Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

Creative Nonfiction Module 1.pdf

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Creative Nonfiction
Quarter 3 – Module 1:
Analyzing the Themes and
Techniques Used in a Text
12
Creative Nonfiction – Grade 12
Self-Learning Module (SLM)
Quarter 3 – Module 1: Analyzing the Themes and Techniques Used i...
12
Creative
Nonfiction
Quarter 3 – Module 1:
Analyzing Themes and
Techniques Used in a Text
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Prochain SlideShare
Creative Nonfiction Module 3
Creative Nonfiction Module 3
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 28 Publicité
Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Similaire à Creative Nonfiction Module 1.pdf (20)

Plus récents (20)

Publicité

Creative Nonfiction Module 1.pdf

  1. 1. Creative Nonfiction Quarter 3 – Module 1: Analyzing the Themes and Techniques Used in a Text 12
  2. 2. Creative Nonfiction – Grade 12 Self-Learning Module (SLM) Quarter 3 – Module 1: Analyzing the Themes and Techniques Used in a Text First Edition, 2020 Republic Act 8293, section 176 states that: No copyright shall subsist in any work of the Government of the Philippines. However, prior approval of the government agency or office wherein the work is created shall be necessary for exploitation of such work for profit. Such agency or office may, among other things, impose as a condition the payment of royalties. Borrowed materials (i.e., songs, stories, poems, pictures, photos, brand names, trademarks, etc.) included in this module are owned by their respective copyright holders. Every effort has been exerted to locate and seek permission to use these materials from their respective copyright owners. The publisher and authors do not represent nor claim ownership over them. Printed in the Philippines by Department of Education – SOCCSKSARGEN Region Office Address: Regional Center, Brgy. Carpenter Hill, City of Koronadal Telefax: (083) 2288825/ (083) 2281893 E-mail Address: region12@deped.gov.ph Development Team of the Module Writer: Esther D. Vinson Editors: Louie Mark G. Garvida , Imelda C. Martinez, Jerryl Jean L. Salunayan Reviewers: Helen J. Ranan, Sally A. Palomo Illustrator: Reginard C. Fajanoy Layout Artist: Esther D. Vinson Cover Art Designer: Ian Caesar E. Frondoza Management Team: Francis Cesar B. Bringas, CESO IV – Regional Director Fiel Y. Almendra, CESO V – Assistant Regional Director Romelito G. Flores, CESO V - Schools Division Superintendent Carlos G. Susarno, Ph.D – Assist. Schools Division Superintendent Gilbert B. Barrera – Chief, CLMD Arturo D. Tingson Jr. – REPS, LRMS Peter Van C. Ang-ug – REPS, ADM Gerardo Magno – Subject Area Supervisor Juliet F. Lastimosa - CID Chief Sally A. Palomo - Division EPS In- Charge of LRMS Gregorio O. Ruales - Division ADM Coordinator Ronnie R. Sunggay / Helen J. Ranan – Subject Area Supervisor / Coordinator
  3. 3. 12 Creative Nonfiction Quarter 3 – Module 1: Analyzing Themes and Techniques Used in a Text
  4. 4. 4 Introductory Message For the facilitator: Welcome to the Creative Nonfiction- Grade 12 Self-Learning Module (SLM) on Analyzing Themes and Techniques Used in a Text! This module was collaboratively designed, developed and reviewed by educators both from public and private institutions to assist you, the teacher or facilitator in helping the learners meet the standards set by the K to 12 Curriculum while overcoming their personal, social, and economic constraints in schooling. This learning resource hopes to engage the learners into guided and independent learning activities at their own pace and time. Furthermore, this also aims to help learners acquire the needed 21st century skills while taking into consideration their needs and circumstances. In addition to the material in the main text, you will also see this box in the body of the module: As a facilitator you are expected to orient the learners on how to use this module. You also need to keep track of the learners' progress while allowing them to manage their own learning. Furthermore, you are expected to encourage and assist the learners as they do the tasks included in the module. Notes to the Teacher The lessons presented here may not be complete but you can add inputs to your students should they need your guidance.
