Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.
Literate Environment Analysis By: Caylin Davis
Getting to Know Literacy Learners, P-3 <ul><li>This research-based practice helped me create a literate environment becaus...
Selecting Texts <ul><li>This research-based practice helped me to create a literate environment because I found a variety ...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective <ul><li>This research-based practice helped me create a literate environment by h...
Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><li>This research-based practice helped me to create a literate en...
Prochain SlideShare
Chargement dans…5
×

Literate Environment Analysis

620 vues

Publié le

Publié dans : Formation
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Literate Environment Analysis

  1. 1. Literate Environment Analysis By: Caylin Davis
  2. 2. Getting to Know Literacy Learners, P-3 <ul><li>This research-based practice helped me create a literate environment because I really got to know and understand my students. We teach students, and if we have their interests at heart we must get to know them better by finding out about the whole child (Laureate Education, 2010). The better I know my students, the better I can connect them with texts that will impact them. I gave two assessments to my students to get to know my students, the first one was the Elementary Reading Attitude Survey. This survey gave a quick indication of a student’s attitudes toward reading. Leigh-Ann Hildreth mentions in the video, Getting to Know Your Students (2010) that she wants to know her students well and quickly. One strategy that I adapted from Leigh-Ann Hildreth, is her strategy of “Me Stew.” Students bring in a couple items that can fit in a paper bag. These items describe the student. This strategy helped me determine what exactly interests and motives individual students. It is important to know our students and what interests them so they are motivated to learn. </li></ul>Reference Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010). Getting to know your Students. [DVD] The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: Author.
  3. 3. Selecting Texts <ul><li>This research-based practice helped me to create a literate environment because I found a variety of texts, ranged from linguistic to semiotic and from narrative informational, which allowed me to meet the diverse needs of my students and interests. This allowed kids to choose books that interest them which I found to motivate students to read. I am surrounded by texts and to help me analyze and select texts for my lessons, I used something called the literacy matrix that Dr. Hartman introduced in the video, Analyzing and Selecting Text. This matrix supported me and helped me meet my students needs and interests and utilize what they bring to the classroom (Laureate Education, 2010). This matrix tool helped me organize and choose texts carefully to support my students in literacy so they can be successful. </li></ul>Reference Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010). Analyzing and selecting text. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PK-3. Baltimore: Author
  4. 4. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective <ul><li>This research-based practice helped me create a literate environment by helping students become strategic processors (Laureate Education, 2010). I supported my students by providing my students with strategies to understand and comprehend a variety of texts by teaching my students how to attack texts that are unfamiliar to them. One strategy that I taught my students, to be successful strategic processors, is the reciprocal questioning strategy. This strategy is used, when students and the teacher ask questions and talk about each big idea while reading the chapters. I implemented this, and had students take notes about the big idea and students completed graphic organizers to understand and comprehend the big ideas of the text (Tompkins, 2010, p. 408). </li></ul>References Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010a). Interactive perspective: strategic processing. [DVD]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: Author. Tompkins, G.E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
  5. 5. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><li>This research-based practice helped me to create a literate environment because it gave students the opportunity to be creative and respond to text in a variety of ways. Having knowing the kids before hand, this allowed me to see the kids personality and self come out as they respond and think critically about texts using different strategies that work best for them. Dr. Almasi mentions that the critical perspective is teaching children how to critically examine text and to look at the text from different perspectives (Laureate Education, 2010). Dr. Almasi continues to mention that the response persprective is to allow children the opportunity to experience and respond to texts in a creative way (Laureate Education, 2010). Students use their prior experience as they are engaged with the text, having that emotional reaction can sometimes be sad, happy, upset, etc. (Laureate Education, 2010). Students experienced this emotional reaction as they responded to a variety of texts in a multiple ways because it is up to them to choose how they want to respond, which makes it very personable to them, causing emotions. </li></ul>Reference Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010). Perspectives on literacy learning. [Webcast.] The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: Author.

×