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The Future
of WorkMake the Future Work For You
Tracy Brower – Gianpaolo Barozzi - Antonia Cusumano – Dany DeGrave –
Mark E...
The FOW Community (FOWC) is a brand network of the world’s most
forward-thinking organizations that come together to explo...
Introduction
5 Things You Need to Know Regarding the Future of Work
Five Steps To Create The 21st Century Workforce Experi...
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  1. 1. The Future of WorkMake the Future Work For You Tracy Brower – Gianpaolo Barozzi - Antonia Cusumano – Dany DeGrave – Mark Edgar - Simon Elliot – Sara Sutton Fell – Antoinette Forth - Andy Jankowski – Tina Lai – Tom Lamberty - Lorne Rubis – John Sigmon – Wendy Smith
  2. 2. The FOW Community (FOWC) is a brand network of the world’s most forward-thinking organizations that come together to explore the future of work. We are comprised of individuals, internal change agents if you will, who are transforming and reshaping organizations and our own careers in preparation for the new world of work. The FOWC offers each of us a professional learning environment where we are continually teaching and learning from each other. The more communication and interaction between us, the more tacit knowledge is exchanged. As Aristotle said, “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” and we are helping one another understand, innovate within, and adapt to the workplace of the future. Knowledge sharing is the new competitive advantage and we are using it to see the future clearly and develop a proactive response in a world of constant change. Join us at: http://fowcommunity.com Connect with us: Twitter: fowcommunity Facebook: fowcommunity About The FOW Community
  3. 3. Introduction 5 Things You Need to Know Regarding the Future of Work Five Steps To Create The 21st Century Workforce Experience Time To Reinvent The Way We Work What’s Your Competitive Advantage When The Machines Take Over? Five Ways HR is Changing the Future of Work Five Ways Employee Amenities Are Changing The Future Of Work Five Ways HR is Changing the Future of Work: Managing Remote Workers and Freelancers The 50-Year Old Butterfly: 5 Critical Skills for the Workplace of the Future It’s Time to Rethink the Employer Employee Relationship Mentoring for Success: 5 Ways to Help Millennials Prepare Your Business for The Future of Work Are You An All In Leader? You Aren’t Very Good at Interviewing Today’s Consumer-WorkersTM Contents 4 5 10 16 20 22 26 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 Cover image credit: Jasper Sanidad jaspersanidad.com DISCLAIMER The contents or opinions in this publication are independent and may not necessarily reflect the policies or views of an organization.
  4. 4. Introduction The future of work has never before been as exciting or presented us with so many new opportunities to succeed as an individual and collectively as an organization. But with opportunities also comes a myriad of new challenges, including a fiercely competitive business world - a world that has shrunk thanks to the enablement of globalization by technology, and our willingness and desire to collaborate with others as nearby as in our own backyard to the far reaches of the globe. Most organizations, however, are not ready for the challenges of business world that is constantly in motion. They are not doing enough to meet the disruption of new digital and robotic technologies, shifting employee demographics, changing definitions of workplaces, the introduction of new workstyles, accelerated rates of innovation, the threat of cybercriminals, and a multitude of other trends that are impacting us all, whether we run a small business or lead a global organization. Not all organizations, however, are lagging behind. Many people within these organizations are taking a leadership role in determining what the future holds for the working world. Common among them are that they are FOW Community members and they all have a desire to take a proactive role in continuous learning and sharing to create a better world, while future-proofing their organizations and their careers. What follows is a compilation of articles contributed by individual members of the FOW Community and written expressly for this publication, the first in a series of publications that we will be producing. Our members have contributed their diverse perspectives about the future of work, each from a different lens. Their thoughts and insights may not be the “answers” to your challenges but their ideas and concepts from their heterogeneous domains of work could inspire you. Tackling the future of work requires a collective effort by many, and while many of the articles hail from an HR perspective, isn’t people where it all starts? Connie Chan Co-Founder, The FOW Community 4