  5. 5. 5 For the learner: Welcome to the Creative Nonfiction- Grade 12 Self-Learning Module (SLM) on Analyzing Themes and Techniques Used in a Text! The hand is one of the most symbolized part of the human body. It is often used to depict skill, action and purpose. Through our hands we may learn, create and accomplish. Hence, the hand in this learning resource signifies that you as a learner is capable and empowered to successfully achieve the relevant competencies and skills at your own pace and time. Your academic success lies in your own hands! This module was designed to provide you with fun and meaningful opportunities for guided and independent learning at your own pace and time. You will be enabled to process the contents of the learning resource while being an active learner. This module has the following parts and corresponding icons: What I Need to Know This will give you an idea of the skills or competencies you are expected to learn in the module. What I Know This part includes an activity that aims to check what you already know about the lesson to take. If you get all the answers correct (100%), you may decide to skip this module. What’s In This is a brief drill or review to help you link the current lesson with the previous one. What’s New In this portion, the new lesson will be introduced to you in various ways such as a story, a song, a poem, a problem opener, an activity or a situation. What is It This section provides a brief discussion of the lesson. This aims to help you discover and understand new concepts and skills. What’s More This comprises activities for independent practice to solidify your understanding and skills of the topic. You may check the answers to the exercises using the Answer Key at the end of the module. What I Have Learned This includes questions or blank sentence/paragraph to be filled in to process what you learned from the lesson. What I Can Do This section provides an activity which will help you transfer your new knowledge or skill into real life situations or concerns.
  6. 6. 6 Assessment This is a task which aims to evaluate your level of mastery in achieving the learning competency. Additional Activities In this portion, another activity will be given to you to enrich your knowledge or skill of the lesson learned. This also tends retention of learned concepts. Answer Key This contains answers to all activities in the module. At the end of this module you will also find: The following are some reminders in using this module: 1. Use the module with care. Do not put unnecessary mark/s on any part of the module. Use a separate sheet of paper in answering the exercises. 2. Don’t forget to answer What I Know before moving on to the other activities included in the module. 3. Read the instruction carefully before doing each task. 4. Observe honesty and integrity in doing the tasks and checking your answers. 5. Finish the task at hand before proceeding to the next. 6. Return this module to your teacher/facilitator once you are through with it. If you encounter any difficulty in answering the tasks in this module, do not hesitate to consult your teacher or facilitator. Always bear in mind that you are not alone. We hope that through this material, you will experience meaningful learning and gain deep understanding of the relevant competencies. You can do it! References This is a list of all sources used in developing this module.
  7. 7. 7 What I Need to Know This module was designed and written with you in mind. It is here to help you master how to analyze themes and techniques used in a text. The scope of this module permits it to be used in many different learning situations. The language used recognizes the diverse vocabulary level of students. The lessons are arranged to follow the standard sequence of the course. But the order in which you read them can be changed to correspond with the textbook you are now using. After going through this module, you are expected to: 1. contrast creative writing to creative nonfiction; and 2. identify the themes and techniques used in the texts. Most Essential Learning Competency • Analyze the theme and techniques used in a particular text.
  8. 8. 8 What I Know Choose the letter of the best answer. Write the chosen letter on a separate sheet of paper. 1. What is the hybrid of nonfiction and literary components which are done in essay and story forms with setting, characterization, concepts, and facts? a. creative nonfiction b. creative writing c. science fiction d. literary genre 2. What genre is purely based on imagination or inspired from the stories or ideas of other people and aims to entertain and share human experiences? a. science fiction b. drama c. fiction d. diary 3. What is known as the literary element that expresses the general idea or the message of the text in complete sentence? a. theme b. motif c. claim d. tone 4. What technique in creative nonfiction exaggerates or alters the objective realities for the purpose of enhancing and clarifying the meaning in the context of fiction? a. figures of speech b. creative license c. symbolism d. dialogue 5. What is known as the use of objects or images to represent ideas? a. symbolism b. imagery c. theme d. motif 6. What is the technique where characters speak to one another and is used to substitute for exposition? a. creative license b. exposition c. dialogue d. irony
  9. 9. 9 7. What irony is the opposite of what the characters’ expectation and what actually happens? a. situational irony b. dramatic irony c. verbal irony d. disparity 8. “It seems that your upper lip is growing numb, fat and thick, as if swollen with liquid.” What kind of imagery is dominant in this statement? a. gustatory imagery b. auditory imagery c. tactile imagery d. visual imagery 9. Which of the following does NOT symbolize the color “red”? a. romance b. danger c. peace d. war 10.“The river jumps over the mountain.” What is the technique used in this sentence? a. figure of speech b. creative license c. symbolism d. irony 11.“ABS-CBN was said to be unbeatable.” What kind of irony is this? a. expectation versus reality b. situational irony c. dramatic irony d. verbal irony 12.“The psychiatrist’s son died because of suicide.” What technique is used in this statement? a. exposition b. imagery c. theme d. irony 13.Which of the following is expressed in correct form of a theme? a. Love does not judge one’s past. b. Opposites attract. c. Dare to care d. God is love.
