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A Thesis Report On NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN BHOPAL (NID Bhopal)

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A Thesis Report On NID , Bhopal.

CASE STUDIES
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, AHMEDABAD
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, GANDHINAGAR
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, BENGALURU

SITE ANALYSIS OF NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN BHOPAL


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A Thesis Report On NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN BHOPAL (NID Bhopal)

  1. 1. A Thesis Report on NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN BHOPAL Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the degree of BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE By APOORVA SINHA 1216514204 Under the guidance of Ar. K Naga Lakshmi Assistant Professor School of Architecture SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE GITAM DEEMED TO BE UNIVERSITY RUSHIKONDA, VISAKHAPATNAM – 530045 (2014 – 2019)
  2. 2. A Thesis Report on NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN BHOPAL Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the degree of BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE By APOORVA SINHA 1216514204 Under the guidance of Ar. K Naga Lakshmi Assistant Professor School of Architecture SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE GITAM DEEMED TO BE UNIVERSITY RUSHIKONDA, VISAKHAPATNAM – 530045 (2014 – 2019)
  3. 3. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE GANDHI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (GITAM) GANDHINAGAR, RUSHIKONDA, VISAKHAPATNAM CERTIFICATE This is to certify that the Thesis entitled, NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, BHOPAL is being submitted by APOORVA SINHA in partial fulfillment of the academic requirements for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Architecture to GITAM deemed to be University, is a record of bonafide work carried out by the student under guidance and supervision of Asst.Prof Ar. K Naga Lakshmi, during the period December 2017 to April 2018. The results obtained in the project have not been submitted to any other industry or institute for the award of any degree. THESIS GUIDE THESIS COORDINATOR EXTERNAL EXAMINER DIRECTOR
  4. 4. DECLARATION I APOORVA SINHA, hereby declare that the thesis report entitled “NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, BHOPAL” is an original and authentic work done carried out by me during the period December 2017 to April 2018 in the School of Architecture, GITAM deemed to be University, Rushikonda, Visakhapatnam, submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Architecture. The matter embodied in this project work has not been submitted earlier for award of any degree or diploma in any other college or university to the best of my knowledge. APOORVA SINHA 1216514204
  5. 5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I express my sincere gratitude to my guide Ar. K Naga Lakshmi mam for her timely discussion and encouragement, which has enable me to complete my Thesis. I would like to thank to Dr K Mohan sir (Director, School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed to be University Visakhapatnam) & Ar. Bandan Kr. Mishra sir (Thesis Coordinator) for approving my topic and completing the official formalities of the project work. I would also thanks to my co- guides Dr Uma Sankar Basina sir & Deevi Naga Brinda mam for their valuable suggestions given at different stages and inspiration throughout the project work. I am also thankful to my friends Ramya , Diksha & Rukesh for their kind co-operation and support. I would like to express my special thanks to my Parents who encouraged me all the time to complete my Thesis. At last but not least, I am thankful to my entire colleagues who have encouraged me and give their moral support to complete the Thesis.
  6. 6. ABSTRACT The project is a Live project proposed at Bhopal by the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, of the Government of India. The project entails the construction of many structures along with Academic Block which is going to be the main focus of the design. Design education is a somewhat neglected field of education India. It offers tremendous scope for growth in the current state of economic growth. The institutes established have been successful and are rated amongst the top design schools world-over. Design has however failed to secure a strong foothold in the eyes of the average Indian as a viable career choice. This is reflected in the scant dispersal of such institutes, especially when viewed in comparison to other fields of education. Even from the point of view of the country, the design industry contributes in a great way to the overall output of the nation. It also improves the efficiency in overall functioning of the society. Other services by the design industry provides an equal platform to all entrepreneurs so that they can create products and services that will benefit all sections of the society. An advanced design industry has come to become an identity of a successful economy, and has driven businesses and improved lives for people. Despite the immense contributions by design practices, they often go unnoticed. This project aims to address this problem and propose an institute providing not just quality education, but also important design and community services.
  7. 7. Table of Contents CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………1 1.1 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN……………………………………………...1 1.2 HISTORY OF NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN……………………………...2 1.3 PROGRAMMES OFFERED………………………………………………………….3 1.4 NEED & IMPORTANCE OF NID……………………………………………………4 1.1.1. WHAT IS DESIGN & WHAT DESIGN CAN DO?.............................................4 1.1.2. DESIGN AS A STRATEGY FOR A DEVELOPING ECONOMY…………….5 1.1.3. LACK OF DESIGN INSTITUTES OF NATIONAL IMPORTANCE………….6 1.1.4. GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF DESIGN INDUSTRY……………….7 1.1.5. DESIGN INDUSTRY STATISTICS……………………………………………8 1.1.1.1 DESIGNERS IN VARIOUS DESIGN DISCIPLINES………………….8 1.1.1.2 EMPLOYMENT DISTRIBUTION OF DESIGNERS…………………..8 1.1.1.3 DESIGN EDUCATION - NUMBER OF DESIGN PROGRAMS………9 1.1.6. MAKE IN INDIA: MAKING IT HAPPEN BY DESIGN………………………10 1.5 AIM…………………………………………………………………………………….11 1.6 OBJECTIVES………………………………………………………………………….11 1.7 SCOPE…………………………………………………………………………………11 1.8 LIMITATIONS………………………………………………………………………...11 1.9 ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE………………………………………………...11 1.10 METHODOLOGY OF STUDY……………………………………………………….12 CHAPTER 2: LITERATURE STUDY……………………………………………………....13 2.1. BUILDING SPACE REQUIREMENTS ARE CLASSIFIED INTO:………………….13 2.1.1. ADMINISTRATIVE AREAS………………………………………………………13 2.1.2. INSTRUCTIONAL AREA………………………………………………………....13 2.2. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS………………………………………………………..14 2.3. WOOD WORKSHOP…………………………………………………………………..16 2.4. METAL WORKSHOP………………………………………………………………….16 2.5. CERAMIC WORKSHOP………………………………………………………………17 2.6. TEXTILE WORKSHOP………………………………………………………………..18
  8. 8. 2.7. PAINTING WORKSHOP……………………………………………….……………...19 2.8. PHOTOGRAPHY LABORATORY…………………………………………….……...20 2.9. PRINTING STUDIO……………………………………………………………………21 2.10. ANIMATION & FILM MAKING STUDIO………………………………………….21 2.11. JEWELLERY & ART METAL………………………………………………………..22 2.12. STUDIOS………………………………………………………………………………23 2.13. DISPLAY AREA………………………………………………………………………23 2.14. CAMPUS DESIGN…………………………………………………………………….24 CHAPTER 3: CASE STUDIES………………………………………………………….….26 3.1 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, AHMEDABAD……………………………...27 3.1.1. PROJECT BRIEF…………………………………………………………………...27 3.1.2. LOCATION…………………………………………………………………………27 3.1.3. ADJOINING AREAS………………………………………………………….……27 3.1.4. APPROACH………………………………………………………………………....27 3.1.5. SITE ZONING………………………………………………………………………28 3.1.6. SITE PLAN……………………………………………………………………….…28 3.1.7. AREA ANALYSIS W.R.T. SITE AREA……………………………………………29 3.1.8. AREA ANALYSIS W.R.T. T.B.U.A………………………………………………..29 3.1.9. VEHICULAR MOVEMENT………………………………………………………..29 3.1.10. PARKING…………………………………………………………………………..29 3.1.11. MOVEMENT ABOUT THE SITE…………………………………………………30 3.1.14. MAIN BLOCK PROFILE………………………………………………………….31 3.1.15. STRUCTURE AND MATERIALS………………………………………………...31 3.1.16. PLANNING………………………………………………………………………...32 3.1.17. GROUND FLOOR PLAN………………………………………………………….33 3.1.18. FIRST FLOOR PLAN……………………………………………………………...34 3.1.19. SECOND FLOOR PLAN…………………………………………………………..35 3.1.20. ADMINISTRATION…………………………………………………………….…36 3.1.21. CONFERENCE……………………………………………………………………..36 3.1.22. STUDIOS…………………………………………………………………………...36