  5. 5. Five Things You Need to Know Regarding the Future of Work By Dr. Tracy Brower, PhD, MM, MCR, Global VP of Workplace Vitality for Mars Pick up any book or article in the past six months and it’s impossible not to be awash in perspectives on all that is changing in the workplace. Competition is increasing, global business is ubiquitous, and traditional boundaries between companies are collapsing. Workers are changing, work is changing, and workplace is changing. At the same time, we are under unprecedented pressure to contribute with speed and substance, and to deliver results. The bar is high and it’s getting higher all the time. What kinds of results are required? Research in Bring Work to Life by Bringing Life to Work: A Guide for Leaders and Organizations , suggests that senior leaders prioritize key business drivers like shareholder value, growth, customer satisfaction, and market leadership. The way to accomplish these results is through creating fulfillment for people – when organizations take approaches that serve people and create great workplaces, they increase the likelihood of overall success for the company. Ultimately, this success and the future of work will be about fueling the intersection of engagement, collaboration, well being, and productivity. Through these efforts, companies can in turn deliver results. Companies want to create the future, not just react to it – and we know that passion, purpose, and place combine to reflect five key realities that will dictate success going forward. 5
  6. 6. Today, the emerging model of employment is based on aligning work with talent. The ‘Hollywood model’ in which teams regularly form and re-form based on projects rather than functional silos is becoming the norm. The most successful companies will embrace this new pattern of work and tap into talent which is increasingly selective about their work. The employer brand will matter more than ever since companies will constantly need to attract the best and the brightest employees who have a lot of options about which companies they join. They will choose where to contribute based on a match to their passions and skills. Social media applications such as Glassdoor will guarantee a previously-unknown level of transparency. Companies will need to manage their reputations and their brands such that they can attract, engage, and retain talent. In addition, these more amorphic employee teams will require leaders to quickly acclimate new members, set direction, build teams, and foster a climate of results. Overall, success will require identifying talent and providing opportunities for people to channel it into the work that is the best fit for their passions. The future of work will be about purpose. It will be about organizational culture and leadership. 2.Tapping into Passion 1.Prioritizing People. Ours is a service and knowledge economy. The way companies create value – ultimately – is through people as our most critical resource. Attracting them, retaining them, engaging them, sustaining them, and motivating them will be the most important job of every leader in every company. Consider this logic train: a great work experience motivates people who can in turn do their best to create value for customers and the company. The logic train works with almost any variable we affect. Leadership skills, workplace, and training approaches are examples. Through any of these, we’re seeking to positively affect employees so they can in turn deliver for the company. The best companies will recognize this logic train and prioritize programs and processes that make the greatest contribution to the employee experience. Companies need to tap into employees’ discretionary effort – the above- and-beyond time that employees are willing to spend when they are passionate about their work and feel good about the company to whom they’re making a contribution. Companies must determine people’s interest and skills and align job responsibilities accordingly. The future of work will be about people and their work. 6
  7. 7. Organizational culture is defined as the norms, values, and patterns of behavior in an organization. It is ‘the way things get done around here’ or ‘what people do when no one is looking’. As the speed of change increases, culture will be the constant, and it will create a sense of overall purpose and context for employees. It is the one element that provides insulation against competition. Competitors can copy strategies, mimic marketing plans, and even hire away talent, but culture is the one aspect of an organization that is hardest to duplicate. It is also the element in an organization that guides behaviors and performance. It is therefore a cornerstone for companies that create their own future. Successful companies will consciously assess and manage culture and recognize that it cannot be left to chance. In addition, effective companies will consider all of their policies and approaches – from hiring practices and development approaches to compensation, measurement, and well-being practices – in order to ensure they are aligned with the purpose they are pursuing and the kind of culture they are seeking to create and constantly renew. Of course organizational culture is deeply affected by leadership in organizations, and leaders are in a critical role to give people a sense of purpose and the bigger picture. Leaders engage employees in the vision, select employees, assemble teams, set expectations, reinforce performance, and reward outcomes. In addition, as people begin to work differently – in terms of where they work, when they work, and how they work – leaders will need to lead differently. Effective leadership will be based on managing total outcomes, not simply on ensuring employees’ presence in the office. In addition, because of their visibility and position, leaders send cues to the organization about what is accepted and valued in the organization. Leaders shape policies and their practices and decisions have significant impacts on their employees. The most successful organizations will attend to leadership by ensuring they are selecting the best leaders, holding leaders accountable, continually developing leaders, and providing feedback so leaders can continuously improve – and in turn develop and continuously improve their teams and be a positive influence on the people around them. Finally, the future of work will be about place, specifically, the workplace. 3.Culture 4.Leadership 7
