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Low-Intensity Strategies:
Using Instructional Feedback
to Support Instruction
Low-Intensity Strategies for
Academics and Behavior
Opportunities to Respond
Behavior Specific Praise
Active Supervision
I...
Agenda
• What is instructional feedback?
• Why is instructional feedback effective?
• What does the supporting research fo...
Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered Model of Prevention
Goal: Reduce Harm
Specialized individual systems
for students ...
Comprehensive, Integrative,
Three-tiered (CI3T)
Models of Support
Assess, Design, Implement, and
Evaluate
Basic Classroom ...
CI3T Primary Plan
Academics
Behavior
Social
What is instructional feedback?
• Teaching strategy to:
– Clarify misinformation
– Confirm understandings
– Fine-tune unde...
What is instructional feedback?
• Used when students
– have base of understanding
– working toward proficiency and fluency...
The Learning Process
Cues
Participation
Feedback
and/or
Reinforcement
(Heward, 1994; Lysakowski & Walberg, 1982;
Miller & ...
Purpose
• To close the gap between expected and
current performance in academics,
behavior, and social skills (Hattie, 200...
Feedback Model
Where am I going?
What are the
goals?
How am I going?
What progress is
being made
toward the goals?
Where d...
Examples
How am I going?
“Jorge, you are using the 4-step process we learned to accurately
complete the problem.”
Where do...
Why is Instructional Feedback
Effective?
• Serves as a motivator and reinforcer
• Provides instructional information
– Cue...
Why is Instructional Feedback
Effective?
• Feedback should be related to
– effort and actions that are malleable, not base...
What does the supporting research for
instructional feedback say?
• Increased on-task behavior for students with EBD in th...
See “Instructional Feedback Resource
Guide” for additional supporting research
and information.
Supporting Research
What are the benefits and challenges?
Benefits
• Large group
• Targeted small group
• Minimal time
• Creates safe learning...
Provide clear directions and checks for
understanding
Opportunities for practice and feedback are
planned
Step 2
Step 3
St...
How do I implement instructional feedback in my classroom?
Checklist for Success
Implement active supervision and provide
...
How do I increase Instructional
Feedback in my classroom?
Implementation checklist for success
• Step 1: Identify learning...
How well is it working?
Examining the Effects
How well
did this
support
work for
this
student?
Experimental
Design
What do...
Instructional Feedback
Student Outcomes
Baseline A1 Feedback B2Withdrawal A2Feedback B1
Panel B. Paola’s Academic Engageme...
Ensuring the Strategy is in Place:
Treatment Integrity
Have structures in place to monitor whether
instructional feedback ...
What does the student think about it?
See “Instructional Feedback Social
Validity Student”
Completed by the
student(s) par...
What does the teacher think about it?
See “Social Validity Adapted-
IRP15 Adult”
Completed by the
teacher(s) and
parent(s)...
Sample Elementary Intervention Grid
Support Description School-wide Data:
Entry Criteria
Data to Monitor
Progress
Exit Cri...
Sample Middle/High School
Intervention Grid
Support Description School-wide Data:
Entry Criteria
Data to Monitor
Progress
...
CI3T Ticket Examples
Plan:
Implementation Checklist for Success
Instructional Feedback
Will you please…
Determine when you will use instruction...
Lane, K. L., Menzies, H. M., Ennis,
R. P., & Oakes, W. P. (2015).
Supporting behavior for school
success: A step-by-step g...
Questions
kathleen.lane@ku.edu
Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating Comprehensive,
Integrated, Three-Tiered (CI3T) Models of Prevention: Step
by Step ...
Lane, K. L., Menzies, H. M., Bruhn, A.L., & Crnobori, M. (2011).
Managing Challenging Behaviors in Schools: Research-
Base...