  9. 9. 3.1.23. WORKSHOPS……………………………………………………………………..36 3.1.24. EXHIBITON……………………………………………………………………….36 3.1.25. AUDITORIUM…………………………………………………………………….37 3.1.26. INTERIOR CHARACTER………………………………………………………...37 3.1.27. ARCHITECTURAL OBSERVATIONS & INFERENCES…………………..…..38 3.2 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, GANDHINAGAR……………………….…40 3.2.1 PROJECT BRIEF……………………………………………………………….…40 3.2.2. LOCATION…………………………………………………………………….…40 3.2.3. ADJOINING AREAS………………………………………………………….…40 3.2.4. APPROACH……………………………………………………………………....40 3.2.5. SITE ZONING………………………………………………………………….…41 3.2.6. SITE PLAN…………………………………………………………………….….41 3.2.7. AREA ANALYSIS W.R.T. SITE AREA………………………………………....42 3.2.8. AREA ANALYSIS W.R.T. T.B.U.A………………………………………….….42 3.2.9. SITE VIEW…………………………………………………………………….….42 3.2.10. SITE SECTION……………………………………………………………….…43 3.2.11. CONCEPT……………………………………………………………………..…43 3.2.12. CONCEPTUAL IDEAS ON CLIMATOLOGY AND LANDSCAPE…….….…44 3.2.13. PLANNING……………………………………………………………………….44 3.2.14. MATERIALS USED…………………………………………………….………..44 3.2.15. PARKING……………………………………………………………………….…45 3.2.16. GROUND FLOOR PLAN (PHASE- I)……………………………………………45 3.2.17. FIRST FLOOR PLAN……………………………………………………………..46 3.2.18. GROUND FLOOR PLAN (PHASE- II)…………………………………………...48 3.2.19. FIRST FLOOR PLAN (PHASE- II)……………………………………………….48 3.2.20. ACADEMIC BLOCK……………………………………………………………...49 3.2.21. COURTYARD……………………………………………………………………...49 3.2.22. DISCUSSION AREA……………………………………………………………….49 3.2.23. FACULTY ROOMS………………………………………………………………...49
  10. 10. 3.2.24. MATERIALS USED…………………………………………………………50 3.2.25. PARKING…………………………………………………………………….50 3.2.26. FUTURE EXPANSION………………………………………………………50 3.2.27. ARCHITECTURAL OBSERVATIONS & INFERENCES………………….51 3.3 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, BENGALURU……………………………….52 3.3.1 PROJECT BRIEF……………………………………………………………………52 3.3.2. LOCATION…………………………………………………………………………52 3.3.3. ADJOINING AREAS……………………………………………………………….52 3.3.4. APPROACH…………………………………………………………………………52 3.3.5. SITE ZONING…………………………………….………………………………...53 3.3.6. SITE PLAN………………………………………………………………………….53 3.3.7. CONCEPTS…………………………………………………………………………53 3.3.8. GROUND FLOOR PLAN…………………………………………………………..54 3.3.9. FIRST FLOOR PLAN………………………………………………………………54 3.3.10. SECOND FLOOR PLAN………………………………………………………….55 3.3.11. THIRD FLOOR PLAN…………………………………………………………….55 3.3.12. ARCHITECTURAL OBSERVATIONS & INFERENCES……………………….56 CHAPTER 4: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS……………………………………………….57 4.1 COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS…………………………………………………………57 4.2. AREA PROGRAMME………………………………………………………………...58 CHAPTER 5: SITE ANALYSIS…………………………………………………………….61 5.1. ABOUT BHOPAL……………………………………………………………………..61 5.2. CLIMATIC CONDITIONS……………………………………………………………61 5.2.1. CLIMATIC FACTOR……………………………………………………………...61 5.2.2. CLIMATIC RESPONSE…………………………………………………………...62 5.3 ABOUT SITE……………………………………………………………………………64 5.3.1. LOCATION………………………………………………………………………..64
  11. 11. 5.3.2. ACCESSIBILITY…………………………………………………………………...64 5.3.3. CONNECTIVITY…………………………………………………………………...64 5.3.4. TOPOGRAPHY OF THE SITE……………………………………………………..64 5.3.5. SOIL CONDITION………………………………………………………………….64 5.3.6. SITE AND ITS FEATURES………………………………………………………...64 5.3.7. SITE BYELAWS……………………………………………………………………64 5.3.8. SWOT ANALYSIS………………………………………………………………….64 CHAPTER 6: CONCEPTUALS……………………………………………………………..67 CHAPTER 7: DESIGN………………………………………………………………………68 CHAPTER 8: BIBLIOGRAPHY…………………………………………………………….72 List of Figures Fig. 1 NID Ahmedabad Entrance Gate………………………………………………………..1 Fig 2 Old Image of NID Ahmedabad………………………………………………………….2 Fig 3 Industrial Design………………………………………………………………………...3 Fig 4 Communication Design…………………………………………………………………3 Fig 5 Textile Design……………………………………………………………………….......3 Fig 6 Brics Nation GDP……………………………………………………………………….5 Fig 7 Comparison of Different Govt. Established Institutes………………………………….6 Fig 8 Design Distribution Geographically…………………………………………………….7 Fig 9 Statistics 1……………………………………………………………………………….8 Fig 10 Statistics 2……………………………………………………………………………..8 Fig 11 Statistics 3……………………………………………………………………………..9 Fig 12 Make in India Logo…………………………………………………………………..10 Fig 13 World Bank GDP Statistics………………………………………………………..…10 Fig 14 General Work Flow at Work Area……………………………………………………15
  12. 12. Fig 15 Activity Flow at Textile Workshop…………………………………………………..18 Fig 16 Activity Flow at Painting Workshop…………………………………………………20 Fig 17 Activity Flow at Photography Workshop…………………………………………….21 Fig 18 Activity Flow at Animation Workshop………………………………………………22 Fig 19 Activity Flow at Jewellery Workshop………………………………………………..23 Fig 20 Google Earth Image of NID Ahmedabad…………………………………………….27 Fig 21 Site Zoning……………………………………………………………………………28 Fig 22 Site Access……………………………………………………………………………29 Fig 23 Parking Area at NID Campus………………………………………………………...30 Fig 24 Pathways……………………………………………………………………………...30 Fig 25 Open Spaces…………………………………………………………………………..30 Fig 26 Landscaping…………………………………………………………………………..30 Fig 27 NID Initial Plans & Respective Section………………………………………………31 Fig 28 Section Through Workshop at NID…………………………………………………..31 Fig 29 Grid Pattern…………………………………………………………………………...31 Fig 30 Courtyard Pattern……………………………………………………………………..32 Fig 31 Grid Module………………………………………………………………………….32 Fig 32 Longitudinal Section Through Courtyard……………………………………………33 Fig 33 Natural Lights in Studio……………………………………………………………...36 Fig 34 Informal Nature of Studios…………………………………………………………...36 Fig 35 Full Wall Windows in Workshops……………………………………………………36 Fig 36 Display Area in Glass………………………………………………………………...37 Fig 37 Natural Diffused Light Is Allowed in Audi…………………………………………..37 Fig 38 Full Glass Partition Wall in Library………………………………………………….37 Fig 39 Open to Sky in Various Parts…………………………………………………………37 Fig 40 Spiral Staircase Connecting Studio & Workshop…………………………………….37 Fig 41 Main Entrance to NID Campus……………………………………………………….37 Fig 42 Aesthetics Depressed…………………………………………………………………37 Fig 43 Well Proportioned Massing…………………………………………………………..38 Fig 44 Landscaped Pathway………………………………………………………………….38
  13. 13. Fig 45 Google Earth Image of NID Gandhinagar……………………………………………40 Fig 46 Planning Concepts……………………………………………………………………43 Fig 47 Grid Pattern of Academic Block……………………………………………………..44 Fig 48 Academic Block Is Based on Cluster Form, Interconnected & Phased Development……………………………………………….44 Fig 49 Front Elevation of NID Gandhinagar Academic Block………………………………44 Fig 50 Form of The Building………………………………………………………………...45 Fig 51 Entrance Not Emphasized…………………………………………………………….49 Fig 52 Outer Environment Merged with Inner Environment………………………………..49 Fig 53 Courtyard……………………………………………………………………………..49 Fig 54 Roof Covering Does Not Permit Vertical Expansion………………………………..50 Fig 55 Openings on The Roof Gives A Wonderful Pattern of Light Which Falls in Courtyard…………………………………………………………...50 Fig 56 Google Earth Image of NID Bengaluru Campus……………………………………..52 Fig 57 Site Zoning……………………………………………………………………………53 Fig 58 Circular Corridor……………………………………………………………………...53 Fig 59 Bird’s Eye View of The Campus……………………………………………………..54 Fig 60 Night View of The Campus…………………………………………………………..54 Fig 61 Main Entrance………………………………………………………………………...54 Fig 62 Night View of Amphitheatre…………………………………………………………55 Fig 63 Oat & Waterbody……………………………………………………………………..55 Fig 64 Main Entrance Ramp…………………………………………………………………55 Fig 65 Upper Lake…………………………………………………………………………...61 Fig 66 Lower Lake…………………………………………………………………………..61 Fig 67 View of Upper Lake and Hilly Vindhya Terrain…………………………………….61 Fig 68 Climatic Variations…………………………………………………………………..61 Fig 69 Temperature Graphs………………………………………………………………….62 Fig 70 Response of External Surfaces During Day Time……………………………………62 Fig 71 Response of External Surfaces During Night Time………………………………….63 Fig 72 Evaporative Cooling………………………………………………………………….63
  14. 14. Fig 73 Wind Control…………………………………………………………………………63 Fig 74 Wind Control…………………………………………………………………………63 Fig 75 Sound Control………………………………………………………………………..63 Fig 76 Dust Control………………………………………………………………………….63 Fig 77 Key Plan of Site………………………………………………………………………64 Fig 78 Google Earth Image of Site…………………………………………………………..64 Fig 79 Deep Medium Black Soil…………………………………………………………….64 Fig 80 Sun Path Diagram…………………………………………………………………….65 Fig 81 Site Plan………………………………………………………………………………65 Fig 82 SWOT Analysis………………………………………………………………………66
  15. 15. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 1 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 1.1 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN The National Institute of Design (NID) is a multidisciplinary institute in the field of design education and research. Its design education programmes have also earned their place in the top 25 European and Asian educational programmes in the world. By an Act of Parliament, in July 2014, the institute has been declared as an Institution of National Importance by the NID Act (No.18 of 2014) and has come into force with effect from 16th September, 2014. An experience of more than Five Decades in the field of Design Education, Research, Application Of Advanced Teaching Methodologies, And Unparalleled Design Research Projects have together crowned the National Institute of Design (NID) with International repute. It has been recognized as a Scientific and Industrial Research Organization by the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. From being a Single Campus institute at Ahmedabad, NID has grown into A Multicampus Institute with a National And International Profile. NID now has two extension campuses—the Post Graduate Campus at Gandhinagar and the R&D Campus at Bengaluru. Recently, the new NID’s have been established at Kurukshetra & Vijayawada , The institutes functions as an Autonomous body under the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, of the Government of India. The institute offers three main courses, all of which follow the two semester per year pattern. • Bachelor of Design (B.Des) • Master of Design (M.Des) • Graduate Diploma Programme in Design (GDPD) • Post Graduate Diploma Programme in Design (PGDPD) Fig. 1 NID AHMEDABAD ENTRANCE GATE