  8. 8. Tracy Brower @TracyBrower108 https://www.linkedin.com/pub/tracy-brower- phd/6/2b/336 tracy.brower@effem.com Dr. Tracy Brower, PhD, MM, MCR is the Global VP of Workplace Vitality for Mars Drinks and the author of Bring Work to Life by Bringing Life to Work: A Guide for Leaders and Organizations which focuses on work-life fulfillment. Mars Drinks creates great-tasting moments at work and is a 100% workplace dedicated segment of Mars, Incorporated. Mars Drinks supports businesses who want to provide great working environments for their people by inspiring workplace engagement, collaboration, productivity and well-being. 5.Workplace The future will bring with it a paradox. Our technology has created a world in which we won’t need to come to work in order to do work. Employees can increasingly work from anywhere: their homes, third places, or fourth places (think, workclubs). So if people don’t have to come to work in order to do work, why would they show up? For the social contact, collaboration, and relationships. The workplace needs to be a magnet and a destination. It must provide the best value equation for an employee who can choose to work anywhere. Humans are wired to connect and when we feel good about the people and relationships around us, our brains release the feel-good neurotransmitter oxytocin . This causes us to want to repeat positive experiences. Workplaces that give people a chance to connect in a ‘coffee shop experience’ provide for this social craving. When new employees join an organization, they want to rub elbows with others . They want to learn and connect and grow their networks. Workplaces that have places for connecting over coffee or comfortable zones for impromptu conversations will be best positioned to take advantage of this social reality. The seeds of the future are planted now and we can begin creating the future today by smartly anticipating it. Create passion by focusing on people and the work that means the most to them. Prioritize purpose by ensuring culture and leaders are context for organizational success. And create a place that stimulates, enlivens, and fosters connections among co-workers. The future of work will be about inspiring passion and purpose in the workplace by fostering engagement, collaboration, well-being, and productivity. These will be what dictate success in the future. 8
  9. 9. i Brower, Bring Work to Life by Bringing Life to Work: A Guide for Leaders and Organizations, Bibliomotion, 2014. ii Ibid. iii Dishman, Lydia. What Glassdoor has Learned from Seven Years of Studying Other Companies, Fast Company, July 17, 2015. Retrieved on July 19, 2015: http://www.fastcompany.com/3048590/lessons-learned/ what-glassdoor-has-learned-from-seven-years-of-studying-other-companies iv Brower, Tracy. Bring Work to Life by Bringing Life to Work: A Guide for Leaders and Organizations, Bibliomotion Publishing, 2014. v Lieberman, Matthew. Social, Crown Publishing, 2013. vi Brower, Tracy. Bring Work to Life by Bringing Life to Work: A Guide for Leaders and Organizations, Bibliomotion Publishing, 2014. References 9
  10. 10. Five Steps To Create The 21st Century Workforce Experience By Gianpaolo Barozzi, Senior Director, HR and Tom Lamberty, HR Manager, Cisco Global Talent Management “Disrupt – or be disrupted” is the new norm in almost every major market across the globe, including the global talent market. The “world of work” – how talent is identified, leveraged, allocated and engaged, and how work is organized, measured and rewarded – is exponentially impacted by an increasingly competitive, complex and rapidly changing business environment. To succeed organizations must transform their culture and their practices to create an innovative work experience to manage this exponential change. There are five key components that are success-critical to this transformation: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Their combination will create, shape and realize the 21st century workforce experience. Introducing a new “people deal” Being essential to establishing a foundation for adaptive, agile organizations, which will be fueled by... A new reputation-based culture; forming... An environment empowering real-time talent transformation, driven and enabled by the use of... Innovative technologies 10