Prochain SlideShare
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Instructional Feedback

USD 497 Ci3T

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Instructional Feedback

  1. 1. Low-Intensity Strategies: Using Instructional Feedback to Support Instruction
  2. 2. Low-Intensity Strategies for Academics and Behavior Opportunities to Respond Behavior Specific Praise Active Supervision Instructional Feedback High p Requests Precorrection Incorporating Choice Self-Monitoring Behavior Contracts
  3. 3. Agenda • What is instructional feedback? • Why is instructional feedback effective? • What does the supporting research for instructional feedback say? • What are the benefits and challenges? • How do I implement instructional feedback in my classroom? Checklist for Success • How well is it working? Examining the Effects
  4. 4. Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered Model of Prevention Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized individual systems for students with high-risk Academic Behavioral Social PBIS Framework Validated Curricula ≈80% ≈15% ≈5% Goal: Prevent Harm School/classroom-wide systems for all students, staff, & settings Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized group systems for students at-risk Primary Prevention (Tier 1) Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009)
  5. 5. Comprehensive, Integrative, Three-tiered (CI3T) Models of Support Assess, Design, Implement, and Evaluate Basic Classroom Management Effective Instruction Low Intensity Strategies Behavior Contracts Self-Monitoring - - Functional Assessment-Based Interventions Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support Low Intensity Strategies Higher Intensity Strategies Assessment
  6. 6. CI3T Primary Plan Academics Behavior Social
  7. 7. What is instructional feedback? • Teaching strategy to: – Clarify misinformation – Confirm understandings – Fine-tune understandings – Restructure current schemas • Produces learning by delivering content related information and reinforcement that positively affects motivation effort engagement (Butler & Winne, 1995; Kulhavy & Wagner, 1993)
  8. 8. What is instructional feedback? • Used when students – have base of understanding – working toward proficiency and fluency • Two-fold Function – Teachers gain students’ perception of instructions • adjust instructional planning – Students benefit from positive specific feedback • increase intrinsic motivation (Deci & Ryan, 2000) • increase persistence on future difficult tasks (Kamins & Dweck, 1999)
  9. 9. The Learning Process Cues Participation Feedback and/or Reinforcement (Heward, 1994; Lysakowski & Walberg, 1982; Miller & Dollard, 1941)
  10. 10. Purpose • To close the gap between expected and current performance in academics, behavior, and social skills (Hattie, 2009) • The learner must have an opportunity to engage in an action in response to the feedback (Gable, Hester, Rock, & Hughes, 2009)
  11. 11. Feedback Model Where am I going? What are the goals? How am I going? What progress is being made toward the goals? Where do I go next? What activities need to be undertaken to make better progress? Hattie and Timperley (2007) • Effective instructional feedback provides information on the learning process and content acquisition instead of the correct response
  12. 12. Examples How am I going? “Jorge, you are using the 4-step process we learned to accurately complete the problem.” Where do I go next? “Celia, please write the acronym for the 4-step process next to the problem and cross off each step as you complete it. That will help you keep the order of the steps.” – Error Correction “Celia, using the mnemonic helped you apply the process to solve the problem accurately.” Provide feedback on malleable characteristics such as effort. “You included all of the elements of the essay; you did a good job using the rubric to write your paper”
  13. 13. Why is Instructional Feedback Effective? • Serves as a motivator and reinforcer • Provides instructional information – Cues students to focus on key processes, information, and concepts (Butler & Winne, 1995) – Specific and offers support to correct content and misunderstandings (Harks et al., 2014) • Positive, proactive approach for correcting learning errors • Increases motivation (Kamins & Dweck, 1999) • Supports intrinsic motivation