  16. 16. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 2 1.2 HISTORY OF NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN NID was instituted at a time when the need for design intervention as an important catalyst for expanding quality industrial production and enhancing communication was recognized. Design inputs for the industrial sector was recognized as a key competency factor for securing and improving the quality of life of the mass of Indians. Eminent American designers and educationists, Charles and Ray Eames, were invited by the Government of India to suggest the philosophical, institutional and programmatic aspects of how design could be harnessed for public good. Their recommendations led to the setting up of the National Institute of Design (NID) at Ahmedabad in 1961. On April 7, 1958, the Eameses presented the India Report to the Government of India. The Eames Report defined the underlying spirit that would lead to the founding of NID and beginning of design education in India. The Report recommended a problem-solving design consciousness that linked learning with actual experience and suggested that the designer could be a bridge between tradition and modernity. Gautam Sarabhai revived the philosophy of the Bauhaus design movement which was Learning By Doing. This unique curriculum and revolutionary educational philosophy remain part of NID to the present day. Fig 2 OLD IMAGE OF NID AHMEDABAD
  17. 17. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 3 1.3 PROGRAMMES OFFERED The Institute offers professional education programmes at Undergraduate and Post Graduate level with 5 faculty streams with 21 diverse design disciplines. Industrial Design • Product Design • Furniture & Interior Design • Ceramic & Glass Design • Toy & Game Design • Transportation & Automobile Design • Design for Retail Experience Communication Design • Graphic Design • Animation Film Design • Film & Video Communication • Photography Design • Exhibition Design Textile and Apparel Design • Textile Design • Apparel Design and Merchandising • Lifestyle Accessory Design IT Integrated Design • New Media Design • Information & Interface Design • Digital Game Design • Design for Digital Experience Interdisciplinary Design • Interaction Design • Universal Design • Strategic Design Management. Fig 3 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN Fig 4 COMMUNICATION DESIGN Fig 5 TEXTILE DESIGN
  18. 18. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 4 1.4. NEED & IMPORTANCE OF NID 1.1.1. WHAT IS DESIGN & WHAT DESIGN CAN DO? We experience design every day, in every moment that we live, right from our bathrooms to boardrooms, devices to public spaces. There is not a SINGLE element that is untouched by Design. Design is the term we use to describe both the Process and the Result of giving Tangible form to human ideas. PROCESS TOOL CONTRIBUTES
  19. 19. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 5 1.1.2. DESIGN AS A STRATEGY FOR A DEVELOPING ECONOMY  Design can stimulate developing countries from "technology-stagnation".  'Design' talents within the country are essential to absorb the continuous flow of new technologies from developed countries and adapt them to local conditions of manufacture.  Design can help in bringing out products to satisfy cultural and social needs of our population.  Design can play a vital role in searching for alternatives and innovating usable products (Eco Friendly), making use of new energy sources.  Information and communication design' can play a significant role in social, cultural and scientific education of the masses. Fig 6 BRICS NATION GDP Source: INDIA DESIGN REPORT
  20. 20. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 6 1.1.3. LACK OF DESIGN INSTITUTES OF NATIONAL IMPORTANCE. SOURCE: INDIA DESIGN REPORT  It is peculiar that for such a huge population, a large part of the population has been largely been ignorant of the benefits of design, and hence the country as a whole suffered its disadvantages.  The Indian market continues to remain flooded with foreign products that in many cases meet consumer aspirations but not their needs. This ‘design dependency has made our products less competitive in the world market and has adversely influenced the export performance. Fig 7 COMPARISION OF DIFFERENT GOVT. ESTABLISHED INSTITUTES
  21. 21. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 7 1.1.4 GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF DESIGN INDUSTRY SOURCE: INDIA DESIGN REPORT • It can be seen that the major concentration of design companies is in four urban areas viz. Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore and Pune. • All these four cities are industrially active and are home to the majority of well known Indian companies. • The presence of leading design education institutions in these cities is also another reason for concentration of design companies in these cities. Fig 8 DESIGN DISTRIBUTION GEOGRAPHICALLY
  22. 22. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 8 1.1.5. DESIGN INDUSTRY STATISTICS 1.1.1.1 DESIGNERS IN VARIOUS DESIGN DISCIPLINES • The Charts shows the Maximum concentration of designer is in the area of Architecture as compared to various Design Disciplines. • The obvious reason is that Architecture as a domain of study and practice has been well entrenched for a long time. 1.1.1.2. EMPLOYMENT DISTRIBUTION OF DESIGNERS SOURCE: INDIA DESIGN REPORT 2015 Fig 9 STATISTICS 1 Figure 10 STATISTICS 2
  23. 23. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 9 1.1.1.3. DESIGN EDUCATION - NUMBER OF DESIGN PROGRAMS  Fashion and Animation tops comparative student enrollment within design.  Animation is growing at a very fast rate primarily for two reasons. The first reason is establishment of animation as a viable career option and second being the abundance availability of animation education in cities of all sizes.  Similarly, for Fashion Design it is the availability of instruction in this area in all geographies.  Fashion and Animation has seen a tremendous growth in urban and semi urban areas where institutes are offering certificate and diploma courses. SOURCE: INDIA DESIGN REPORT 2015 SOURCE: INDIA DESIGN REPORT 2015 Fig 11 STATISTICS 3 Fig 12 STATISTICS 3
  24. 24. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 10 1.1.6. MAKE IN INDIA: MAKING IT HAPPEN BY DESIGN Make in India Initiative was launched globally in September, 2014 as a part of the Government of India’s renewed focus on stimulating the country’s Manufacturing Sector. It was great to see the positive response given by Foreign Investors (MNCs), Indian companies and Startups in every sector. The campaign has been concentrated to fulfill the purpose of Job Creation, Enforcement to Secondary and Tertiary sector, Boosting National Economy, Converting the India to a Self- Reliant country and to give the Indian economy Global Recognition. Use of advance technologies right from Concept design, Analysis to Manufacturing plays important role in achieving Manufacturing excellence and developing innovative products. Design is integral part of the manufacturing; make in India is not just a manufacturing in India but also design in India. MNCs are not just outsourcing low end design or product development work in India now but in last two years more than 1000 R&D labs have started in India to develop better products for worldwide audience. After the launch of Make in India initiative, INDIA HAS EMERGED AS THE FASTEST GROWING MAJOR ECONOMY WITH GDP GROWTH RATE ABOVE 7.6% IN 2015-16 and projected to grow above 7% till 2020 as per International Monitory Fund (IMF). Fig 12 MAKE IN INDIA LOGO Fig 13 WORLD BANK GDP STATISTICS
  25. 25. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 11 1.4 AIM To Design a new NID campus & & contributing in economic growth. 1.5 OBJECTIVES  To study the existing patterns and activities of Design Institutions.  To study and understand the Indian market and the impact of design education in the process of nation-building.  To understand the need, requirement and qualities of a Design Institution.  To provide an appropriate space for learning.  To study the merits and demerits of current design schools. 1.6 SCOPE  Studying and experiencing the working of an institution.  Understanding the modulation of campus designs w.r.t site planning.  Finding the best Solution In terms of site and context responsive architecture. 1.7 LIMITATIONS  The Project in no way aims at challenging the education system of India.  The thesis does not deal with the economics of the project.  The construction details would not be dealt in minute detail.  The services would not be dealt in minute detail. 1.8 ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE  The Educational Sector Is Undergoing A Rapid Transformation & Adopting Multidisciplinary approach towards Education.  This Institute becomes a Tangible Icon of this Wave of Change that is sweeping the society.