  11. 11. Employee Value Propositions won’t do anymore. Lifetime employment is over. On the other hand it will be impossible to build a lasting, and innovative business without engaged employees. Hoffman, Casnocha and Yeh analyzed this dilemma in their book “The Alliance” – and started to think of employees as “allies”. Engagement needs to become a two-way-road: between the employee and the organization and vice- versa. That’s where the “new people deal” comes in: representing both the heart and the backbone of the relationship between an organization and its talent. The organization providing a compelling story of why it exists, how it works and what it is offering to anyone joining it – in an inclusive and inspiring way. This is complemented by and matched into a clear outline of what is expected from employees willing to engage. Hence creating a mutual foundation where loyalty, trust and joint values are forming an explicit deal against which both parties commit for shared success. Organizations are becoming much bolder and more credible in enabling and introducing innovative workforce practices. The “new people deal” is going to be core for any organization preparing to transition from today’s static structures to more agile and adaptive forms and procedures. It will be the essential “contractual” basis for the creation of a self-adaptive talent marketplace and brokerage model, which allows for dynamic allocation of the right talent to the right assignment at the right time. This provides the organizational agility and adaptability to succeed in a Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous (VUCA) market environment. The talent marketplace is going to become the hub where challenging work assignments, innovations ready for incubation and development assignments focused on emerging skill sets meet with the skills and aspirations of the employees. The opportunity to work on diverse assignments, in different areas, on inspiring teams will be key for people to achieve their potential in a way that helps the organization realize its own potential. The diagram below outlines the main stages and characteristics of the evolution towards an agile and adaptive organizational framework. 1.Redefine Employee Engagement: A New People Deal 2.Re-Invent The Org Structure: The Adaptive Organization 11
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. The agile and adaptive organization is going to be embedded in a highly transparent corporate culture, fueled by ongoing peer feedback, real-time check-ins (#gladtobehere) and a personal reputation index. This cultural environment will make employees and leaders proud to share their personal brand with those in the organization and outside the company (e.g., external talent platforms). Reputation – composed by professional impact, successes, experiences, capabilities and aspirations, as well as recommendations, endorsement and feedback – will become the de-facto currency in the talent marketplace: A reputation-based culture is going to be the vital ecosystem enabling organizations to transform their talent in real time by removing the roadblocks of traditional process-heavy hiring and allocation mechanisms. And it will synchronize talent transformation with the speed at which organizations need to transform themselves and their business. Current and future assignments and related skill sets will be visible and accessible for all employees. Employees will be supported by their leaders in building the reputation and experience required to acquire these assignments, ensuring their short- and long-term employability and continuously transforming themselves. 3.Leverage Talent Transparency: Reputation-Based Culture 4.Remove The Roadblocks: Real-Time Talent Transformation Individual Reputation: To access best fit, engaging and challenging assignments Leadership Reputation: To attract the best talent to work on their assignments Employer Reputation: To attract, engage and develop the best talent in the market 13
  14. 14. 5.Cut The Edge: From Information Technology To Innovation Technology The adaptive organization, reputation-based culture and real-time transformation will only be possible through the innovative use of technology. The advent of cloud computing – essentially migrating the management of applications and data to agile, scalable cloud providers – dramatically transforms the traditional Information Technology (IT) operating model. It opens up a huge variety of opportunities for organizations to utilize technology in a much more innovative way to drive their business and engage their talent – bringing the People Deal to live. Technology is becoming the key enabler and driver for more: IT will be moving from the basement to the boardroom taking over a role as a strategic partner for the organization – in transforming its business models and the organization itself. Efficient ways of collaboration (e.g., mobile video as a key component to feel =connected, messaging and social media platforms) Flexible ways of working (e.g., work from anywhere, anytime on any device; smart kiosks in offices to personalize the work environment) Impactful ways of turning data into information (e.g., smart analytics to support business decisions) The 21st Century Workforce Experience: Transparent Adaptive Talent Marketplaces Starting off with new people deals, adaptive organizations and reputation-based cultures will radically transform the way people can be at their best every day at work. In the new “world of work” titles and formal roles will become futile and irrelevant for employees and leaders to qualify themselves and achieve their goals. The 21st Century Workforce Experience – an intelligent combination of the components outlined above – will be made possible by utilizing cutting-edge technology in innovative ways. Enabling employees to connect and collaborate to increase innovation will benefit them and the organization. Their “world of work” will be more effective than ever before – increasing their impact and degree of freedom. Innovative technology is going to provide the flexibility, choice and opportunity organizations need to drive business impact and customer value in unparalleled ways. The future begins with a New People Deal. 14
