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Developing Citizenship:
Civics and
Government
Chapter 10
Social Studies for
Preschool/Primary Child
By Carol Seefeldt Shar...
What would children learn?
Democratic and governance principles:
• Responsibilities * Power and authority
• Rules * Roles
...
National Councils for the Social Studies
Strands(1994) Related to Civics
Strand X, Civic Ideals and Practices:
 “Social s...
Why is it important to Develop
Citizenship in Young Children?
 Civic Educations is
essential to the
preservation and
impr...
Democratic Values
 Young children learn how to
become members and build
a democratic society
 Children learn that they a...
Civic
Participation
The National Standards for Civics
and Government states that:
By the end of Grade 4, children
should h...
Civic Participation
Activities that Promote
Civic Participation
 Responsibility for self:
 Dressing, toileting and washi...
Special considerations When Teaching
Civic Participation to Young Children
Goals to move
toward:
 Knowing that rules and ...
Political Concepts
How do we teach political
concepts to young children?
 Political concepts are based on
children’s own ...
Voting
Voting is a challenging topic for young
children because of their egocentric
thinking: the concepts of winning and
...
Symbols of Democratic Government
 Children understand that
symbols stand for things
 Through the use of a variety of
sym...
Symbols of Democratic
Government:
The Pledge Allegiance
What should we do with this?
 Reserve the Pledge for special days...
Ownership and Pride
School and Community
 Children develop pride in being
members of the school
community
 Children shar...
THE END
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Developing Citizenship, Civics and Government-Chapter 10 Social Studies for Preschool/Primary Child presented by Arianny Savinon, Lehman College, 2013, NYC

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Developing Citizenship, Civics and Government-Chapter 10 Social Studies for Preschool/Primary Child presented by Arianny Savinon, Lehman College, 2013, NYC

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Developing Citizenship, Civics and Government-Chapter 10 Social Studies for Preschool/Primary Child presented by Arianny Savinon, Lehman College, 2013, NYC

