalyse policy commitments that result in measurable action to address all forms of malnutrition. The aim is to ensure all people have access to healthier and more sustainable diets to eradicate all forms of malnutrition worldwide.Data on the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is currently available directly from these sources.

Please note that the GHO APIs do not currently provide COVID-19 data. A data extract from the WHO Situation dashboard is available from UNOCHA's Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX ) platform. This content is provided as set of regularly updated CSV files.The SCORE for Health Data Technical Package was developed by WHO and partners to assist Member States in strengthening country data systems and capacity to monitor progress towards the health-related SDGs, Triple Billion targets, and other national and subnational health priorities.Stunting has declined steadily since 2000 – but faster progress is needed to reach the 2030 target. Wasting persists at alarming rates and overweight will require a reversal in trajectory if the 2030 target is to be achiev

Malnutrition refers to deficiencies, excesses or imbalances in a person’s intake of energy and/or nutrients. The term malnutrition covers 2 broad groups of conditions. One is ‘undernutrition’—which includes stunting (low height for age), wasting (low weight for height), underweight (low weight for age) and micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies (a lack of important vitamins and minerals). The other is overweight, obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer).


At a health centre in South Sudan a health workers helps a mother weigh her child to check on the child’s nutrition levels.

What are the consequences of malnutrition?
Malnutrition affects people in every country. Around 1.9 billion adults worldwide are overweight, while 462 million are underweight. An estimated 41 million children under the age of 5 years are overweight or obese, while some 159 million are stunted and 50 million are wasted. Adding to this burden are the 528 million or 29% of women of reproductive age around the world affected by anaemia, for which approximately half would be amenable to iron supplementation.

Many families cannot afford or access enough nutritious foods like fresh fruit and vegetables, legumes, meat, and milk, while foods and drinks high in fat, sugar, and salt are cheaper and more readily available, leading to a rapid rise in the number of children and adults who are overweight and obese, in poor as well as rich countries. It is quite common to find undernutrition and overweight within the same community, household or even individual – it is possible to be both overweight and micronutrient deficient, for example.

What is being done to address malnutrition?
In April 2016, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition from 2016 to 2025. The Decade aims to catalyse policy commitments that result in measurable action to address all forms of malnutrition. The aim is to ensure all people have access to healthier and more sustainable diets to eradicate all forms of malnutrition worldwide.Data on the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is currently available directly from these sources.

Please note that the GHO APIs do not currently provide COVID-19 data. A data extract from the WHO Situation dashboard is available from UNOCHA's Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX ) platform. This content is provided as set of regularly updated CSV files.The SCORE for Health Data Technical Package was developed by WHO and partners to assist Member States in strengthening country data systems and capacity to monitor progress towards the health-related SDGs, Triple Billion targets, and other national and subnational health priorities.Stunting has declined steadily since 2000 – but faster progress is needed to reach the 2030 target. Wasting persists at alarming rates and overweight will require a reversal in trajectory if the 2030 target is to be achiev

Publicité
Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Plus récents (20)

Publicité

Malnutrition and its prevention.pptx

  1. 1. Malnutrition and its Prevention By Roshni Kumari Roll no:- A25
  2. 2. Introduction Malnutrition is Defined as the imbalance between the body’s need and the intake of nutrients, which can lead to nutritional disorder.
  3. 3. Introduction Malnutrition is the condition that develops when the body does not get the right amount of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients which were needed to maintain healthy tissues and organ function. So, Intake of Nutrients in proper amount is Needed.
  4. 4. Malnutriton is divided into two main types:- ● Under-nutrition ● Over-nutrition In under-nutrition nutrients are undersupplied, and in over- nutrition nutrients are over supplied both causes nutrition disorder. Types of the Malnutriton
  5. 5. Causes of Malnutriton
  6. 6. Primary Causes
  7. 7. Secondary Causes
  8. 8. Disorders due to Malnutrition ❖ Protein-energy malnutrition ➢ Kwashiorkor ➢ Marasmus ❖ Under nutrition of vitamins and minerals ❖ Obesity Kwashiorkor Marasmus
  9. 9. Disorders due to Under nutrition of Minerals ➔ Calcium - Rickets ➔ Iodine deficiency - Goiter ➔ Iron deficiency - Anemia ➔ Zinc - Growth retardation
  10. 10. Disorders due to Under nutrition of Vitamins ➔ Thiamine (Vitamin B1) - BeriBeri ➔ Niacin (Vitamin B3) - Pellagra ➔ Vitamin C - Scurvy ➔ Vitamin D - Rickets
  11. 11. Kwashiorkor ➔ Between 1-3 years old children ➔ Reasons:- ➔ Very low protein. ➔ Starchy foods are main staple ➔ Never Exclusively dietary
  12. 12. Kwashiorkor (Cont.) ❖ Symptoms ➢ Muscle wasting ➢ Hair Changes ➢ De-pigmentation of Skin ➢ Moonface ➢ Edema( swelling caused by excess fluid trapped in your body's tissues)
  13. 13. Marasmus ➔ Common in the 1st Year of Life ➔ Reasons:- ➔ Balanced Starvation ➔ Insufficient Breast milk ➔ Dilute milk mixture of lack of hygiene
  14. 14. Marasmus(Cont.) Symptoms:- ➔ Mental Changes ➔ Often diarrhea ➔ No edema ➔ Muscle Wasting ➔ Growth retardation ➔ Variable-subnormal temperature
  15. 15. Thiamine (Vitamin B1) Deficiency - BeriBeri Biochemically, there is accumulation of pyruvic and lactic acid in body fluids Causes:-. ● Weakness of eye Movement and Mental Disturbance ● Cardiac Disfunction Two Forms:- ● Wet Beriberi:- generalized edema, acute cardiac Symptoms and prompt response to thiamine administration ● Dry Beriberi:- edema not present and neurological
  16. 16. Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) Deficiency Functions: 1. Acts as coenzyme of flavoprotein important in CHO metabolism and Celluar Respiration 2. Needed also by retinal eye pigments for light adaptation
  17. 17. Niacin (Vitamin B3) Deficiency - Pellagra Reasons:- ○ Diets low in niacin ○ Amino acid Imbalance or as a result of malabsorption ○ Excessive corn Consumption ○ Alcoholism Symptoms:- ● Weakness, irritability and dizziness ● Diarrhea, dermatitis and dementia ● Mental changes include depression
  18. 18. Goiter A Goiter is a Swelling of the neck resulting from enlargement of the thyroid gland, associated with a thyroid gland that is functioning properly or not. Causes due to Iodine Deficieny.
  19. 19. Anemia ● Anemia occurs when there aren’t enough healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen to your body’s organs. ● Iron Deficiency causes approximately half of all anemia cases worldwide, and affects women more than men. ● This can result if: Bleeding causes loss of red blood cells more quickly than can be replaced.
  20. 20. Rickets ● Rickets is Softening of nones in immature mammals due to lack of Vitamin D, Phosphorus and Calcium. ● The predominant cause is Vitamin D, but lack of adequate vitamin in the diet can also lead to rickets.
  21. 21. Prevention of Malnutrition
  22. 22. 1. Proper Education to Peoples regarding importance of food. 2. Use of modern agricultural techniques to increase the agricultural production. 3. Enrichment of food 4. Fortification of food 5. Genetic Engineering for the development of new varieties Eg. golden rice.
  23. 23. 6. Government projects to provide healthy food to infants and pregnant woman 7. Staple food should available at very cheap rate 8. Common People should adopt rotation in food. 9. Use of Probiotic microorganism in food. 10. Global public health and disease control measure.
  24. 24. Thank You

×