  15. 15. • Hoffman R, Casnocha B, Yeh C “The Alliance”, Harvard Business Review Press, 2014 • “Our People Deal”, Cisco Systems, http://www.cisco.com/c/r/weare/people-deal.html • Bersin, J. et al. (eds., 2015): Global Human Capital Trends 2015, Deloitte University Press • Glad to Be Here ® - http://johnfoleyinc.com/ • McGrath R.G. “The end of competitive advantage”, Harvard Business Review Press, 2013 References Gianpaolo Barozzi Email: gbarozzi@cisco.com LinkedIn: it.linkedin.com/in/gianpaolobarozzi Gianpaolo Barozzi is an HR Sr Director within the Cisco Global Talent Management organization. His current responsibilities include enterprise- wide leadership for career enablement, management development and internal talent marketplace. Gianpaolo is based in Milan, Italy, and holds a degree in Physics. His passion for science, design thinking and the blend of theory and experiments is the foundation of his characteristic innovative and future- looking professional forma mentis. Tom Lamberty Email: tolamber@cisco.com LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/isberlin Twitter: @MerveVerlag Tom joined Cisco in 2011 in the role of a Human Resources Manager focusing on innovation enablement and recently people leadership. He has a background as an HR Consultant with Hewitt Associates and held a broad range of HR roles with Siemens beforehand. Exercises: New People Deal 1. Do you have a clear and visible story to tell about why you exist as an organization, who you are, what you do, and why someone should join your organization? 2. Do you explicitly outline what your employees can expect of your organization and what the organization expects of them? Agile and Adaptive Organizations 1. Does your organization feel the pressure to become more agile and adaptive? 2. If so, are you embarking on a journey toward building an agile and adaptive organization? Where is your organization heading as of today and what needs to change? 15
  16. 16. Time To Reinvent The Way We Work By Antonia Cusumano, US Technology Industry, People and Organization Lead Our world has changed. In a remarkably short period of time, it has become digitally connected. But even as businesses strive to innovate, most have not yet seized the opportunity to change the way employees work. In fact, the way we work has not fundamentally changed for 30 years. That has to change. Both the tools and desire are there. According to PwC’s 18th annual Global CEO survey: 77% of CEOs believe that digital technologies are creating value for internal and external collaboration 61% of CEOs think socially enabled business processes are strategic to their business 88% of CEOs believe digital technologies are creating quite high or very high value in operational efficiency Executives are realizing that reinventing the way their organizations work can drive measurable performance gains in value, growth and leadership. As one CEO survey respondent noted, it’s important to “think differently. We get awfully wedded to what might have been successful in the past, and that sometimes can trap us.” 16
  17. 17. We believe there are seven ways companies can avoid that trap, and reinvent work to fuel competitive advantage. 1.Recharge productivity to access information and take action anytime, anywhere and on any device. This involves making a proactive shift from a world in which employees communicate statically, create individually, comment in isolation, and consolidate asynchronously. The destination? A world of active engagement where employees communicate dynamically to create together, where they can share ideas and documents in real-time. 2.Rethink innovation so new ideas can build from across your organization. According to our survey, 71% of CEOs believe digital technologies are creating quite high or very high value in innovation capacity. In fact, the ideas with the greatest impact are created by boundaryless groups who can tackle problems with a broader perspective. Hierarchy does not create innovation; adaptable teams who can reach out for expertise anywhere in the organization do. But to do so, they need digital access to find the right colleagues and access the right information. 3.Reimagine knowledge management through better search and storage. On average, knowledge workers spend 62% of their day lost in email and information. Capturing, developing, sharing and using organizational knowledge and data should be an accelerator to innovation, rather than a roadblock. KM today is a labyrinth with thousands of documents, subjective document ratings, multiple versions, tags-gone-wild and impossible searching. Reinventing KM through a unified platform with best-in-class search-and-storage capabilities sparks enterprise intellectual firepower and makes sense of big data within an organization. 4.Recreate context for global advantage. Global collaboration can be as easy as local collaboration, where colleagues can pick up editing of documents at the start of the day right where others left off at the end of their day. The use of translation tools and other collaboration software have simplified the process, and network advancements have provided employees with access to data even in parts of the world with low bandwidth. 17