  26. 26. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 12 1.9 METHODOLOGY OF STUDY
  27. 27. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 13 CHAPTER 2: LITERATURE STUDY 2.1. BUILDING SPACE REQUIREMENTS ARE CLASSIFIED INTO: INSTRUCTIONAL AREA: This includes classroom/tutorial rooms, drawing halls, laboratories including computer center, workshops, and library instructional resource production center and exhibition hall/auditorium. ADMINISTRATIVE AREAS: It comprises of principal’s room, staff room, office and conference, confidential room, estate office and reception lounge. AMENITIES: This includes student and staff rooms, indoor games, sports and recreation center, N.C.C, N.S.S, canteen, cooperative store, and dispensary and alumni association. 2.1.1. ADMINISTRATIVE AREAS 2.1.2. INSTRUCTIONAL AREA The requirements for instruction of different types of classroom, lecture, tutorial, and drawing would depend on the curriculum structure. The breakdown of the curriculum in terms of the instructional time of each type of instructional activities has therefore to be determined initially.  CLASSROOMS AND DRAWING HALLS The unit area to be provided could be stated on a room wise basis. Rooms for bigger class sizes requiring smaller unit area and room for smaller size; a higher unit area following are the desirable & minimum norms. Norms (in sq. m / student)
  28. 28. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 14  WORK SPACES The most important thing for the design institute is open mind, creative thinking, not only for the student but also for the teachers, an environment which helps person to give his best, because design is an attitude, which differs from person to person. 2.2. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS  The space should be arranged with sufficient imagination so that it is flexible & allows the teacher to vary the curriculum from year to year. Rooms therefore should be conceived as a series of work centres in which activities with different kinds of materials can be carried forward.  There is much need of display space for finished work.  Windows should provide adequate light & be high enough for storage & counter space underneath. Ceilings & or / walls should be acoustically treated.  It is preferable to have vinyl asbestos floor in the general art area; in the ceramics area terrazzo or hardened concrete floor is suggested. Finishes should be easily washed & maintained & resistant to oils & heat.  Room for bulk storage & storage of papers, illustrative materials, and models, cardboard, finished & unfinished projects will have to be supplied.  The industrial arts departments should be isolated form quieter areas of building with a service road provided nearby.
  29. 29. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 15  One storey structures on grade are most common, though mezzanine space is often developed for storage or seminar use.  Basically major elements are specially shops like woodworking, electrical, metals, auto or combined general shops. Additionally drafting rooms are common as well as supporting classrooms, offices & sometimes locker rooms.  The layout of any shop should follow the logic of its equipment use & its relationship to electrical & mechanical services.  Several things must be considered such as special code & safety concerns, good lighting, sawdust collecting systems, overhead hoist systems, exhaust ducts & the ability to get large supplies in, out stored. o  Area for fixed machine, storage for tool and other equipment, workroom for workshop in charge, worktables, storage for raw material, demonstration area, first aid box, fire safety provision, black board, wash basin, tool panel.  Machine should be placed 1 m clear distance from all wall or column.  Flooring and electricity supply and important consideration are must be according to equipment. Fig 14 GENERAL WORK FLOW AT WORK AREA
  30. 30. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 16 2.3. WOOD WORKSHOP 2.4. METAL WORKSHOP NORMS: 4 sq. m / student for shops requiring work bench and small-scale machinery. PURPOSE  Demonstrating, guiding, evaluating by teacher, shop floor activities related to skill learning, assembling, dismantling, fabricating, erecting etc. by students. Experimenting, investing, discussing, measuring, and testing by students.  The space requirements of laboratories varies from one laboratory to another. The major determinants are the number of students working at a time and the size of the equipments. In some cases the first factor is the basis and in other in which the equipments are of large size, equipment is the deciding factor.  Norms of 4-8 per student and 15 in special cases are therefore applied and area of each laboratory determined applying to the norms relevant to that particular laboratory.
  31. 31. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 17  The prescribed norms correspond to the model curriculum experiments and equipment’s. Provision of extra built in shortage is desirable.  Use of versatile training system in place of huge conventional equipment can reduce the space requirements. This should be appropriately considered in the application of norms determining or evaluating and adequacy of laboratory space. 2.5. CERAMIC WORKSHOP ACTIVITIES  Clay is worked by several methods including hand modelling, throwing on potter’s wheel & casting. After pieces have dried, they are fired to form bisque, glazed & fired again.  A comprehensive program includes clay preparation, forming techniques, decorating, fire procedures & glaze formulation.  Mould making is an activity related to pottery reproduction. Casting of clay in ceramic moulds is a repetitive process which relates more to commercial manufacturing. PHYSICAL REQUIREMENT Common area:  Work area for designing, forming & glazing. However, kilns which generate large amount of heat should be separated from general work area.  Materials often come in large containers so storage rooms should be convenient to service entrance. Room surfaces should be non-porous & easily cleaned. Sloped floors with drain are desirable. Storage for drying of pottery is required in an area separate from general work spaces.  Electric kilns generate low amount of heat & may be used for bisque & low fire glazing. Gas kilns are high heat units used for high fires & are in demand where more sophisticated programs are offered. FURNISHING EQUIPMENT Major items of equipment includes: wedging boards, kiln carts, electric ceramic kilns, gas ceramic kiln, enamel kilns, portable clay storage cabinets, damp proof cabinets, drying cabinets, potter’s
  32. 32. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 18 wheels, worktables, sinks & spray booths. EQUIPMENTS Pug mill (1.0 X 1.0) Ball mill (1.5 X 1.0) Working benches Potter’s wheel (1.2 X 1.0) Demonstration area Furnace, kiln, oven, sink Instructor area 2.6. TEXTILE LAB ACTIVITIES Loom weaving, tapestry work, batik, tie-dye, macramé, soft sculpture, banners, fabric collages, needle point, stitchery & sewing. PHYSICAL REQUIREMENT The general work area should be flexible to allow frequent changing needs. Some activities will require a permanent set up such as floor looms & sewing machines & these may be installed in alcoves. The predominant arrangement will be one of movable worktables & counters which can be adapted for a variety of crafts. Storage should be provided within common room. FURNISHING EQUIPMENT Fig 15 ACTIVITY FLOW AT TEXTILE WORKSHOP
  33. 33. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 19 The basic furnishings consist of workbenches, tables & stools. Much of the specialized equipment is portable. Foot powered looms occupy considerable floor space when in operation but may be moved & stored when not in use. Table looms, rug looms & tapestry frames can be utilized on table tops & stored when not in use. Heavy duty sewing machines are essential in a textile program. Enamel pans, hot plates 7 drying racks are necessary. Textile weaving Block printing table (1.52m X 2.5m) Instructor room Demonstrator room Store Handloom 2.7. PAINTING WORKSHOP ACTIVITIES In addition to painting & drawing in a variety of media, the graphic arts programme includes design projects, drafting, wooden linoleum block printing, etching, lithography & silk screen painting. PHYSICAL REQUIREMENT The general area used for graphics can be typical studio space. Painted block or panel walls & acoustic ceilings are adequate. Surfaces should be washable. Acid resistant, impervious floors such as treated concrete or quarry tile are very desirable in graphic arts area. Use high quality resilient flooring throughout. Natural north light is desirable for painting & drawing areas, as is convenient access to an outdoor painting court. Toxic chemicals are used in etching & silk screen process & for safety they should be used away from other activities. An outdoor area for cleaning silk screens or an acid room is desirable. Storage may be required in a general storage area with secure provision for acid storage.