  10. 10. 10 14.“I already told this to you million times, yet you do not change!” What figure of speech is this statement? a. personification b. hyperbole c. metaphor d. simile 15.Which of the following is NOT an example of creative nonfiction? a. interview story b. memoir c. novels d. diary
  11. 11. 11 Lesson 1 Analyzing Themes and Techniques Used in a Text Hello! Congratulations for doing a great job in your First Semester subjects. You are here again to another subject that will boost your potential in writing and can hone your skill in expressing your ideas and speaking up your mind through composing essays and stories. All people have different roads they are taking, varied choices, destinies, and decisions that build their character. In other words, they all have different stories to tell and write and writing creative nonfiction is not that hard since the experiences are already embodied in your existence. Further, you have learned in your Creative Writing subject that theme is the general idea or the message of the text expressed in complete sentence and is applicable in fiction and non-fiction. On the other hand, literary techniques are used by the authors on how they construct their language to convey the message. These techniques occur within a single word, phrase, or group of words at a single point in a text however, there are techniques in fiction which are not applicable in nonfiction. These are the things you will be learning in this module. So, before you will write nonfiction, you will analyze first how the writers tailor their texts through the techniques and themes they incorporate. What’s In Before learning this first module, try to recall the concepts in Creative Writing, the pre-requisite subject to Creative Nonfiction. Activity 1. Walk Down the Memory Lane. Read the statements below and identify what is being described in each item. The choices are inside the wooden label. Write your answer on a separate sheet of paper. Situational Irony Dramatic Irony Verbal Irony Symbolism Diction Motif Literary Techniques Figure of Speech Literary Genre Foreshadowing Theme Image
  12. 12. 12 1. It means the presentation of details, characters, or incidents in a narrative way wherein the events are prepared for or “shadowed forth". 2. Sometimes recurring throughout the text, it is described as a concrete representation of a sense impression, a feeling, or an idea. 3. It is a category of literary composition and being determined by literary techniques, tone, content, or length of the text. 4. These are linguistic techniques that produce special effect such as figure of speech, narrative style, or plot. 5. It is also known as figurative language that creates pictures in the mind of the readers or listeners. 6. Commonly, it refers to an object, a setting, or an action representing the character or situation. 7. This type of irony contrasts to what the character thinks and what the readers think is true. 8. It is one type of irony in literature wherein what is said contrasts with what is meant. 9. It is the assertion, argument, or the main idea of a literary work. 10.This refers to the selection of words in a literary work. Notes to the Teacher As your students’ helping hand, your role as a teacher is really needed to guide them with the use of this material. They may have queries that this material cannot answer, it is expected that you can enlighten them and hopefully motivate them to write creatively.