  18. 18. That’s an ambitious slate, but by following a plan, enterprises can achieve it. In order to develop an integrated experience to drive near-term value and sustainability, enterprises should embark on five key activities: 5.Rewire work to be more like life. Only 15% of people prefer the technology they have at work to the technology they have at home – yet the lines between work and life have been permanently blurred. Employees are increasingly demanding that work software be as accessible as consumer software, which means not only heightened usability but also the ability to be constantly connected with anytime, anywhere access to information that enhances their ability to be productive. Leading companies today realize they need to respond to this seismic shift to attract and retain the top talent. 6.Redefine the workforce Just as the way employees collaborate is changing, so too is the makeup of the workforce. It’s becoming global, multi- generational, and incorporating freelancers and partners more than ever before. For enterprises, that presents a challenge of applying the right capabilities to the right problem at the right time. Providing the virtual workforce with a secure platform on which to collaborate and innovate will be key, as will rapidly integrating capabilities into teams that are immediately productive while still short-term and fluid in their makeup. Enterprises will need to find, engage, and transport on board (and off) this new workforce seamlessly. 7.Reshape security Making data and colleagues quickly and reliably available frequently requires moving to the cloud, which brings its concerns about data privacy and security. Several recent crippling security breaches took place on non-cloud hosted infrastructure and email systems, attacks that could have been defended more reliably on a cloud platform. Enterprises need a trusted cloud framework to eliminate security concerns. Identify clear value drivers to develop the tailored roadmap for your business, supported with a strong business case Leverage pilot projects to co-create innovative solutions tailored for your business and exercise prototypes with early adopters Attack system integration and application remediation head-on to proactively address interdependencies specific to your IT ecosystem Manage analytics-driven dashboards that give you real-time insight into the change and adoption throughout the journey, allowing you to take actions where needed to reduce risk and Increase value Execute a go-to-market launch program incorporating the latest techniques to drive adoption, behavior change, and a cultural shift 18
  19. 19. It can be done. PwC has tracked the stock performance of multiple companies before and after they embarked on digital transformation and noted there has been significant increase in shareholder value compared to the rest of the market Overall, the result of these efforts can create a measurable win-win-win situation: an improved employee experience; new efficiencies; and new revenue growth opportunities. All it takes is a concerted effort to mobilize employees to think, decide and act together in new ways and at new velocities, to ultimately create a new enterprise agility. Antonia Cusumano @antoniacb https://www.linkedin.com/in/antoniacusumano Toni Cusumano has 20 years of experience helping global businesses achieve their business strategies through organization and people. She is passionate about co-creating innovative solutions that help solve people and HR issues. How do you create more agility in your organization to move faster to market? How do you find and retain the right talent? Are you leveraging social to create a Connected Employee Experience? PricewaterhouseCoopers has exercised reasonable care in the collecting, processing, and reporting of this information but has not independently verified, validated, or audited the data to verify the accuracy or completeness of the information. PricewaterhouseCoopers gives no express or implied warranties, including but not limited to any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose or use and shall not be liable to any entity or person using this document, or have any liability with respect to this document. This report is for general purposes only, and is not a substitute for consultation with professional advisors. It is intended for internal use only by the recipient and should not be provided in writing or otherwise to any other third party without PricewaterhouseCoopers express written consent. © 2015 PwC. All rights reserved. PwC refers to the US member firm or one of its subsidiaries or affiliates, and may sometimes refer to the PwC network. Each member firm is a separate legal entity. Please see www. pwc.com/structure for further details. PwC US helps organizations and individuals create the value they’re looking for. We’re a member of the PwC network of firms in 157 countries with more than 195,000 people who are committed to delivering quality in assurance, tax and advisory services. Tell us what matters to you and find out more by visiting us at www. pwc.com/us. 19