  14. 14. Why is Instructional Feedback Effective? • Feedback should be related to – effort and actions that are malleable, not based upon ability – a criterion or the individual’s previous performance • Negative effects occur when students are compared to peers (Harks et al., 2014) – Critical feedback creates doubt, lowers self- confidence, and lowers motivation to attempt difficult tasks – Particularly true for students with EBD and LD (Alber, Heward, & Hippler, 1999)
  15. 15. What does the supporting research for instructional feedback say? • Increased on-task behavior for students with EBD in the general education classroom (Allday et al., 2012) • Improve students’ math outcomes with use of strategy feedback (process) and outcome feedback (accuracy of response) working memory mediated the outcomes (Fyfe, DeCaro, & Rittle-Johnson, 2015) • Instructional feedback related to schoolwide expectations resulted in reductions in behavioral incidents over two years (Simonsen, Britton, & Young, 2010)
  16. 16. See “Instructional Feedback Resource Guide” for additional supporting research and information. Supporting Research
  17. 17. What are the benefits and challenges? Benefits • Large group • Targeted small group • Minimal time • Creates safe learning environment • Supports students in demonstrating expected behaviors • Improves academic outcomes • Increases engagement Challenges • Determining the best type of feedback • Carefully selecting words to use – Students may perceive feedback as critical if care is not taken • Measuring the effectiveness of feedback
  18. 18. Provide clear directions and checks for understanding Opportunities for practice and feedback are planned Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 1 Identify learning goals Provide instruction to meet established goals How do I implement instructional feedback in my classroom? Checklist for Success
  19. 19. How do I implement instructional feedback in my classroom? Checklist for Success Implement active supervision and provide instructional feedback Provide time and direction for students to review work or have additional opportunities to practice Evaluate instructional practices Offer students an opportunity to give feedback on how instructional feedback is being offered Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 Step 5
  20. 20. How do I increase Instructional Feedback in my classroom? Implementation checklist for success • Step 1: Identify learning goals. • Step 2: Provide instruction to meet established goals. • Step 3: Provide clear directions and checks for understanding. • Step 4: Opportunities for practice and feedback are planned. • Step 5: Implement active supervision and provide instructional feedback. • Step 6: Provide time and direction for students to review work or have additional opportunities to practice. • Step 7: Evaluate instructional practices. • Step 8: Offer students an opportunity to give feedback on how instructional feedback is being offered. See “Instructional Feedback Implementation Checklist for Success”
  21. 21. How well is it working? Examining the Effects How well did this support work for this student? Experimental Design What do stakeholders think about the goals, procedures, and outcomes? Social Validity Is it happening? Treatment Integrity
  22. 22. Instructional Feedback Student Outcomes Baseline A1 Feedback B2Withdrawal A2Feedback B1 Panel B. Paola’s Academic Engagement and Spanish Assignment Accuracy Figure 5.1 Examining the effects: Students’ academic engagement and assignment accuracy: Percentage during Spanish class. Hypothetical Illustration (Lane, Menzies, Ennis, & Oakes, 2015)
  23. 23. Ensuring the Strategy is in Place: Treatment Integrity Have structures in place to monitor whether instructional feedback is carried out as intended. Treatment integrity checklist items: 1. I identified and shared learning goals. 2. I provided instruction to meet the established goals. 3. I provided clear directions and checked for understanding. 4. Students had opportunities to practice. 5. I used active supervision and provided instructional feedback. 6. I provided time, direction for students to review work or have additional opportunities to practice. 7. I evaluated instruction based on student response. See “Instructional Feedback Treatment Integrity Checklist”
  24. 24. What does the student think about it? See “Instructional Feedback Social Validity Student” Completed by the student(s) participating in the intervention at two time points: Pre and Post Intervention
  25. 25. What does the teacher think about it? See “Social Validity Adapted- IRP15 Adult” Completed by the teacher(s) and parent(s) involved in the intervention at two time points: Pre and Post Intervention