  13. 13. 13 What’s New Creative Nonfiction Defined As a genre of writing, creative nonfiction uses literary styles and techniques to create factual and accurate narratives of events and individuals. It is also called literary nonfiction or narrative nonfiction. Creative nonfiction is different with other nonfiction just like technical writing or journalism which is purely based on accurate fact or precise reality. It is a hybrid of nonfiction components and literary features which are done in essay form and story form with setting, rhetorical patterns, characterization, concepts, facts (not just beauty of words), and researched truths. In this genre, the patterns of development in writing are done in narration, explanation, and exposition where the author is personally engaged to the experiences conveyed in the text. Furthermore, the ultimate goal of creative nonfiction is for the author to communicate well-researched details similar to a reporter but being tailored like that of a fiction. It possesses both accuracy and style. There are three broad categories under creative nonfiction: biographical narratives (e.g. full length biography, literary biography, historical biography, profile, character sketch, and interview story); autobiographical narratives (e.g. full-length autobiography, multi-volume autobiography, memoir, diary, and journal); and personal and informal essay (e.g. literary reportage, descriptive essay, and reflective essay.) Other types of creative nonfiction are travel writing, food writing, and nature writing while there are emerging forms such as testimonio, blog, and Facebook status report. On the other hand, creative writing talks about human experiences like love, dreams, hopes, loss, and other things that in reality happened to humanity. It is purely based on imagination or inspired from the stories or ideas of other people. In other words, it aims to entertain and share human experiences. Examples of creative writing are poetry, plays, songs, movie and television scripts, speeches, novels, and short stories. Activity 2. Between the Lines. From the above information, contrast creative writing and creative nonfiction. Write your answers on a separate sheet of paper using the pants diagram. Creative Writing Creative Nonfiction
  14. 14. 14 What is It There are techniques used in creative nonfiction that can also be used also in fiction. However, the techniques listed below are features mainly used for creative nonfiction. Literary techniques are definite and intentional use of words that the authors use to convey the message of the text. These usually occur within a word or phrase, or phrases, at one single point in a text. However, literary techniques are not really required to be always in the text unlike the literary elements. 1. Creative license. It is a technique in creative nonfiction wherein the author exaggerates or alters the objective realities for the purpose of enhancing and clarifying the meaning in the context of fiction. It is the author’s freedom to go away with the conventions or rules in writing. For example, the phrase “you and I” is used instead of “you and me” in order to create and effect. Another is applying small distortions as a way of handling factual materials. 2. Figures of Speech. These techniques are also related to figurative language wherein the intended meaning is different from the actual meaning of the words. Examples are simile, hyperbole, personification, onomatopoeia, oxymoron, and lot more. 3. Symbolism. The use of objects or images to represent ideas not only in fiction but also in nonfiction is called symbolism. A symbol is something that is tangible and visible and the idea that it symbolizes is abstract although the meaning sometimes may vary. For example in the statement “I was born when the locusts came,” the word locust signifies problem as it is associated with pests. The word “rock” may signify strength; “couch” implies for comfort; and “dove” symbolizes peace. 4. Exposition. It is in this part that the author interrupts the story to explain something or to give important background information. Look at the excerpt from a memoir entitled “A Virtuous Woman” below. Notice that the second paragraph provides additional knowledge about the writer’s mother. And it happened. When I received the news that she refused to eat and take medicines, I said, “this is it.” as I was sitting at her bedside, the night before she left, I was holding her hand. I kept caressing those calloused hands, the hands that nurtured me when I was young, the hands that comforted me when I was hurt, and the hands that molded me to what I am now. As I was sitting that night I cannot help but recall memories of my sweet mother. She was very meek, a very submissive wife. She never answered back nor reasoned out to my father. I admired her (and pitied her) for that. She surrendered even her faith, and followed my father’s religion. We are very thankful for her doing that, I still cling to that faith. It is one thing that I owe to my father. -Sally Ardaniel Palomo
  15. 15. 15 - You Do Not Want It, You Need It By: Shania Winona Tracey E. Canda 5. Dialogue. It is a technique where characters speak to one another and is used to substitute for exposition. It is through dialogue that many of the characters thoughts and actions are being revealed. Notice the exchange of dialogue in the text below between the writer and her Mom in the essay below. “But Mom,” I protested after she showed me another pair of pants. “That is very uncomfortable. This one makes me more comfortable. This is what I need.” “Nonsense,” my mother snapped back. “Don’t you think it is much appropriate for young girls like you to wear such popular brand of clothes?” That statement always bounces back to me whenever my family and I go shopping not only for my clothes but also for food, school supplies, shoes, and even the tiniest of things like hair clips. 6. Imagery. This refers to the language that describes in detail appealing to the senses like visual imagery and sound imagery. The images are those that can be seen, touched, heard, smelled, and tasted. For example, the phrases “she had extreme difficulty of breathing” and “cursing in a loud voice” create an auditory imagery because of the word “breathing” and “cursing” that appeal to the hearing. Another example is “he shortened his grip on the arm…” makes a tactile imagery because of the word “grip” that the reader can imagine the act of holding or touching the arm. 7. Irony. There are three types of irony: verbal, dramatic, and situational. Verbal irony is about the disparity between the words of the characters and what they meant; situational irony is the opposite of what the characters or readers’ expectation and what actually happens; while the dramatic irony is the contrast of what the character knows and what the reader knows. The statement “The cop was caught parking on a wrong side” is an example of situational irony. Moreover, theme is another element needed in analyzing the text. It means the central idea, the thesis, or the overall message that the text is communicating to the readers. It should be expressed also in complete sentence and should not be mistaken as the topic. It should be the topic plus the idea about the topic. Below are the examples of themes. “Problems come to make people become strong and mature.” “Making decisions in life is not an easy thing to do.” “Love makes people smile behind the struggles.” “Failures are part of making one successful.”
