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Pr_Thuan.pptx

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Pr_Thuan.pptx

  1. 1. Sustainable agriculture - Solution to world hunger - Environmental protection
  2. 2. Current status: world hunger 2050 now Need more food
  3. 3. No more land available for expansion
  4. 4. Insect: solution to world hunger Everywhere  wide habitat Cold-blooded  require less energy to stay warm Life cycle: ~ 30 – 90 days Less care than livestock
  5. 5. Insect: solution to world hunger
  6. 6. Environmental protection: virtuous eco-cycle Feeding: organic materials Waste
  7. 7. Reducing Greenhouse effect Decrease 20% methane emission

Notes de l'éditeur


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    Crop Nutrition - The world's population continues to grow, which means that agricultural production needs to increase by 70% by 2050.
    However without land available for expansion, 90% of that supply will have to come from land already used
  • Ref: https://www.fao.org/sustainability/news/detail/en/c/1274219/
  • Imagine this: Insects feeding on organic materials from other processes, such as spent grains from brewery operations, thus preventing additional waste from going into landfills, and providing added value to the brewery and feed for the insects
  • Ahmed, E., Fukuma, N., Hanada, M., & Nishida, T. (2021). Insects as Novel Ruminant Feed and a Potential Mitigation Strategy for Methane Emissions. Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 11(9), 2648. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11092648

    Compared to cattle, weight for weight, insects emitted 80 times less methane — a gas with 25 times more impact on global temperature levels than carbon dioxide.
    And crickets produced 8–12 times less ammonia than pigs.

    According to the study’s lead author, Dennis Oonincx, an entomologist from Wageningen University in the Netherlands, 80 per cent of the world’s population eats insects, particularly in the developing world.

    The results demonstrate that insects produce much smaller quantities of greenhouse gases than conventional livestock such as cattle and pigs

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