Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

Politics Fall 2019

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 15 Publicité

Politics Fall 2019

Télécharger pour lire hors ligne

This powerpoint was made in the fall of 2019. It describes the basic setup of the US government (the branches set up in the constitution). It touches on how a president can be impeached and how the (then current) impeachment of Trump was progressing.

This powerpoint was made in the fall of 2019. It describes the basic setup of the US government (the branches set up in the constitution). It touches on how a president can be impeached and how the (then current) impeachment of Trump was progressing.

Publicité
Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (20)

Publicité

Plus récents (20)

Publicité

Politics Fall 2019

  1. 1. US GOVERNMENT
  2. 2. Power US GOVERNMENT Constitution
  3. 3. US GOVERNMENT Constitution Legislative Executive Judicial
  4. 4. US GOVERNMENT Legislative Executive Judicial Makes Laws Carries Out Laws Interprets Laws
  5. 5. US GOVERNMENT Legislative Executive Judicial Congress Senate House of Representatives President Supreme Court
  6. 6. IMPEACHMENT: HOW? Congress Senate House of Representatives Can Impeach President
  7. 7. IMPEACHMENT: HOW? Congress Senate House of Representatives Can Impeach President They do an investigation and vote
  8. 8. IMPEACHMENT: HOW? Congress Senate House of Representatives Can Impeach President Vote on: Impeachment valid? Guilty or Not?
  9. 9. HISTORY •Only two Presidents have ever been impeached: •Andrew Johnson 1868 •Bill Clinton 1998 •Neither were convicted
  10. 10. CURRENTLY: Trump’s contact with Ukraine over former Vice President Joe Biden.
  11. 11. PREVIOUSLY: Trump’s obstruction of justice, collusion with Russia in 2016, acceptance of money from foreign countries.
  12. 12. CURRENTLY: Voted: Investigation is valid House of Representatives
  13. 13. CURRENTLY: Waiting for the House They will vote on validity Senate
  14. 14. SOURCES • https://www.usa.gov/branches-of-government • https://history.house.gov/Institution/Origins-Development/Impeachment/

Notes de l'éditeur

  • Separation of Powers
  • Separation of Powers
  • Congress has the authority to declare war
    President has the power to veto it
    President can declare a national emergency
  • Congress has the authority to declare war
    President has the power to veto it
    President can declare a national emergency
  • The House brings impeachment charges against federal officials as part of its oversight and investigatory responsibilities
    The Senate holds a trial

    Impeachment at the federal level is limited to those who may have committed "Treason, Bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors

    Congress has the power to impeach a president
    United States impeachment is only the first of two stages, and conviction during the second stage requires "the concurrence of two thirds of the members present”
    Impeachment does not necessarily result in removal from office; it is only a legal statement of charges
    Second legislative vote which determines conviction, or failure to convict, on the charges embodied by the impeachment

    Conviction in the Senate requires a two-thirds supermajority vote of those present

    Conviction immediately removes the defendant from office. Following conviction, the Senate may vote to further punish the individual by barring him or her from holding future federal office, elected or appointed. Conviction does not extend to further punishment, for example, loss of pension. After conviction by the Senate, "the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law" in the regular federal or state courts.
  • The House brings impeachment charges against federal officials as part of its oversight and investigatory responsibilities
    The Senate holds a trial

    Impeachment at the federal level is limited to those who may have committed "Treason, Bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors

    Congress has the power to impeach a president
    United States impeachment is only the first of two stages, and conviction during the second stage requires "the concurrence of two thirds of the members present”
    Impeachment does not necessarily result in removal from office; it is only a legal statement of charges
    Second legislative vote which determines conviction, or failure to convict, on the charges embodied by the impeachment

    Conviction in the Senate requires a two-thirds supermajority vote of those present

    Conviction immediately removes the defendant from office. Following conviction, the Senate may vote to further punish the individual by barring him or her from holding future federal office, elected or appointed. Conviction does not extend to further punishment, for example, loss of pension. After conviction by the Senate, "the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law" in the regular federal or state courts.
  • The House brings impeachment charges against federal officials as part of its oversight and investigatory responsibilities
    The Senate holds a trial

    Impeachment at the federal level is limited to those who may have committed "Treason, Bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors

    Congress has the power to impeach a president
    United States impeachment is only the first of two stages, and conviction during the second stage requires "the concurrence of two thirds of the members present”
    Impeachment does not necessarily result in removal from office; it is only a legal statement of charges
    Second legislative vote which determines conviction, or failure to convict, on the charges embodied by the impeachment

    Conviction in the Senate requires a two-thirds supermajority vote of those present

    Conviction immediately removes the defendant from office. Following conviction, the Senate may vote to further punish the individual by barring him or her from holding future federal office, elected or appointed. Conviction does not extend to further punishment, for example, loss of pension. After conviction by the Senate, "the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law" in the regular federal or state courts.
  • 15 federal judges impeached by the House, two Presidents (Andrew Johnson in 1868 and William Jefferson (Bill) Clinton in 1998), a cabinet secretary (William Belknap in 1876), and a U.S. Senator (William Blount of North Carolina in 1797) have also been impeached. 
  • 15 federal judges impeached by the House, two Presidents (Andrew Johnson in 1868 and William Jefferson (Bill) Clinton in 1998), a cabinet secretary (William Belknap in 1876), and a U.S. Senator (William Blount of North Carolina in 1797) have also been impeached. 
  • 15 federal judges impeached by the House, two Presidents (Andrew Johnson in 1868 and William Jefferson (Bill) Clinton in 1998), a cabinet secretary (William Belknap in 1876), and a U.S. Senator (William Blount of North Carolina in 1797) have also been impeached. 
  • 15 federal judges impeached by the House, two Presidents (Andrew Johnson in 1868 and William Jefferson (Bill) Clinton in 1998), a cabinet secretary (William Belknap in 1876), and a U.S. Senator (William Blount of North Carolina in 1797) have also been impeached. 
  • 15 federal judges impeached by the House, two Presidents (Andrew Johnson in 1868 and William Jefferson (Bill) Clinton in 1998), a cabinet secretary (William Belknap in 1876), and a U.S. Senator (William Blount of North Carolina in 1797) have also been impeached. 

×