  16. 16. 16 What’s More As a student of public school, what struggles have you faced and conquered before? What motivated you to study and keep going? In the text that you are about to read, you will discover that indeed, whatever hindrances in life, if there is the will to succeed, a person will surely rise above his or her circumstances. The Man Who Dares to Fail He has a lot of qualities not to excel, but like a small stone thrown into the water that creates ripples, he dared to fail and made a difference. As a son of illiterate parents, who came from the poorest of the poor families, he suffered a hand-to-mouth struggle in order to survive. His father had not gone to school, while his mother had only reached Grade III. None of his elder sister and brother graduated in elementary. He, the youngest of the three children, barely finished Grade V when his right eardrum was perforated and infected, because of muro-ami-like fishing. He and his friends used to swim deep into the seabed to hammer layers of rocks, so fishes would move out for them to hit with their self-made arrow. Financially and educationally incapacitated, he was left in the healing ritual of the albularyo and became hearing impaired. Walking and crossing a river to go to school with cooked corn grains and bulad (dried fish), ginamos/bagoong (salted fish) or salt, wrapped in banana leaf as baon was bearable, but being bullied due to his handicap drained his self-esteem. He had to quit schooling. “I remember during my elementary, I used to climb a Mabolo tree in school and (food) took my lunch there, because I was ashamed to let my schoolmates see my baon, but it was the bullying of my schoolmates of my defect that hurt me more” he said. He helped his landless parents in the farm or worked as a child laborer in sugarcane plantations to augment their family income. But then, he realized later that the only way to haul his family from the quagmire of poverty was through education. At the age of 15, he went back to school as working student, matured and tough enough to endure the bullying that went with his hearing impairment. This time he vowed to himself that no amount of bullying and poverty could bar him from succeeding. He was not an elementary graduate when he enrolled in high school, but he consistently ranked first of his class since his first year and graduated valedictorian at Surallah National Agricultural School in South Cotabato. He gained and maintained his academic scholarship with his highly satisfactory grades and finished his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration – Accounting and Bachelor of Science in Education - History as cum laude at Mindanao State of University-General Santos City. He was also a consistent academic excellence, journalism and college leadership awardee.
  17. 17. 17 Not resting from his laurels, he obtained his Master of Arts in Education – Educational Management at Notre Dame of Marbel University, Koronadal City in 1997 and his Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management in MSU-General Santos City in 2018. “My student life was a constant struggle. When the degree of the intensity of my hearing is too low, I resorted to lip-reading. I had to borrow notebooks from my classmates or spend almost sleepless nights to reading books during my high school and college, and researching online during my PhD,” he recalled. In 2006, he won the Metrobank Foundation Outstanding Teacher of the Philippines award, the first awardee from SoCSarGen (South Cotabato-Sarangani- General Santos). He was also the first recipient of the joint Metrobank Foundation and Japan Foundation Secondary School Educators Group Tour award to Japan for half month on the same year. As school paper adviser, he accumulated medals as the Best School Paper Adviser of the Philippines for eight times (NSPC 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, and 2008). In 2004, he was awarded as the Most Outstanding School Paper Adviser of the Philippines at the National Schools Press Conference - Sta. Cruz, Laguna. Last June 1, 2019, Asia-Pacific Global Citation and Center for the Promotion of Campus Journalism bestowed on him the Gawad Dyornalismo Lifetime Achievement Award in Campus Journalism in Tagaytay City. An author of campus journalism books, an award-winning short film actor and stage play writer/director, division, regional, and national trainer and resource person on campus journalism and theatre arts, these are but a few of the achievements that this very loving husband and supportive father of four children has accumulated. Needless to say, he has proven to the whole world that there is life beyond handicap and wallowing in the quagmire of poverty is but a lame excuse not to succeed in life. This man whom I admire so much, started from the rock-bottom and sky- rocketed to the peak of success. I am so immensely lucky and proud that he is my best friend, my teacher, my idol and my father, DR. GELLY ELEGIO ALKUINO. -Marlo Gel P. Alkuino Activity 3. The Taste of Words After reading the above text, try analyzing the themes and techniques in the text using the creative nonfiction analysis framework. Write your answer on a separate sheet of paper.
