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INDIAN
ARCHITECTURE
Ira Yap
HINDU ARCHITECTURE
Western scholars regard Hinduism as a fusion or synthesis of various
Indian cultures and traditions. Am...
HINDU ARCHITECTURE
A Hindu temple design follows a geometrical design called vastu-
purusha-mandala. The name is a composi...
Nagara Architecture
Dravidian Architecture
Badami Chalukya Architecture
Gadag Architecture style
Kalinga architecture style
Māru-Gurjara temple architecture
PARTS
BUDDHIST ARCHITECTURE
Buddhism is a world religion, which arose in and around the ancient
Kingdom of Magadha (now in Bihar...
BUDDHIST ARCHITECTURE
Buddhist religious architecture developed in the Indian Subcontinent
in the 3rd century BCE.
Three t...
Vihara
It originally meant "a secluded place in which to walk", and referred to
"dwellings" or "refuges" used by wandering...
Stupa
a mound-like or hemispherical structure containing relics (śarīra -
typically the remains of Buddhist monks or nuns)...
Chaitya
a Buddhist shrine or prayer hall with a stupa at one end. In modern
texts on Indian architecture, the term chaitya...
ISLAMIC ARCHITECTURE
Islam first came to the western coast of India with Arab traders as
early as the 7th century AD to co...
ISLAMIC ARCHITECTURE
The most famous Islamic buildings in India emerged during the
Mughal period. Mughal architecture buil...
Slide on pics
PARTS
JAINISM
Jainism traditionally known as Jain dharma, belongs to the śramaṇa
tradition along with Buddhism and is an ancient...
JAINISM
Jain temples are built with various architectural designs.[4] Jain
temples in North India are completely different...
PARTS
SIKH ARCHITECTURE
A monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of South
Asia (subcontinental India) during...
SIKH ARCHITECTURE
Sikh Architecture, is a style of architecture that is characterized with
values of progressiveness, exqu...
Compared to Hindu temples, they are more spacious (with the
addition of adjoining divan asthan or assembly halls where nec...
HISTORY: Indian Architecture
HISTORY: Indian Architecture
HISTORY: Indian Architecture
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HISTORY: Indian Architecture

History of Architecture 3
Report by: Ira Yap
DLS-College of St. Benilde
School of Architecture
3rd Term S.Y. 2015-16
May 2016

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HISTORY: Indian Architecture