  34. 34. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 20 FURNISHING EQUIPMENT Major items of equipment include printing presses, block printing presses, drawing tables, paper cutters, easels, paper storage cabinets, chairs & stools, display cases, worktables with surfaces for cutting, drying, racks for prints, slatted storage for canvases, a slide projector with screen, portable easels & work sinks. Compressor (0.75m X 1.2m) Spray painting Drying area Store 2.8. PHOTOGRAPHY LABORATORY The process of photography consists of recording an image on a film and its development & printing. The sequence of operations is as follows: Shooting Outdoor / Indoor Developing Process Dry area (dark room): Here enlargements are made on paper, film is loaded in cans. Mixing: Here chemicals are store in bulk and mixed with desired use. Wet Area: Here films, paper prints are developed. All processes requiring stored in bulk & mixed for desired use. Developing tank, working space (2.4 X max. length of print), requirement (black out) Enlarger, working space (1.5 X max. length of print), requirement (black out) (Projection / selection): A small projection place of work is seen, use of chemicals carried on here. (Finishing / mounting room): These are areas where finished prints, slides are mounted, glazed or otherwise Prepared for presentations. Fig 16 ACTIVITY FLOW AT PAINTING WORKSHOP
  35. 35. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 21 2.9. PRINTING STUDIO Area for fixed machinery Offset printing room Camera room Printing process room Computer room Paper store Instructor room Demonstration room Binding section 2.10. ANIMATION & FILM MAKING STUDIO Computer animation CEL animation Computer (graphic card) Drawing, Shooting Work table, potter wheel, clay mixture, and oven for baking, storage for raw material, storage for finished goods, wet area (sink) for clay mixture, instructor cabin & demonstrator area. The layout of various types of animation: Motion or clay animation: Objects are placed under camera, lit by artificial/natural source Fig 17 ACTIVITY WORK FLOW AT PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
  36. 36. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 22 and then Photographed with their positions slightly changed. Cell animation: An animation stand is a table above or below, on which the art work is placed and the camera mounted on Top shoots one frame at a time. Computer animation: It is a very new & fast changing animation technique and is very expensive. But it can be housed with animation area with consoles substituting tables & the camera taking feed via cables. 2.11. JEWELLERY & ART METAL ACTIVITIES Processes include designing & construction with sheets, wires & tubes, welding, soldering & casting. Design & construction of jewellery may require the addition of stone settings & colouring. Additional activities in this include procedures for lapidary (cutting & polishing stone) & metal enamelling (fusion colour to metal in a kiln). PHYSICAL REQUIREMENT Certain precautions are to be taken & should be exercised in planning. Welding & hot metal casting should be set aside in an alcove with hardened concrete floor. Special gas jets may be installed for fine soldering. Enamelling involves the use of acids, kilns & blow torches, hence the area where the enamel is applied & dried should be apart from other areas to prevent spreading metal dust or jarring enamels that are drying. FURNISHING EQUIPMENT Much of jewellery work can be done at standard work counters with accessory v-blocks, anvils, gas fixtures & vises attached. Alternatively 2 or 4 workbenches can be provided in the general work space. Slab saws & flat laps are floor mounted items. In a large shop separate lapidary units for cutting, grinding, polishing & buffing are preferable. Buffing machines, drill presses, trim saws, centrifugal & vacuum casting machines, faceting machines, grinding Fig 18 ACTIVITY FLOW AT ANIMATION WORKSHOP
  37. 37. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 23 arbores, burn out kilns, sanders & gem tumblers can all be bench mounted. Lapidary equipment should be so placed as to facilitate the progression of operations from slabbing, trimming & grinding through polishing & faceting. 2.12. STUDIOS 2.13. DISPLAY AREA VISION & VIEWS  The normal limit of vision without moving the head is a cone of 40 degree. A picture, therefore, can only be comfortable viewed as whole from a distance of about double the diagonal.  It is generally accepted, though, that a distance equal to the diagonal will enable the viewer to appreciate the details of the pictures, but he will need to move his head to compass it all. Fig 19 ACTIVITY FLOW AT JEWELLERY WORKSHOP
  38. 38. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 24 VIEWING CONDITION Good viewing conditions when using Video Slide projector Overhead projector DEMONSTRATION Will usually require steeply raked floor to ensure good viewing to top of demonstration benches, relative cost of such auditoria with heavily serviced demonstration bodies. LIGHTNING Both artificial & natural lightning is required for a lecture room, care should be taken to avoid glare both direct and indirect. Light room windows if possible should come over person’s left shoulder windows not to be provided in front of instructor and black board. 2.14. CAMPUS DESIGN The institute desires the campus itself, to communicate briefly the following: The campus should emerge as a sensitively integrated environment, where the building, landscape, people in their activities gracefully co-exist & complement each other, in the harmonious manner. A real campus ought to be a closely knit infield cluster of buildings, with intimate pedestrian, open spaces, providing a unique environment for living and studying. PRINCIPLES OF CAMPUS DESIGN  Campus planning is the process that guides the design of the campus so that it is functional, flexible and beautiful.
  39. 39. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 25  A campus should be conceived as entity, an administration, and academic, physical units bringing together many functions into definable homogeneity.  A campus is a dynamic organism continually growing. It therefore calls for certain amount of flexibility as a guiding principle.  The pedestrian, the scholar, scientists, the professor all provide the common scale. Distances, heights, sizes of the spaces should be determined by the requirements of people on foot.  Campuses should design with full awareness of the climatic factors. A successful campus environment is sensitive in building of existing site, landscape character and the man-made structures that are introduced to it. FUNCTIONAL ASPECT The institutes are not ‘established’ they are ‘born’. They ‘grow’ & ‘mature’. Therefore, it is not a ‘rigid’ set of rules, but a flexible body which keeps on changing with time. RECREATIONAL SPACES A closed system becomes stagnant & it would be suicidal for an institute to close itself to the outside world. The spaces within like, amphitheatre, informal sitting around courts, pavilion, etc. can act as a platform for discussions.