  18. 18. 18 Creative Nonfiction Analysis Framework A. Themes Guide Questions Answers 1. What are the underlying themes in the text? 2. Can you quote lines from the text to support your answer? B. Techniques 1. Does the author show creative license in the text? Support your answer if it is evident. Creative license Figure of speech 2. What figures of speech are being used by the writer? Cite them. Symbolism 3. Does the text use symbols to represent something? If there is, briefly explain your answer. Exposition 4. Is there an exposition part in the text? If yes, support your answer. Dialogue 5. Does the character/s have the throwing of dialogues? Provide an example. Imagery 6. Are there images in the text? What kinds of imagery are they? Irony 7. Is there a statement of irony from the text? If yes, support your answer.
  19. 19. 19 The techniques in analyzing creative nonfiction are… What I Have Learned In your own words, how do you describe the functions of the techniques and themes in analyzing creative non-fiction? The themes in analyzing creative nonfiction are… What I Can Do Do you have plants at home? What are the kinds of plants do you have or your family members collect? Try to go outside your house and name the plants around because this next text is about the different foliage. Activity 4. Planting Hope. Read the text below and identify the theme and techniques used in the text using the creative writing analysis framework. ‘Plantdemic’ Chronicles “Why will I buy plants this pandemic time? They’re not basic needs! They cannot be eaten.” These were the words I reciprocated to Jane who was so obsessed of looking for plants with her Aunt Sol. They even went to the market as early as 4:00 a.m. just to catch up with the cheaper plants.
  20. 20. 20 “You see, you have eaten your words, Ading.” Jane added who used to call me Ading. She graduated two degrees in doctoral but look at her, she loves to collect plants. “When I retire, these plants will be my leisure,” she added. Those were her words as she told me, gardening is the thing for the oldies. I wondered her notion about gardening that it is for the oldies because even I was young, all of my family members loved to garden, sweeping the ground, planting ornamentals, watering the plants, grooming them after waking up in the morning to find out that nobody was cooking at the kitchen to prepare for the meals. But these pandemic times, everybody becomes the plantita and plantito. These are coined terms from the words plant and tita or tito referring to the men and women in all ages and even the celebrities became such. Some of the very popular of these celebrities presenting their expensive plant collections in the social media are Jinky Pacquiao, Aubrey Miles, and Gretchen Fulido. These people love to post their plants or collections in their Instagram, Facebook, and other social media platforms. They actually call their new collection as “babies” referring to the different floras and foliage they newly bought, planted, and collected. Even Ethel Booba had a spoof of her pricey indoor plant collection from other countries which are eggplant and banana in a pot and placed inside the house. There are other plants which were sensationalized just like the Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant) or commonly known as makahiya that I thought only as a grass in the fields but is being sold in the gardens. It is called sensitive plant because when one touches it, the leaves fold. But be careful, you will be pricked because of its thorns. It is like shy person that can retaliate when being hurt or touched. Another is the Queen of the Night (Epiphyllum oxypetalum), a special kind of orchid cactus with white flower resembling water lily and grows from leaf cuttings. It is very expensive flower in other countries like India, and Sri Lanka because this nocturnal plant shows its petals late at night for two hours only. Not only that, it blooms only once every three to five years and the petals’ extract can be used as perfume. Sometimes it is called “wishing flower” as people say, you can wish if the petals are open. There was even a belief that fairies are attracted because of its fragrance. Sometime in 2012, I was able to take picture of its petals. It was beauty in the dark, majestic yet exclusive and the scent was so strong and irresistible. I even went back inside the house right away after taking a picture thinking that there were bad spirits around. That was almost 12 midnight when I witnessed it. “Here’s your soil, Ate.” Mike, my cousin called me from inside the house because I started planting during the Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) time. I have already different collections before the pandemic because every festival at the oval plaza, I always buy plants for my collections. Other plants came from my parents which they bought from Makilala, North Cotabato wherein there are both vast and small gardens just along the National Highway. In other words, I was already plantita even before the plants became sensationalized. It means that the prices of the plants puffed up even the pots, the pumice, and other garden supplies.