  20. 20. What’s your competitive advantage when the machines take over? By Dany DeGrave, Sr. Director Unconventional Innovation & Networks Sanofi Pasteur It is striking to see how the same job can be executed in different ways in different regions of the world. In the US a road construction STOP sign will be held up by a person while in Europe typically a robot will do the same. The personnel cost is higher in Europe hence the approach with a robot is more quickly cost-effective. Image Credit: Andy Shupe You are probably not surprised by this example as it makes perfect economic sense. Why would you pay a human to get the job done when a machine can do it at least as effectively, 24/7 if needed, without the need for sick days or kid-football game time off, and cheaper? We are used to these evolutions in the world of work. The travel agent, the music store employee, the parking lot cashier and many more have been replaced by electronic transactions. Brick laying and grass mowing robots made their entry. We are not surprised to see typical manual jobs disappear as a result of technological innovation. We actually like the convenience it brings to our life. You can’t be replaced by a machine. Or can you? But what if your job was next? Yes, the job that pays well because of the expertise you built up over so many years, because of your skills in extracting valuable insights from the information and data you handle all the time, because of your unique capabilities in doing things computers can’t do? How would your company react when, just like for the STOP sign worker, a choice became possible: replace your activity by a machine or continue to employ you as long as you remain cheaper than machines? If history is any guidance we know the answer. That choice is becoming a reality because of exponential advances in multiple domains; exponential meaning that the progress made in the next few years exceeds all progress so far in that domain. The unthinkable becoming a reality almost overnight. In the last ten years Facebook connected a billion people and the smartphone provided us with a camera, a music player, a GPS-system and much more in our pockets. Self-driving cars, cheap genetic testing, and artificial intelligence will be commonplace in the next decade. 20
  21. 21. Your intelligence versus artificial intelligence While computers continuously became faster, smaller, and cheaper the underlying principles remained the same: executing tasks according to pre-defined rules. Now we are entering a new age, the age of cognitive computing where computers can think, understand and learn like humans, where computers can connect the dots without pre-defined rules. And they can do it way faster and accurate than humans. They can objectively propose insights based on vastly larger information sources of structured and non-structured data than is humanly possible to treat. This is not science fiction. Hospitals and doctors are already using tools like IBM Watson to support diagnosis and treatment options, law offices and scientists are using it to accelerate their research, newspapers use it to automatically write news stories. Any activity that includes analyzing and using complex and even unstructured information, likely a good part of your job, can now be done faster, cheaper, better with artificial intelligence. Just like for the road construction worker with the STOP sign the question will arise if your pay level remains justified, and if your job remains relevant. The unknown is not if it is going to happen but rather when, for you, in your company, in your industry. How to remain relevant? We have come to realize that the idea of a career at a company is outdated. The idea of a job, a role might go the same way. As technology continues to get better at activities until recently thought to be exclusive to humans we need to ask ourselves the question how to remain relevant in the workplace? How to postpone the day most of our job can be done by a machine? And ask that question now so we have some time left to prepare. The answer is likely to be very personal and require decisions and choices to be made. Which other unused or underdeveloped skills could I apply in my current job or use to move to another job that is less at risk for automation? How can I make myself a more flexible employee, more multi-skilled? What can I learn and master that is still too difficult for technology? How can I integrate these new tools in my job and augment my performance, making myself complementary with machine intelligence? Maybe it is time to start this side activity I have been dreaming about, and have this as my backup plan? Or can I be the person leading the change, implementing these new ways of working? Because change is hard only a small fraction of possible technological advance is used by companies. What if I am part of this select group of people able to direct automation, to imagine the next frontier? Your job will be replaced by software and hardware. What’s your plan for tomorrow? What’s your personal competitive advantage going to be? 21 Dany DeGrave Twitter: @danydegrave LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/danydegrave