  26. 26. Sample Elementary Intervention Grid Support Description School-wide Data: Entry Criteria Data to Monitor Progress Exit Criteria Instructional Feedback Instructional feedback refers to detailed, specific information for students from a teacher or peer to confirm, fine- tune, clarify, and restructure current schemas. Verbal, written, or technology based specific feedback on processes and progress. One of more of the following: Behavior:  SRSS-E7: Moderate (4-8)  SRSS-I5: Moderate (2-3)  SRSS-E7: High (9-21)  SRSS-I5: High (4-15)  Ranking of 1, 2, or 3 on the Motivation to Learn subscale of the SSiS-PSG  Two or more office discipline referrals (ODRs) within a grading period ___ AND ___ OR Academic:  Three or more assignments scoring 79% or below within a grading period  AIMSweb: intensive or strategic level (math or reading)  Progress report: Targeted for Growth for academic learning behaviors Student performance targeted for improvement (e.g., homework grades, quiz grades, test grades, % of work completed, academic engaged time % of intervals). Treatment integrity  Implementation checklist  Treatment integrity checklist Social validity  IRP-15 (teacher)  Student- completed survey  Zero missing assignments in a grading period  All assignments scoring 80% or higher in a grading period and  SRSS-E7: Low (0-3)  SRSS-I5: Low (0-1) or  Ranking of 4 or 5 on the Motivation to Learn subscale of SSiS-PSG (Lane, Menzies, Ennis, & Oakes, 2015)
  27. 27. Sample Middle/High School Intervention Grid Support Description School-wide Data: Entry Criteria Data to Monitor Progress Exit Criteria Instructional Feedback Instructional feedback refers to detailed, specific information for students from a teacher or peer to confirm, fine- tune, clarify, and restructure current schemas. Verbal, written, or technology based specific feedback on processes and progress. One of more of the following: Behavior:  SRSS-E7: Moderate (4-8)  SRSS-I7: Moderate (cut scores coming soon)  SRSS-E7: High (9-21)  SRSS-I7: High (cut scores coming soon)  Ranking of 1, 2, or 3 on the Motivation to Learn subscale of the SSiS-PSG  Two or more office discipline referrals within a grading period ___ AND ___ OR Academic:  Two or more missing assignments in any class  Three or more assignments in any class at C or below  Progress report: Targeted for Growth for academic learning behaviors Student performance targeted for improvement (e.g., homework grades, quiz grades, test grades, % of work completed, academic engaged time % of intervals). Treatment integrity  Implementation checklist  Treatment integrity checklist Social validity  IRP-15 (teacher)  Student- completed survey  Zero missing assignments in target class(es) for a grading period  2.5 GPA or higher in a grading period and  SRSS-E7: Low (0-3)  SRSS-I5: Low (0-1) or  Ranking of 4 or 5 on the Motivation to Learn subscale of SSiS-PSG (Lane, Menzies, Ennis, & Oakes, 2015)
  28. 28. CI3T Ticket Examples
  29. 29. Plan: Implementation Checklist for Success Instructional Feedback Will you please… Determine when you will use instructional feedback. Make a list of instructional feedback statements you can use: • In your classroom during various instructional activities. • In other key areas in your building (use school expectation matrix).
  30. 30. Lane, K. L., Menzies, H. M., Ennis, R. P., & Oakes, W. P. (2015). Supporting behavior for school success: A step-by-step guide to key strategies. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Related Resource
  31. 31. Questions kathleen.lane@ku.edu
  32. 32. Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered (CI3T) Models of Prevention: Step by Step Guide (2014). A special issue of Preventing School Failure, volume 58, issue 3 www.tandfonline.com/toc/vpsf20/58/3 Lane, K. L., Menzies, H. M, Oakes, W. P., & Kalberg, J. R. (2012). Systematic screenings of behavior to support instruction: From preschool to high school. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Resources
  33. 33. Lane, K. L., Menzies, H. M., Bruhn, A.L., & Crnobori, M. (2011). Managing Challenging Behaviors in Schools: Research- Based Strategies That Work. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Lane, K. L., Kalberg, J. R. & Menzies, H. M. (2009). Developing Schoolwide Programs to Prevent and Manage Problem Behaviors: A Step-by-Step Approach. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Lane, K.L., Menzies, H.M., Ennis, R.P., & Oakes, W. P. (2015). Supporting Behavior for School Success: A Step-by-Step Guide to Key Strategies. New York, NY: Guilford. Recommended Resources

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