  1. 1. Developing Citizenship: Civics and Government Chapter 10 Social Studies for Preschool/Primary Child By Carol Seefeldt Sharon Castle & Renee C. Falconer Presented by Arianny Savinon EDS 739 Lehman College Summer 2013
  2. 2. What would children learn? Democratic and governance principles: • Responsibilities * Power and authority • Rules * Roles • Laws * Individuals and groups • Participation * Values • Fairness • Democracy • Rights
  3. 3. National Councils for the Social Studies Strands(1994) Related to Civics Strand X, Civic Ideals and Practices:  “Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic”  K-4 Strand:  Children should know about democratic principles, government, the Constitution, world affairs, and citizenship  Children will acquire intellectual skills such as critical thinking within a democracy and participatory skills  Children should be exposed to questions and social issues related to:  Civic participation  Citizenship and role in the community, nation and world  Rights and responsibilities Activities: Helping set the classroom expectations, conducting service projects, participating in class meetings, making decisions to  NCSS Strand VI, Power, Authority and Governance:  “ Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create and change structures of power, authority and governance”  Children should be exposed to questions and issues related to:  What is power, how is earned, used and justified, who hold it, what forms does it take?  What is government, how is created, structured, changed and maintained?  How we keep government responsive to citizens’ needs and interests?  How can individual rights be protected?  Activities:  Children learn about fairness, rights, responsibility, rules and order through their relationship with others in specific contexts  They develop notion of power and authority as they
  4. 4. Why is it important to Develop Citizenship in Young Children?  Civic Educations is essential to the preservation and improvement of a democratic society  Young children learn from informal and formal experiences that start in the classroom  Children learn democratic values : foundation for
  5. 5. Democratic Values  Young children learn how to become members and build a democratic society  Children learn that they are valued, worthy and respected  Children learn their rights  Learn to give up their egocentrism  Learn to share and to balance their individual  Strategies to Manage a Democratic Group  Teachers share control  Children make decisions  Discipline is firm and consistently, but does not involve around force, coercion, embarrassment or threat  Freedom of thought and speech are fostered  Children are NEVER overwhelmed by the power of others  A sense of community is built  Teachers model respect for others  Teachers promote caring behaviors What do Young Children Learn?
  6. 6. Civic Participation The National Standards for Civics and Government states that: By the end of Grade 4, children should have develop the following participation skills: • Influencing decisions by working with others • Clearly articulating interests and making them known to decision makers • Building coalitions, negotiating, compromising, and seeking consensus • Managing conflicts • Young children start developing participation when they assume responsibility for themselves
  7. 7. Civic Participation Activities that Promote Civic Participation  Responsibility for self:  Dressing, toileting and washing  Responsibility for others and the group:  Group discussion, activities, stories, songs…  Setting tables, serving food, cleaning up after play and work, caring for plants and animals that belong to the group  Sharing responsibilities and ideas in a group activity  Class meetings are effective to model and practice democratic values: clarifying rules, resolving interpersonal conflicts, and collecting problem solving  Setting rules in the classroom and following them: using Children learn to participate and become productive members of a society when:  They serve others  Help in their homes: taking care of siblings, pets, parents Research: “Active participation in service learning in social studies classrooms improves learning and attitudes toward civic involvement…” Helpful experiences: Teachers assign children responsibilities for taking care of others in the classroom Teachers organized trips to places in the community where children can serve others ( e. g. nursing homes, picking up trash, recycling, distribute books, food/toys for needy children, designing posters to protect animals, plants, environment, etc. ) Engaging question: How could you make a difference? This model service-oriented thinking
  8. 8. Special considerations When Teaching Civic Participation to Young Children Goals to move toward:  Knowing that rules and laws are established by people  Realizing that rules and laws are always changing  Understanding that people have control over their own lives  Being empathetic, socially responsible, and considerate for others Goals to move away from:  Perceiving rules as coming from “on high”  Thinking of rules as unchanging  Perceiving people as powerless before the law  Being egocentric, self- centered, and indifferent to others
  9. 9. Political Concepts How do we teach political concepts to young children?  Political concepts are based on children’s own experiences and should be introduced informally  Use their knowledge about the President, Flag, Pledge Allegiance, songs to introduce political topics  Children understand authority through their experiences at home and in school – Connections- Research about Children’s Political learning:  “Children become politically aware and talk about politic topics even when their range of knowledge is narrow…”  Children acquire information from different sources and experiences including home, school and media  “Young children involvement in politics begins early with strong emotional attachment to the President….”  Concepts of politics begin in early childhood, and the process of development is continual  Basic attachments and identifications are among the first concepts acquired  Children view political authority figures as positive, benevolent, and personal  Feelings and affection develop before knowledge  Not until early childhood can children distinguish
  10. 10. Voting Voting is a challenging topic for young children because of their egocentric thinking: the concepts of winning and losing are difficult to accept Strategies to Help Young Children Learn the Concept of Voting: 1. Ask children to make choices and explain the reasons for their choices 2. Let children experience the consequences of their choices 3. Graph children’s choices so they can talk about them 4. Give children two choices( in the group, decide to make a cake, then ask children to choose between 2 flavors, then graph their choices and analyze with them the outcomes) Children can vote to make decision about: Rules to cleanup time, games, taking turns for specific tasks, who will lead the group for the day, what service project they prefer to do, and so on.
  11. 11. Symbols of Democratic Government  Children understand that symbols stand for things  Through the use of a variety of symbols children begin to understand abstract political concepts in concrete terms: pictures, visuals, songs, stories, movements  The Flag • The flag serves as a visual symbol • Young children seem to recognize the importance of flags • Experiences with flags can help Activities that help children develop a concept of the flag: • Design flags in the classroom • Post various flags around the classroom • Have children construct a booklet about the flags • Read stories about Betsy Ross and the history of the flag • Start research projects about the American flag • Research project about other flags • Sing song or read stories about flags • Organize a flag display day
  12. 12. Symbols of Democratic Government: The Pledge Allegiance What should we do with this?  Reserve the Pledge for special days  Invite members of special organizations to demonstrate their flags ceremony and recite the Pledge of Allegiance The Pledge allegiance was created to celebrate the 400th anniversary of America’s discovery. Teachers need to be careful about requiring young children to recite it and to salute the flag. Flag salutation violates the religious belief of some groups of believers No one may be compelled to salute the flag For young children recite the pledge allegiance is meaningless. Since it’ s done without thought, it does not foster democratic values or attitudes Reciting the pledge became an act of doctrination instead of an act of learning
  13. 13. Ownership and Pride School and Community  Children develop pride in being members of the school community  Children share in caring for the school, cleaning, decorating, participating in events, appreciating the job of people within their community and school  Children take neighborhood field trips and explore their community  They learn how people are interdependent and develop awareness of the place their Nation  Teacher can provide young children with experiences that help them comprehend the sizes, magnificence and diversity of the nation  Using maps, identify, culture, features, habits, customs, and practices of people from different parts of the nation, comparing places within their community and nation and around the world
  14. 14. THE END

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