  40. 40. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 26 CHAPTER 3: CASE STUDIES 3.1. N.I.D AHMEDABAD 3.2. N.I.D. GANDHINAGAR 3.3 N.I.D. BENGULURU
  41. 41. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 27 3.1 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, AHMEDABAD 3.1.1. PROJECT BRIEF Architect: Gautam Sarabhai & Charles Eames Client: Ministry of Commerce and Industry Site Area: 20 acres Built Up Area: 27,488 sq. m (approx.) Established in: 1961 Climate: Hot and dry summers and moderate winters 3.1.2. LOCATION National Institute of Design is a design school in Ahmedabad, located in Paldi in the new city area on the west bank of river Sabarmati, near the Sardar Patel Bridge. 3.1.3. ADJOINING AREAS The NID campus is surrounded by the Sabarmati River on one side, market on the second side, school on the third side and residential area on the fourth side. These buildings bear no particular style of architecture. 3.1.4. APPROACH There are two main approaches for entering the campus •For the institute block. •For the hostels and faculty residences. Fig 20 GOOGLE EARTH IMAGE OF NID AHMEDABAD
  42. 42. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 28 3.1.5. SITE ZONING The Site has been zoned from the main access in a hierarchy of Interaction > Educational > Recreational > Residential. Keeping in mind that Education being the major activity on site, it is placed near the main entrance for easy access & without disturbing the privacy of other areas. The shape of the site is such that it divides the site into two parts. The site is sloping towards the Sabarmati River. 3.1.6. SITE PLAN Fig 31 SITE ZONING Fig 22 SITE ACCESS
  43. 43. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 29 3.1.7. AREA ANALYSIS W.R.T. SITE AREA 3.1.8. AREA ANALYSIS W.R.T. T.B.U.A 3.1.9. VEHICULAR MOVEMENT Vehicular movement is restricted only till the entrance for the visitors. Students and faculty can take their vehicle to the residential areas & academic block by service road provided at the western side of the campus. Service entry is provided for the various workshops at the eastern side. Pedestrian and vehicular movement are not separated. 3.1.10. PARKING There is one covered parking for 2 wheelers for staff just at the entry point of the institute body. Fig 23 PARKING AREA AT NID CAMPUS
  44. 44. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 30 3.1.11. MOVEMENT ABOUT THE SITE Emphasis has been given on pedestrianizing the site, and one is encouraged to walk around the building and discover it slowly and steadily. 3.1.12. PATHWAY Pathways are narrow linear pedestrian path lined with trees on either side which keeps the pathway cool. The pathway is of hard ground and edges are defined by paved edge in brick. 3.1.13. SITE LANDSCAPE Landscape forms an important part of site. The building is bounded by an extensive green lawn on one side & trees, shrubs, etc. on the other which encourage free movement through it. Trees are planted along the periphery of the building which provides shade along the walkways in the ground floor. The building is partially visible through the foliage of trees. One side of the monument has been converted into the back drop for the open amphitheatre, which has become an area for many informal gatherings, features, seminars and cultural performances. Fig 24 PATHWAYS Fig 25 OPEN SPACES Fig 26 LANDSCAPING
  45. 45. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 31 Large trees protect the building from the harsh sun rays and thus, provides shade on surface glazing and courtyards. Winds from the riverside is invited in the studios and workshops from the windows & terraces by the adjustable glazing. 3.1.14. MAIN BLOCK PROFILE 3.1.15. STRUCTURE AND MATERIALS Construction with exposed bricks catches everyone’s attention. The structural formation is grid. Basic dimension of 1 grid is 6.15m x 6.15m Centre to Centre. Grid – 12.3m X 12.3m, 6.15m X 6.15 m. This enables structural perfection, and also allows freedom in quick flexibility, growth and change. Fig 27 NID INITIAL PLANS & RESPECTIVE SECTION Fig 28 SECTION THROUGH WORKSHOP AT NID Fig 29 GRID PATTERN
  46. 46. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 32 The external cladding is prefabricated and consist of heat resisting glass in metal frames in workshops and in rosewood frame in studios. The ground level is 2.51 metres below the high flood level recorded in 1875. Hence the entire building is on stilts, the main floor standing 3.24 metres above the ground level. Thus 9570 sq. metres of floor space becomes available on the ground floor, which is profitably utilized as public area, common-rooms for staff members and students, canteens, and for the storage of raw materials such as logs of wood, iron, steel, etc. not likely to get damaged by the occasional flood. 3.1.16. PLANNING The architect’s main emphasis has been on structural Clarity leading to functional perfection in the largely complex spaces like studios and workshops. The whole process of building the physical form around two main courts and planning the grid based on function makes the building easy to use and understand. The massive blocks of NID devoid of any aesthetically features, suggest an introvert planning. Fig 30 COURTYARD PATTERN Fig 31 GRID MODULE
  47. 47. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 33 3.1.17. GROUND FLOOR PLAN Fig 52 LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH COURTYARD
  48. 48. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 34 3.1.18. FIRST FLOOR PLAN
  49. 49. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 35 3.1.19. SECOND FLOOR PLAN
  50. 50. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 36 3.1.20. ADMINISTRATION At the G.F, separated from the rest of academic areas. 4 ½’’ brick wall and wooden partitions provides flexible spaces for the staff. 3.1.21. CONFERENCE Placed between the exhibitions and faculty cabins. This seating act both for formal discussions & informal area for faculty members. 3.1.22. STUDIOS All studios have been designed specially depending on the specific requirement of the courses. All of them are on the external walls and well-lit with natural light. The studios have informalness of the working methodology which is very important basic of the design education. There are well maintained permanent exhibitor spaces both sides of the design street, separate spaces have been provided for separate disciplines. 3.1.23. WORKSHOPS All workshops have North-South orientation. Workshops of wood and metal have double height clearance. There are sliding panels starting from skirting to sill height which provide sufficient natural light and also helps merging the mechanical interior with outside skirts. Due to large openings there is good light and ventilation. Moreover these are connected to open courts which further provides light and ventilation and also acts as outdoor work areas. 3.1.24. EXHIBITON Exhibitions in glass walls. Used to display the latest products by the institute, display of posters & other written materials regarding achievements of the institute in various fields in order to tell the visitor what this institute is all about. Light filtering into the semi dark ground floor area, creating the play of light and shadow. Fig 33 NATURAL LIGHTS IN STUDIO Fig 36 INFORMAL NATURE OF STUDIOS Fig 35 FULL WALL WINDOWS IN WORKSHOPS
  51. 51. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 37 3.1.25. AUDITORIUM Auditorium is placed on the second floor, its capacity is about 230 people, it could be directly approached by main staircase from the foyer, but due to its location it’s become a private entry it is fully air conditioned and used for cultural program, lecture, display, etc. 3.1.26. INTERIOR CHARACTER A feeling of informal atmosphere has been achieved with a low ceiling for a large open entrance space. Materials in exposed form thus provided under lit surface giving a feeling of intimacy. An informal set up of reception and waiting space with informal rural kinds. Fig 36 DISPLAY AREA IN GLASS Fig 37 NATURAL DIFFUESD LIGHT IS ALLOWED IN AUDI Fig 38 FULL GLASS PATITION WALL IN LIBRARY Fig 39 OPEN TO SKY IN VARIOUS PARTS Fig 40 SPIRAL STAIRCASE CONNECTING STUDIO & WORKSHOP Fig 41 MAIN ENTRANCE TO NID CAMPUS Fig 42 AESTHETICS DEPRESSED
  52. 52. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 38 Fig 43 WELL PROPORTIONED MASSING Fig 44 LANDSCAPED PATHWAY 3.1.27. ARCHITECTURAL OBSERVATIONS & INFERENCES  All the workshops and laboratories, administrative offices and a showroom are located on the first floor.  Each technology (such as wood, metal, plastics, ceramics and glass, printing and photography) is assigned a separate wing connected to the central core (which can be used for product assembly) but separated from each other by courts.  Open to sky terraces in between the workshops provide outdoor work areas.  Provision has been made for expansion, not only of each workshop but for three new workshops in the future.  The showroom can be reached directly from the main road on the north by a narrow bridge for pedestrians.  Drafting studios, seminar rooms and the library are on the mezzanine floor. Double glazing between the studios and the workshops enables students to literally see what is actually happening on the production floor, without however, being disturbed by the noise from the machines.  Spiral staircases from the studios provide direct access to the workshops.
  53. 53. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 39  The staggering of the studios to the east and the west permits open planning and at the same time ensures privacy.  The library has a lounge with open book-stacks for browsing and a separate area for quiet study.  Garden terraces attached to the library overlook the river to the north.  All workshops and drafting studios have a north-south orientation in order to avoid direct sun- light in the work areas.  The core of the building is structurally separated from the workshops, so as to eliminate vibration and material-borne noise being carried from the workshops to the studios.
  54. 54. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 40 3.2 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, GANDHINAGAR 3.2.1 PROJECT BRIEF Architect: Sen Kapadia & Banker Architects Client: Ministry of Commerce and Industry Site Area: 16 acres Built Up Area: 16,137 sq. m (approx.) Established in: 19th July 2004 Climate: Hot and dry summers and moderate winters. 3.2.2. LOCATION National Institute of Design is a post graduate campus, an extension campus of the parent institute in Ahmedabad, located in Gandhinagar bypass road near infocity. 3.2.3. ADJOINING AREAS The NID Gandhinagar campus is surrounded by Information and Library Network Centre in north side, DAIICT in west side, commercial building in south side and vacant land in east side. 3.2.4. APPROACH There are two main approaches for entering the campus •West gate to the institute block which is proposed to be the main entrance to the campus from DAIICT Road. •South gate to the hostels and faculty residences which is presently the main entrance to the campus from Gandhinagar bypass Road. Fig 45 GOOGLE EARTH IMAGE OF NID GANDHINAGAR
  55. 55. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 41 3.2.5. SITE ZONING The campus is divided into 4 zones. The Institute zone, consisting of all the workshops, laboratories, classrooms, lecture rooms, studios, offices, resource center, showrooms, etc. The Residential zone, consisting of student hostels and faculty residences. The Interaction zone (Convocation plaza) consisting of auditorium, OAT, design showroom, etc. Old academic zone which is presently serving as carpentry workshop, gymnasium, music which is proposed to be the hostel in phase II construction. 3.2.6. SITE PLAN
  56. 56. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 42 3.2.7. AREA ANALYSIS W.R.T. SITE AREA 3.2.8. AREA ANALYSIS W.R.T. T.B.U.A 3.2.9. SITE VIEW SOURCE : : INDIAN ARCHITECT & BUILDER APRIL 2006
  57. 57. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 43 3.2.10. SITE SECTION SOURCE : : INDIAN ARCHITECT & BUILDER APRIL 2006 3.2.11. CONCEPT The campus seems to evolve along an organic river flow, the river being the main access road, and its tributaries - the involving pedestrian routes. The outer street having a series of landscaped and variable built forms, whereas an inner street will be north-lit route with fountains and open spaces topped with a shaping device. The internal street provides connectivity to various academic disciplines and is interspersed with foyers and courtyards for spontaneous informal assembling, which are covered with landmark signage and display potentials. Fig 46 PLANNING CONCEPTS
  58. 58. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 44 3.2.12. CONCEPTUAL IDEAS ON CLIMATOLOGY AND LANDSCAPE Landscape and natural forces orient the design to create function-driven voids for the students and academic norms, where, the landscape becomes a neutral backdrop to highlight a building. The building is like a spread of ‘fragments’ appearing to open out their arms to the surroundings. The landscape then filters into the built fabric, appearing to be stitched into the sloping earth lands. The design accounts for the extreme climatic factors by adhering to passive solar architecture with natural cooling and day lighting supported by north-south orientation and roof cover to avoid heat. 3.2.13. PLANNING The masterplan is evolved as a dense linear layout with centre dense street, suggestive of traditional shaded and interactive streets of Ahmedabad and many other medieval towns. The main institute building comprises of classroom, labs, studios and administration areas which is in northern zone. This is counter balanced on southern edge with landscaped slopped embankments of units with people functions such as design shop, design gallery and auditorium. 3.2.14. MATERIALS USED Fig 49 FRONT ELEVATION OF NID GANDHINAGAR ACADEMIC BLOCK Fig 47 GRID PATTERN OF ACADEMIC BLOCK FIG 48 ACADEMIC BLOCK IS BASED ON CLUSTER FORM , INTERCONNECTED & PHASED DEVELOPMENT.
