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Brain Health Bulletin 11.pdf

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Brain Health Bulletin
V O L U M E 1 1
From Dementia Care Specialists ADRC Southwest Wisconsin Nov 30, 2022
Disclaimer
Reference in this Brain Health Bulletin to any
specific commercial products, processes, or
services, or the use...
Source: https://share.upmc.com/2014/12/get-know-brain-series-frontal-lobe/
Frontal Lobe Info
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Please enjoy Brain Health Bulletin #10! Please feel free to forward this to anyone who may find benefit in receiving it! The Brain Health Bulletin is designed to be your quick reference to the latest information about brain health, dementia research, technology, cultural awareness for effective, inclusive, and compassionate dementia treatment, care partner tools, and more!
Be sure to check out our new podcast called The Resilient Caregiver at The Resilient Caregiver: Empowering Those Who Serve People Diagnosed with Dementia • A podcast on Anchor

Please enjoy Brain Health Bulletin #10! Please feel free to forward this to anyone who may find benefit in receiving it! The Brain Health Bulletin is designed to be your quick reference to the latest information about brain health, dementia research, technology, cultural awareness for effective, inclusive, and compassionate dementia treatment, care partner tools, and more!
Be sure to check out our new podcast called The Resilient Caregiver at The Resilient Caregiver: Empowering Those Who Serve People Diagnosed with Dementia • A podcast on Anchor

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Brain Health Bulletin 11.pdf