  1. 1. INDIAN ARCHITECTURE Ira Yap
  2. 2. HINDU ARCHITECTURE Western scholars regard Hinduism as a fusion or synthesis of various Indian cultures and traditions. Among its roots are the historical Vedic religion of Iron Age India itself already the product of "a composite of the Indo-Aryan and Harappan cultures and civilizations", but also the Sramana or renouncer traditions ofnortheast India, and mesolithic and neolithic cultures of India, such as the religions of the Indus Valley Civilisation, Dravidian traditions, and the local traditions and tribal religions.
  3. 3. HINDU ARCHITECTURE A Hindu temple design follows a geometrical design called vastu- purusha-mandala. The name is a composite Sanskrit word with three of the most important components of the plan. Mandala means circle, Purusha is universal essence at the core of Hindu tradition, while Vastu means the dwelling structure. The design lays out a Hindu temple in a symmetrical, self-repeating structure derived from central beliefs, myths, cardinality and mathematical principles.
  4. 4. Nagara Architecture
  5. 5. Dravidian Architecture
  6. 6. Badami Chalukya Architecture
  7. 7. Gadag Architecture style
  8. 8. Kalinga architecture style
  9. 9. Māru-Gurjara temple architecture
  10. 10. PARTS
  11. 11. BUDDHIST ARCHITECTURE Buddhism is a world religion, which arose in and around the ancient Kingdom of Magadha (now in Bihar, India), and is based on the teachings of Siddhārtha Gautama who was deemed a "Buddha" ("Awakened One"). Buddhism spread outside of Magadha starting in the Buddha's lifetime.
  12. 12. BUDDHIST ARCHITECTURE Buddhist religious architecture developed in the Indian Subcontinent in the 3rd century BCE. Three types of structures are associated with the religious architecture of early Buddhism: monasteries (viharas), places to venerate relics (stupas), and shrines or prayer halls (chaityas also called chaitya grihas), which later came to be called temples in some places.
  13. 13. Vihara It originally meant "a secluded place in which to walk", and referred to "dwellings" or "refuges" used by wandering monks during the rainy season.
  14. 14. Stupa a mound-like or hemispherical structure containing relics (śarīra - typically the remains of Buddhist monks or nuns), and used as a place of meditation.
  15. 15. Chaitya a Buddhist shrine or prayer hall with a stupa at one end. In modern texts on Indian architecture, the term chaitya-griha is often used to denote an assembly or prayer hall that houses a stupa.
  16. 16. ISLAMIC ARCHITECTURE Islam first came to the western coast of India with Arab traders as early as the 7th century AD to coastal Malabar and the Konkan- Gujarat. Cheraman Juma Masjid in Kerala is thought to be the first mosque in India, built in 629 AD by Malik lbn Dinar.
  17. 17. ISLAMIC ARCHITECTURE The most famous Islamic buildings in India emerged during the Mughal period. Mughal architecture built on the traditional Hindu architecture with influences from the Persian world. The most popular Islamic building type in India is the tomb or the mausoleum which evolved from the basic cube and hemisphere vocabulary of the early phase into a more elaborate form during the Mughal period where multiple chambers are present and tombs were set in a garden known as the char-bagh. The tomb chamber houses the cenotaph below which is the grave. Well known examples are the Gol Gumbaz, Bijapur and the Taj Mahal, Agra.
  18. 18. Slide on pics
  19. 19. PARTS
  20. 20. JAINISM Jainism traditionally known as Jain dharma, belongs to the śramaṇa tradition along with Buddhism and is an ancient Indian religion. It prescribes nonviolence (ahimsa) towards all living beings. Practitioners believe non-violence and self-control are the means to liberation. The three main principles of Jainism are non-violence (ahimsa), non-absolutism (anekantavada), and non-possessiveness (aparigraha). Followers of Jainism take 5 major vows: non-violence, not lying, not stealing (asteya), chastity, and non-attachment. Self- discipline and asceticism are thus major focuses of Jainism. Parasparopagraho Jivanam ("The function of souls is to help one another") is a motto of Jainism.
  21. 21. JAINISM Jain temples are built with various architectural designs.[4] Jain temples in North India are completely different from the Jain temples in South India, which in turn are quite different from Jain temples in West India. There are two type of Jain temples: Shikar-bandhi Jain temple(one with the dome) and Ghar Jain temple (Home Temple without dome). All shikar-bandhi Jain temples have many marble pillars which are carved beautifully with Demi god posture. There is always a main deity also known as mulnayak in each derasar. The main part of Jain temple is called "Gambhara" (Garbha Graha) in which there is the stone carved God idol. One is not supposed to enter the Gambhara without taking a bath and without wearing puja (worship) clothes.
  22. 22. PARTS
  23. 23. SIKH ARCHITECTURE A monotheistic religion that originated in the Punjab region of South Asia (subcontinental India) during the 15th century. The fundamental beliefs of Sikhism, articulated in the sacred scripture Guru Granth Sahib, include faith and meditation on the name of the one creator, unity and equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, striving for social justice for the benefit and prosperity of all, and honest conduct and livelihood while living a householder's life. The Sikhs are predominantly located in Punjab, but also in many other parts of India. It is also the fifth largest religion in the world with 25 million followers in the world as of year 2010.
  24. 24. SIKH ARCHITECTURE Sikh Architecture, is a style of architecture that is characterized with values of progressiveness, exquisite intricacy, austere beauty and logical flowing lines. Due to its progressive style, it is constantly evolving into many newly developing branches with new contemporary styles. Although Sikh architecture was initially developed within Sikhism its style has been used in many non- religious buildings due to its beauty. 300 years ago, Sikh architecture was distinguished for its many curves and straight lines; Shri Keshgarh Sahib and the Sri Harmandir Sahib (Golden Temple) are prime examples.
  25. 25. Compared to Hindu temples, they are more spacious (with the addition of adjoining divan asthan or assembly halls where necessary) and have, more often than not, entrance from all four sides, and they are not oriented to any set direction as the Muslim mosques are.

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