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NATIONAL INSECT WEEK
20TH - 26TH JUNE 2016
A COLLECTION OF CATHOLIC ENTOMOLOGISTS
FROM THE CATHOLIC LABORATORY (FOLLOW US ...
AGOSTINO BASSI
(1773-1856)
Preceded Louis Pasteur in the
discovery the microorganisms can
be the cause of disease.
Discove...
PIERRE ANDRÉ LATREILLE
(1762-1833)
Trained as a Catholic priest, but
imprisoned during the French
Revolution. Regained his...
JEAN HENRI FABRE
(1823-1915)
A popular teacher of physics, chemistry and
biology, but best known for his work in
entomolog...
HENRI MOUHOT
(1826-1861)
Travelled through Europe studying
photography, and then devoting himself
to the study of natural ...
JOHN DZIERZON
(1811-1906)
Pioneering apiarist who discovered the
phenomenon of parthenogenesis in
bees and designed the fi...
ERIC WASMANN
(1859-1931)
Jesuit priest who specialised in ants and
termites.
He described the phenomenon known as
‘Wasmann...
THOMAS BORGMEIER
(1892-1975)
Franciscan priest whose interest in entomology
grew from studying ants, discovering phorid
fl...
KARL KEHRLE
(1898-1996)
Also known as ‘Brother Adam’, a
Benedictine monk, beekeeper and
developer of the ‘Buckfast bee’.
E...
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National Insect Week 2016

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A short presentation on the contribution of the Catholic Church to the topic of entomology during this year's National Insect Week

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National Insect Week 2016

  1. 1. NATIONAL INSECT WEEK 20TH - 26TH JUNE 2016 A COLLECTION OF CATHOLIC ENTOMOLOGISTS FROM THE CATHOLIC LABORATORY (FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER @CATHOLICLAB)
  2. 2. AGOSTINO BASSI (1773-1856) Preceded Louis Pasteur in the discovery the microorganisms can be the cause of disease. Discovered muscardine disease of silkworms was caused by a parasitic organism, named Bavaria bassiana in his honour. In 1953 the Italian post office issued a stamp on the 180th anniversary of his birth. He is known as the ‘Father of insect pathology’
  3. 3. PIERRE ANDRÉ LATREILLE (1762-1833) Trained as a Catholic priest, but imprisoned during the French Revolution. Regained his freedom when he discovered a rare beetle species, Necrobia ruficollis, in the prison. Worked on arthropod systematics and taxonomy, gaining his many accolades including a volume on arthropods in Cuvier’s ‘The animal kingdom’. Many books were dedicated to him, and up to 163 species are named in his honour. Described by one of his pupils as ‘the prince of entomologists”.
  4. 4. JEAN HENRI FABRE (1823-1915) A popular teacher of physics, chemistry and biology, but best known for his work in entomology. Known as the “Father of modern entomology”. He influenced later writings of Charles Darwin, who called Fabre an ‘inimitable observer’. Fabre remained sceptical of Darwin’s theory of evolution because he always held back from all theories and systems. He wrote many books on insects in a biographical form, combining his passion for scientific truth and a colloquial style. In 1956, the French post office issued a stamp in his honour.
  5. 5. HENRI MOUHOT (1826-1861) Travelled through Europe studying photography, and then devoting himself to the study of natural sciences, specialising in ornithology and conchyliology. He traveled to Bankock and made 4 journeys to SIam, Cambodia and Loas. He popularised Ankor Wat in the West, which led to interest in studying and preserving the site. He collected many specimens of insects, and discovered a new species later named Mouhotia gloriosa in his honour.
  6. 6. JOHN DZIERZON (1811-1906) Pioneering apiarist who discovered the phenomenon of parthenogenesis in bees and designed the first successful moveable-frame beehive. Discovered the mechanism of secretion of royal jelly and its role on the development queen bees. Ordained a Catholic priest, but was excommunicated owing to disagreements on papal infallibility. He was later reconciled to the Church. Published over 800 articles on bees. Known as the “Founder of Modern Bee Keeping”.
  7. 7. ERIC WASMANN (1859-1931) Jesuit priest who specialised in ants and termites. He described the phenomenon known as ‘Wasmannian mimicry’, where the mimic resembles it's host (the model) in order to live within the same nest or structure. Supported evolution, but challenged natural selection, the evolution of humans from other animals, and universal common descent. He wrote over 700 papers, identified over 900 new species of ant, and received many honours for his contributions to entomology. Known affectionately as the “ant father”.
  8. 8. THOMAS BORGMEIER (1892-1975) Franciscan priest whose interest in entomology grew from studying ants, discovering phorid flies attacking and parasitising them. Became adjunct research scientist in the National Museum of Rio de Janeiro, later moving on to become head of the entomological section of the Institito de Biologia Vegetal in the Botanical Gardens. Founded the international journal Revisita de Entomologia, and commenced a series of monographs that became Studia Entomologica. Published over 240 papers in entomology and related subjects. Described more than 1,000 species of phorid flies and 100 species of ants, and a number of myrmecophilous beetles.
  9. 9. KARL KEHRLE (1898-1996) Also known as ‘Brother Adam’, a Benedictine monk, beekeeper and developer of the ‘Buckfast bee’. Established a bee mating station on Dartmoor, allowing desired selective crossings. Undertook research travels across Europe and Africa for species to incorporate into the Buckfast stock. Became International Bee Research Association (IBRA) vice-president, and is awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List

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