  1. 1. Brain Health Bulletin V O L U M E 1 1 From Dementia Care Specialists ADRC Southwest Wisconsin Nov 30, 2022
  2. 2. Disclaimer Reference in this Brain Health Bulletin to any specific commercial products, processes, or services, or the use of any trade, firm, or corporation name is for the information and convenience of the public, and does not constitute endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the ADRC, or its officers, employees or agents.
  3. 3. Source: https://share.upmc.com/2014/12/get-know-brain-series-frontal-lobe/ Frontal Lobe Info
  4. 4. Source: https://share.upmc.com/2014/12/get-know-brain-series-frontal-lobe/ Frontal Lobe Info The frontal lobe, located in the front part of the brain, is the largest of the four main lobes and is considered our emotional control center and home to our personality and decision-making abilities. The frontal lobes also are linked to sensory and memory centers throughout the brain and allow us to determine how to use information that is stored elsewhere. To put it simply, it allows us to think things through and rationalize decision making. Problem Solving You feel good knowing that $20 can buy you 10 $2 candy bars. Thank your frontal lobe for knowing simple math. Activity in this lobe allows us to solve problems, reason, make judgments, make plans and choices, take action, and generally control your living environment. Without the frontal lobe, you could be considered a genius, however; you would be unable to use any of that intelligence. Movement The frontal lobe controls your voluntary muscles, or the muscles you use to ride a bike, jog, throw a baseball, or make other conscious movements. Other parts of your brain control involuntary movement and muscle coordination. Also, the ability to determine the position of your body in a natural environment, or spatial orientation, is also a function of the frontal lobe. Social Interaction The frontal lobe gives us the ability to communicate and interact appropriately in any given situation. This area of the brain also allows us to understand the thinking and experience of others, which helps you determine how to respond or behave when placed in a social situation. For example, was that joke you’re friend told funny? Maybe not and you gave a fake laugh just to make them feel better. You guessed it, frontal lobe at work. Can you live without your frontal lobe? Technically, you can live without a frontal lobe. However, you would experience a total paralysis of your cognitive abilities and motor control. In short, you wouldn’t be able to reason and form simple thoughts, and you also wouldn’t be able to move.
  5. 5. Source: https://www.viridian-nutrition.com/blog/brain- health/keeping-your-brain-healthy
  6. 6. Technology "As the population across the globe continues to dramatically increase, the prevalence of cognitive impairment and dementia will inevitably increase as well, placing increasing burden on families and health care systems. Technological advancements over the past decade provide potential benefit in not only relieving caregiver burden of caring for a loved one with dementia, but also enables individuals with dementia to age in place. Technological devices have served to improve functioning, tracking and mobility. Similarly, smartphones, tablets and the ubiquitous world wide web have facilitated the dissemination of health information to previously hard to reach populations largely through use of various social media platforms." Thank you for subscribing to this bulletin as one of these offerings designed to reach far and wide! Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8040150/
  7. 7. Sense Garden The progressive impact of dementia on memory, communication, behaviour, orientation, and mood can have serious implications for an individual’s wellbeing. Whilst there is currently no cure for dementia, it has been suggested that activity involvement can improve the quality of life for individuals living with the disease. Activities such as sensory stimulation and reminiscence therapy have been shown to have positive effects on mood, memory, and self-identity. People with dementia will visit the SENSE-GARDEN room, accompanied by a caregiver, professional or family member. The SENSE-GARDEN will adapt itself to the life experiences of its visitor by connecting to a digital Life Book with her or his history and memories. The person’s favourite music fills the room; photos of familiar places are displayed, like the church next to the house where she or he lived when younger, or showing people such as family members and friends. The project includes four countries in which the SENSE-GARDEN is tested: Norway, Belgium, Romania and Portugal. Source: http://www.aal-europe.eu/projects/sensegarden/
  8. 8. Research Updates "The Brain's Immune Cells Can Be Triggered to Slow Down Alzheimer's Disease." "New Target for Alzheimer's Therapies Found: Medin has been known for over 20 years, but its influence on diseases was previously underestimated. We were able to show that pathological changes in the blood vessels of Alzheimer's patients are significantly enhanced by medin," says Dr. Jonas Neher from the Tübingen site of DZNE, who led the study.'" "Down syndrome, like Alzheimer's, is a double-prion disorder, study shows. Discovery may point to new therapeutic approach for common neurodegenerative disorders." "Gossypetin found in hibiscus may beat Alzheimer's disease. A research team has verified that gossypetin activates immune cells in the brain that clear A beta, which triggers Alzheimer's disease." "Machine learning gives nuanced view of Alzheimer's stages. Researchers used machine learning to pinpoint the most accurate means, and timelines, for anticipating the advancement of Alzheimer's disease in people who are either cognitively normal or experiencing mild cognitive impairment." Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/news/mind_brain/dementia/
  9. 9. "New Alzheimer’s Drug Shows Positive Results but Side Effects Eisai Co. and Biogen Inc.’s drug, called lecanemab, slowed cognitive decline by 27% compared with a placebo over 18 months in a study of more than 1,700 people with early-stage Alzheimer’s, researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine on Tuesday. The drug’s effect was moderate, and was associated with swelling and bleeding in the brain, the researchers said. They recommended further, longer study of the drug. Some 17.3% of patients taking lecanemab had signs of brain bleeding, compared with 9% in the placebo group. Brain swelling occurred in 12.6% of people getting the drug, versus 1.7% who got placebos." Source: https://www.wsj.com/articles/new-alzheimers-drug-shows-positive-results-but- side-effects-11669766449 Research Updates
  10. 10. C U L T U R A L L Y R E S P O N S I V E R E S O U R C E S A new USC study shows that older African Americans who received culturally tailored text messages about Alzheimer’s disease had the highest increase in Alzheimer’s disease literacy levels when compared with other participants. Researchers say the study, published in the American Journal for Geriatric Psychiatry, shows culturally competent educational formats are an important way to reduce health disparities. Enter the BrainWorks study by Karen Lincoln, an associate professor at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work and founder of Advocates for African American Elders at the USC Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging. The study tested an intervention that began with participants attending an hourlong “talk show” in an African-American community setting that delivered information about Alzheimer’s. The next phase incorporated a monthlong regimen of daily text messages to promote Alzheimer’s literacy — defined as knowledge about the disease and understanding of its causes, consequences, symptoms and treatment. “Alzheimer’s education is important for everyone,” Lincoln said. “However, increasing Alzheimer’s literacy among African-Americans is crucial for increasing their awareness of their personal risk for the disease, improving care, reducing disparities and ultimately enhancing the quality of life of people diagnosed and their caregivers.” Source: Alzheimer's in African Americans: Risks and inequities (medicalnewstoday.com)
  11. 11. Check out The Resilient Caregiver Podcast! Make sure to subscribe to catch all of our interviews with amazing experts who can empower you be resilient during your journey of caregiving! Learn more at https://anchor.fm/theresilientcaregiver
  12. 12. Make sure to Like and Follow the Dementia Care Specialist Page on Facebook @adrcswwi.dementia! If you have any friends or clients who would benefit from getting information about how to be a resilient caregiver, please recommend this page to them!
  13. 13. Questions? Want a brain wellness check? Reach out today at (800) 514-0066 bbeam@gchsd.org bbiddick@gchsd.org
  14. 14. Disclaimer Reference in this Brain Health Bulletin to any specific commercial products, processes, or services, or the use of any trade, firm, or corporation name is for the information and convenience of the public, and does not constitute endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the ADRC, or its officers, employees or agents.

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