  21. 21. 21 “I should have tried what you taught Mike to this giganteum variegata. I was so excited and I cut and planted it,” I told Mike regretting of what I’ve done. He told me some techniques how to plant that is to half cut the stem, let it stay for a week or month before totally removing from the mother plant. You will see the cutting is already dry and consequently will not rot and die. I did this way of propagating to my other philodendron large foliage just like Jose Buono, dark lord, black majesty, and melalonii and it worked. The plant did not adjust so much and the leaves did not wither. After finishing my job related tasks, I go directly to my backyard garden and check my plants. I talk to them when they look sad, and appreciate them when I see them lively and vibrant. After the rain, they look revived, taken a bath, and refreshed. Looking at these plants, I can see the wonders of God’s creation. Just imagine the different genus of plant with different species, and each has its own beauty, design, and characteristics. For instance, I was so amazed by the peperomia genus that it can be propagated through its leaves. It has 1,000 species but what I have collected are only peperomia scadens, watermelon peperomia, peperomia obtusifolia, and pepperomia obtusifolia variegata. That means I still do not have the 996 kinds of peperomia varieties. (Variegata is a botanical term being used to indicate that the leaves or the stems have variegation, patches or spots in different colours because of mutation or genetics.) One time I bought an army and pink rose caladiums from an online seller together with the anthurium magnificum but the leaves were torn. “If not because of my daughter’s medicine, I would not sell my plants,” he said. Well, I said, at least I was an instrument by God that this man can buy medicine for his ailing child. His not so pretty and small anthurium magnificum now flaunts its magnificence and thanking me for the care that I gave. However, I had also bad experience when I was really attracted at the pictures of hosta plants available in seeds posted in the one of the ornamental groups in Facebook in South Cotabato. The pictures posted were very colourful and vibrant in different colors of pink, yellow, and yellow green with variegations. I let my husband picked the seeds in Digos City. After a week or two, it grew but very, very far from what I expected. It was a zinnia flower (resembling sunflower tribe.) It is sad to know that there are people who would fool others even during crisis just to make money. Looking at the plants would mean inspiration. It rejuvenates me, it makes me busy taking care of them that I am already satisfied staying at home. The repercussion is so strong that it gives me inner peace, joy, and contentment. It means hope, that when I see a budding leaf, a shoot, or another flower, it implies that’s God’s grace is there. If God blesses them with beauty and let them grow, how much more we, His people who are very precious in His eyes. -Esther D. Vinson
  22. 22. 22 Creative Nonfiction Analysis Framework A. Themes Guide Questions Answers 1. What is the underlying theme in the text? 2. Can you quote line/s from the text to support your answer? 3. Techniques 1. Does the author show creative license in the text? Support your answer if it is evident. Creative license Figure of speech 2. What figures of speech are being used by the writer? Cite them. Symbolism 3. Does the text use symbols to represent something? If there is, briefly explain your answer. Exposition 4. Is there an exposition part in the text? If yes, support your answer. Dialogue 5. Does the character/s have the throwing of dialogues? Provide an example. Imagery 6. Are there images in the text? What kinds of imagery are they? Irony 7. Is there a statement of irony from the text? If yes, support your answer.