  59. 59. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 45 R.C.C. frame structure with steel columns supporting the atrium roof. Stone grit kota chips finish is used in the outer facade of the building. Granite & marble flooring in entrance foyer and circulation space. Plain cement floor finish in classrooms & labs. 3.2.15. PARKING Parking for about 40 cars in academic zone through west gate and 13 cars parking in residential zone through south gate. Sufficient parking for 2 wheelers provided. 3.2.16. GROUND FLOOR PLAN (PHASE- I) The plan follows the profile of the site along east-west direction maintaining its character. The ground floor consists of administration, classrooms and studios, labs, faculty chambers, library and knowledge management centre. It also has a sunken table tennis court provided with steps. Planning is done around 3 atriums to allow ample light and openness to the building. Entrance has a large foyer which reflects the grandness of the building. It is also provided with ramp which leads to the upper floors for easy movement of display boards. Fig 50 FORM OF THE BUILDING
  60. 60. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 46 3.2.17. FIRST FLOOR PLAN First floor consists of all kinds of labs like digital lab, MAC lab, historic process lab, mechatronics lab and studios like LAD studio and photography studio. It also includes colour dark room and black & white dark room. It also has various other services like shooting floor and equipment store.
  61. 61. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 47
  62. 62. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 48 3.2.18. GROUND FLOOR PLAN (PHASE- II) 3.2.19. FIRST FLOOR PLAN (PHASE- II)
  63. 63. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 49 3.2.20. ACADEMIC BLOCK MAIN BLOCK (ACADEMIC & ADMINISTRATIVE) A small entrance to a grand inner space. Use of indirect lighting according to the different special needs. This act as aesthetic as well as functional element. 3.2.21. COURTYARD Two courtyards, one large and one small. The large courtyard, partially covered gives openness to the whole interior. Roof of the same plays with Iight and shadow, a wonderful design element. The daylight filtered in patterns fall all over the interior. The roof is intentionally inclined a bit so that the whole daylight can be captured. From morning to evening, Iight falls first over the knowledge centre, then to the ground. The second courtyard, rich in greenery gives the whole atmosphere a cool and open feeling. It also accounts for lighting and ventilation. 3.2.22. DISCUSSION AREA An informal discussion or meeting area provided facing the large courtyard. The partition wall given in a wavy form and seating provided in the gaps, an effective usage of space. Ceiling - Coffered Slab is utilised as design element by providing lights in the grids. Ramp provided to help in the easy transportation of heavy goods, wheel chair, trolleys, etc. to the first floor. 3.2.23. FACULTY ROOMS Faculty rooms provided around a hall. This hall also acts as a gathering/discussion space. Each faculty room has natural lighting provided. The Table Tennis court has stairs and corridor around it, so that audience can watch the game from around. All the studios and workshops have two glazed walls, one of which faces either a courtyard or the outdoor. Fig 51 ENTRANCE NOT EMPHASIZED Fig 52 OUTER ENVIRONMENT MERGED WITH INNER ENVIRONMENT Fig 53 COURTYARD
  64. 64. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 50 Structural elements converted into design features, steel beams painted in colours at different places inside the studios. 3.2.24. MATERIALS USED R.C.C. frame structure with steel columns supporting the atrium roof. Stone grit kota chips finish is used in the outer facade of the building. Granite & marble flooring in entrance foyer and circulation space. Plain cement floor finish in classrooms & labs. 3.2.25. PARKING Parking for about 40 cars in academic zone through west gate and 13 cars parking in residential zone through south gate. Sufficient parking for 2 wheelers provided. 3.2.26. FUTURE EXPANSION The possible construction on site is ceased. The vertical development of the academic building is not possible due to the structure of roof provided. Thus in case of any future expansion, horizontal expansion of the academic block is only possible. Fig 54 ROOF COVERING DOES NOT PERMIT VERTICAL EXPANSION Fig 55 OPENINGS ON THE ROOF GIVES A WONDERFUL PATTERN OF LIGHT WHICH FALLS IN COURTYARD
  65. 65. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 51 3.2.27. ARCHITECTURAL OBSERVATIONS & INFERENCES  It is essential in this project to provide functional environment but experimental architecture has opposed to create just a visual iconic landmark, things happen as you keep going and each one individually is not great but the total experience is great creating an intense feeling of release.  As a result, the student or visitor to NID experience a meandering street analogy being a character of traditional shaded interactive streets of Ahmedabad.  The building reveals as a non-monolithic form with specific scale and character assigned to the different academic, residential and public spaces to create a vibrant campus plan.  Function works with the form to deliver the convocation grounds where open stage gets aligned with buildings which provide seating during functions and isolation work as landscape elements.  The multifaceted atrium offer opportunity for interaction, landscaping and essential student activities.  The campus design is an incompatible structure for the intended function as a design school.  A design school like NID, which holds the pride of being the fore runner of design in India need structure which can rapidly evolve to the ever changing requirements. This building fails because the structure and planning is bound to too many restrictive parameters created by the concepts.
  66. 66. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 52 3.3 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DESIGN, BENGALURU 3.3.1 PROJECT BRIEF Architect: Karan Grover & Associates Client: Ministry of Commerce and Industry Site Area: 2 acres Established in: 31st March 2006 Climate: Tropical Savanna Climate 3.3.2. LOCATION National Institute of Design is an R & D campus, an extension campus of the parent institute in Ahmedabad, located in Off Tumkur Road, Bengaluru. 3.3.3. ADJOINING AREAS The NID Bengaluru campus is surrounded by Central Govt. Institutes , Central Manufacturing Technology Institute (CMTI) , Indian Plywood Industries Research & Training Institute (IPIRTI) & Indian Institute of Science (IISc) . 3.3.4. APPROACH Site has HMT road passing along its west edge, which is the only approach road. Site is accessed through an electrically operated gateway with a security cabin. The entry is located on the NW corner of the site. The road leads to the building entrance and car park. There is no separate entry for services. Site is having contours and is surrounded by dense green areas completely. Fig 56 GOOGLE EARTH IMAGE OF NID BENGALURU CAMPUS
  67. 67. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 53 3.3.5. SITE ZONING The Site consists of a Single Block which consists of OAT & Water Body. No other amenities are provided at the Site as the area is only 2 acres. The various spaces are at Building Level . 3.3.6. SITE PLAN 3.3.7. CONCEPTS The Building is in Circular Oval Shape with Central round corridor. The block consists of various wings which serve as different uses or spaces assigned. It is a Multi Level Building which raises from basement all along the circular corridor in Sloppy manner. The OAT in the center with waterbody act as a void in the building. Fig 57 SITE ZONING Fig 58 CIRCULAR CORRIDOR
  68. 68. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 54 3.3.8. GROUND FLOOR PLAN 3.3.9. FIRST FLOOR PLAN Fig 59 BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF THE CAMPUS Fig 60 NIGHT VIEW OF THE CAMPUS Fig 61 MAIN ENTRANCE
  69. 69. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 55 3.3.10. SECOND FLOOR PLAN 3.3.11. THIRD FLOOR PLAN Fig 62 NIGHT VIEW OF AMPHITHEATRE Fig 63 OAT & WATERBODY Fig 64 MAIN ENTRANCE RAMP
  70. 70. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 56 3.3.12. ARCHITECTURAL OBSERVATIONS & INFERENCES • Connectivity and communication is a key feature the ‘forum’ is a connector between the e-w blocks through n-s passages/bridges/elements. The forum holds the modules together. • Having modern dynamic form in contrast to NID Ahmadabad. • The areas around the courtyard is well planned and lighted, gives a institutional feeling but some interiors areas are dark even at the day time. • Small grass lawn are spread over the site with various landscape elements. • Classrooms at the ground have landscaped platforms outside, used by students. • Stones are used as sit outs. • Small shrubs as edges to the hard-paved pathways.