  23. 23. 23 Assessment Multiple Choice. Choose the letter of the best answer. Write the chosen letter on a separate sheet of paper. 1. “I can hear the rushing of the wind, the rustling of the bamboo leaves, and the bubbling waters from the rivers.” What imagery is dominant in this statement? a. gustatory imagery b. auditory imagery c. tactile imagery d. visual imagery 2. What is the combination of fiction and nonfiction which are done in essay and story forms with setting, characterization, concepts, and facts? a. creative nonfiction b. creative writing c. science fiction d. literary genre 3. What genre is also called imaginative writing characterized by inventiveness of situation, perspective, or story? a. science fiction b. drama c. fiction d. diary 4. What literary element tells the central idea, thesis, or overall message that the story conveys? a. theme b. motif c. claim d. tone 5. What is the technique that goes beyond the conventions or using small distortions in handling factual materials? a. figures of speech b. creative license c. symbolism d. dialogue 6. “I have imported plants from Thailand. These are tomatoes, potatoes, squash, and ginger.” What kind of irony is this statement? a. situational irony b. dramatic irony c. verbal irony d. disparity
  24. 24. 24 7. “The carpenter builds structures but cannot build properly his own house.” What technique is used in this statement? a. exposition b. imagery c. theme d. irony 8. “The grasses dance gracefully to the music of the winds.” What is the technique used in this sentence? a. figure of speech b. creative license c. symbolism d. irony 9. What technique is used in creative nonfiction that allows the characters to explicitly talk to each other? a. creative license b. exposition c. dialogue d. irony 10.“I walk with my smiles up to my ears as I approach my friends.” What kind of figure of speech is this? a. personification b. metaphor c. hyperbole d. simile 11.Which of the following is expressed in correct form of a theme? a. Fulfilling dreams, building hopes, changing perspectives b. Having dreams will change the course of person’s life. c. Dream, believe, survive d. No vision, no success 12.Which of the following is NOT an example of creative nonfiction? a. nature writing b. food writing c. song d. blog 13. Which of the following is NOT the purpose of the dialogue? a. It provides information about the relationship of the characters. b. Characters’ thoughts and actions are revealed. c. It is a way of handling factual materials. d. It gives additional data about the plot.
  25. 25. 25 14.Which of the following words signifies the word “thorns”? a. choices b. dreams c. hopes d. trials 15.What imagery appeals to the sense of smelling? a. gustatory b. olfactory c. auditory d. tactile Additional Activities Search and read for a blog or Facebook status report. Pick only one and write the theme of the text on a separate sheet of paper. 1. Title of the text 2. Theme of the text 3. Quotation to support the theme 4. Techniques used in the text
  26. 26. 26 Answer Key Pre-Assessment 1. A 2. C 3. A 4. B 5. B 6. C 7. A 8. C 9. C 10.A 11.B 12.D 13.A 14.B 15.C What's In 1. Foreshadowing 2. Image 3. Literary genre 4. Literary technique 5. Figures of speech 6. Symbolism 7. Dramatic irony 8. Verbal irony 9. Theme 10.Diction Post Assessment 1. B 2. A 3. C 4. A 5. B 6. C 7. D 8. A 9. C 10.C 11.B 12.C 13.B 14.D 15.B
  27. 27. 27 References Creative Writing Curriculum Guide. (2016). K to 12 Senior High School Humanities and Social Sciences Strand Davison, M. (2017). Literary devices, techniques, and elements. Retrieved from https://www.pittsfordschools.org/site/handlers/filedownload.ashx?modulei nstanceid=542&dataid=4672&FileName=Literary%20Devices.pdf&fbclid=IwA R11N21vwh8bdSn1wR_hjIl0-ECsTosXju2KIb2ErNR4RS2wE3sobW6xPXk Writing Creative Nonfiction. Retrieved from https://davehood59.wordpress.com/2010/02/17/writing-creative- nonfiction/ Aguila, A., Galan, R., & Wigley, J. (2017). Telling the Truth: The Art of Creative Nonfiction. C & E Publishing, Inc. Quezon City
  28. 28. 28 DISCLAIMER This Self-Learning Module (SLM) was developed by DepEd SOCCSKSARGEN with the primary objective of preparing for and addressing the new normal. Contents of this module were based on DepEd’s Most Essential Learning Competencies (MELC). This is a supplementary material to be used by all learners in Region XII in all public schools beginning SY 2020-2021. The process of LR development was observed in the production of this module. This is version 1.0. We highly encourage feedback, comments, and recommendations For inquiries or feedback, please write or call: Department of Education – SOCCSKSARGEN Learning Resource Management System (LRMS) Regional Center, Brgy. Carpenter Hill, City of Koronadal Telefax No.: (083) 2288825/ (083) 2281893 Email Address: region12@deped.gov.ph

×