  71. 71. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 57 CHAPTER 4: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS 4.1 COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS
  72. 72. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 58 4.2. AREA PROGRAMME
  73. 73. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 59
  74. 74. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 60
  75. 75. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 61 CHAPTER 5: SITE ANALYSIS 5.1. ABOUT BHOPAL The Proposed NID site is located in Bhopal. • Bhopal is the capital of the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh and the administrative headquarters of Bhopal district and Bhopal division. • Bhopal is known as the City of Lakes. • Bhopal is home to the largest number of Institutes of National Importance in India, namely IISER, MANIT, SPA, AIIMS, NLIU and IIIT. • Area of the city : 285.00 Sq Km • Population : 14, 33,351 5.2. CLIMATIC CONDITIONS Bhopal has soaring summers and cooling winters. Climate of Bhopal is dry except during the south west monsoon season with cold winters and hot summers from March to May, temperature shoots above 40 c. nights are generally pleasant. The seasons are: 1. Hot - from March to may 2. monsoon- June from September 3. cold- from December to February 5.2.1. CLIMATIC FACTOR The climate is cumulative effect of factors such as temperature, rainfall, humidity, wind direction, and solar radiation received. Factors are analyzed with the help of available data. Factors affecting climate can be listed as: a) Intensity of Solar radiation b) Temperature c) Relative Humidity d) Total monthly rainfall e) Wind speed & Direction Fig 65 UPPER LAKE Fig 66 LOWER LAKE Fig 67 VIEW OF UPPER LAKE AND HILLY VINDHYA TERRAIN Fig 68 CLIMATIC VARIATIONS
  76. 76. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 62 5.2.2. CLIMATIC RESPONSE a. Form & Planning:  An enclosed, compactly planned & essentially inward-looking building is the most suitable.  Surfaces exposed to the direct sun should be reduced as much as possible. The larger dimension of the building should preferably face N-S (these elevations receive the lowest heat loads from solar radiation). This makes low winter sun to warm the interiors and high summer is curtailed either by projections, building element or chajjas. b. Alignment/Placement: Aligning buildings close to each other (esp. if E & W walls are placed close together); mutual shading will decrease the heat gain on External walls. c. External Spaces:  Adjacent buildings, pavements and dry ground heat up quickly, causing both a painful glare and reflected heat radiation towards the building during the day, and at night they will reradiate the heat stored during the day.  Ground surfaces should preferably be green.  Hard surfaces should be rough but not very dark.  The darker the surface & rougher it is, lower the reflectivity. Fig 69 TEMPERATURE GRAPHS Fig 70 RESPONSE OF EXTERNAL SURFACES DURING DAY TIME
  77. 77. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 63  Trees, plants and water in the enclosed space will cool the air by evaporation, help to keep dust down & provide shade, visual & psychological belief.  The presence of plant material or small pool will further enhance cooling by evaporative process.  The presence of plant material or small pool will further enhance cooling by evaporative process.  Dense trees & vegetation along the site boundary helps in controlling wind, sound & dust.  Best external space is a courtyard. One or more private courtyards coupled with terraces are provided depending upon coverage & size.  Small courts are preferred over large area to ensure shading. It acts as an excellent regulator in many ways.  Roof is mainly responsible for 50% solar heat gain.  The staggering of roofs and formation of terraces results into shading of certain portion of terraces. This adds to cooling of interior as compared to single flat roof. Fig 71 RESPONSE OF EXTERNAL SURFACES DURING NIGHT TIME FIG 72 EVAPORATIVE COOLING FIG 73 WIND CONTROL FIG 74 WIND CONTROL FIG 75 SOUND CONTROL Fig 76 DUST CONTROL
  78. 78. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 64 5.3 ABOUT SITE 5.3.1. LOCATION The site is a vacant land allotted in Special Education Zone, Acharpura village in Bhopal which is at the outskirts of Bhopal city. It is 2.6 km away from Eintkhedi village at NH 23. 5.3.2. ACCESSIBILITY The site is accessible from Raja Bhoj airport, Bhopal via Bhopal bypass road and is at a distance of 17.4 km with a drive way of 20 mins. It is 16 km away from Bhopal junction and can be approached by Bhopal road / Bhopal Guna road with a drive way of 40 mins. The nearest bus stop is Karond Square bus stop which is 9.4 km away and it takes 15 mins to reach the site. 5.3.3. CONNECTIVITY The site is located at the outskirts and it is totally undeveloped area. The site is connected to NH 23 via 8 m ROW unnamed road. The nearest shopping mall is the People’s mall at a distance of 11.6 km with a driveway of 25 mins. 5.3.4. TOPOGRAPHY OF THE SITE The altitude of the site is approximately 510 m (1673 ft.) from the mean sea level. 5.3.5. SOIL CONDITION Deep medium black soil with rocky cut crops having depth ranging between 4’ to 10’. The site is comprised of rocky hill terrain with gradual slope merging into the Acharpura village on the southern side. The highest point rises up to 518 m. Fig 79 DEEP MEDIUM BLACK SOIL Fig 77 KEY PLAN OF SITE Fig 78 GOOGLE EARTH IMAGE OF SITE
  79. 79. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 65 5.3.6. SITE AND ITS FEATURES • The site is located at the outskirts and is totally undeveloped area. • There is a defined entry to the site and boundary wall is under construction. • Boundary wall is made up of sandstone. • Sparse vegetation of tendu tree (Diospros Melonoxylon) is found at the site Madhya Pradesh is the largest producer of tendu leaves in the country about 25% of the country’s production. Fig 80 SUN PATH DIAGRAM Fig 81 SITE PLAN
  80. 80. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 66 5.3.7. SITE BYELAWS THE MADHYA PRADESH BHUMI VIKAS RULES, 1984 AGENCIES Bhopal Development Authority Madhya Pradesh Public Works Department Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board and EPCO Madhya Pradesh Town and Country Planning (MPT&CP) Capital Project Administration DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS BUILDING TYPE - Institution F.A.R. - 1.00 Maximum ground coverage - 30% Parking standard - 1 E.C.S/70 sq. m or 1.33 E.C.S/100 sq. m Setback - 9, 8, 8, 8 Maximum travel distance to the building - 22.5 m The minimum width of staircase up to 24 m in height - 1.5 Meters The minimum width of tread shall be 300 mm. Maximum height of risers shall be 150mm, limited to 15 numbers per flight. Provision of Lifts - Provision for lifts shall be made for building more than 12.5 meters in height. 5.3.8. SWOT ANALYSIS Fig 82 SWOT ANALYSIS
  81. 81. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 67 CHAPTER 6: CONCEPTUALS
  82. 82. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 68 CHAPTER 7: DESIGN SITE PLAN
  83. 83. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 69 FLOOR PLANS
  84. 84. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 70 FLOOR PLANS
  85. 85. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 71 FLOOR PLANS
  86. 86. School of Architecture, GITAM Deemed University, Vizag 72 CHAPTER 8: BIBLIOGRAPHY http://www.nid.edu National Buildings Construction Corporation Limited (A Govt. Of India Enterprise) Notice Inviting E-Tender 2015 For Appointment of Architect/ Consultant for Construction work of National Institute of Design at Bhopal, M.P. National Institute of Design Documentation 1964-69 Design as a Strategy for a Developing Economy IDC, IIT Bombay 1989 (updated 2009) India Design Report 2015 & 2016 National Design Policy The Future OF Design Education in India Importance of Design as a Factor of Competitiveness Address at the WIPO International Symposium on Design Santiago, Chile| November, 2011 Indian Architect & Builder April 2006 Idealization of The Ideal Annual Report 2015-16 National Institute of Design Admissions 2018-19 Handbook
  87. 87. Apoorva Sinha 1216514204 73

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