  22. 22. Five Ways HR is Changing the Future of Work By Mark Edgar – SVP HR, RSA Canada A lot has been written about the future of work and while many of the opinions are consistent there continues to be a lot of different views out there. It is important that the modern HR professional is well versed in the different trends affecting the future of work. But in my view that’s just the start, as there is a much bigger game to play and HR has the most critical role in ensuring organizations are prepared for the future of work. Let me explain why by outlining the five ways HR is changing the future of work. Source: Coolest Offices 22
  23. 23. 1.We’re the custodians of the organizational culture ‘How things get done around here’ is the most pragmatic and common definition of organizational culture that I have come across. While the definition is simple, the reality of organizational culture is very complex. It’s multi-layered, ambiguous and hard to change. The future of work demands a different culture driven by different expectations from a multi-generational workforce, new and disruptive technologies and increased competition. As custodians of the organizational culture, HR’s role is to shape it, nurture it and evolve it as it will likely need to change again. At RSA Canada, we talk a lot about building an ‘agile culture’. Our organization has more than 300 years of experience of the working world so we see ‘agility’ as a key enabler to ensure we’re around for the next 300 years. An agile culture will allow us to quickly adapt to changing circumstances by ensuring people have clarity around our vision and feel empowered to get us there. 2.We own the talent strategy In 2014, 63% of CEOs were seriously concerned about the availability of skills (source: PWC’s 17th Annual Global CEO Survey), a 5pt increase on 2013 suggesting their concern is growing. Having the right capabilities in your organization is a critical part of preparing for the future of work so you need a thoughtful and integrated talent strategy. When building your strategy you need to take in to account the disruptions that are occurring to the world of talent. This includes a change to the make-up of an organization’s talent pool with over half of the respondents to a Deloitte survey predicting that their need for contingent or on-demand workers will grow over the next 3 to 5 years. Also the way people are looking for jobs is changing with nearly 50% of the workforce using Glassdoor for job search. And then you have the much- debated millennial generation who are looking for something different from work – purpose, progression and flexibility. All of these factors make the creation of a future-proof talent agenda a key component when preparing for the future of work. 23
  24. 24. 3.We’re accountable for the employee experience Recent research from Gallup showed that less than one-third of workers in the US were engaged in their jobs. While still a relatively new subject in organizational theory terms, we all know that engagement continues to be the Holy Grail for many organizations and therefore HR professionals. At RSA we see a correlation between engagement and the employee experience. The hygiene factors around having the right tools and the right facilities can’t be ignored, but increasingly these are just table stakes for the modern discerning employee. The real value comes from being able to customize the employee experience to meet the different needs of different populations at work. In many cases this requires HR professionals to think outside of their traditional ways of working and rip up the proverbial rulebook that they often hide behind. At RSA we have challenged ourselves to be more flexible about where people work and we have also had success with our new ‘bring your own device’ policy, but we have more to do. A good place for us to start was mapping our current employee experience and identifying the areas where we could maximize the impact by making meaningful changes. 4.We own the leadership agenda One of my favourite leadership quotes is from John Maxwell. ‘A leader is the one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way’. The HR function holds a unique position in being able to influence the leadership agenda across the organization. We need to use this power strategically to shift the organizational culture by identifying, developing and embedding the leadership qualities that will deliver the desired outcome. At RSA we have had success in building our leader’s awareness of the changing internal and external environment and giving them some practical tools so they are equipped to support their teams. We have also seen the value of recruiting some new, disruptive and distributed leaders to help accelerate the change we are looking for. 24
  25. 25. Mark Edgar mark.edgar@rsagroup.ca @MarkEdgarHR ca.linkedin.com/pub/mark-edgar/1/460/89/en Mark Edgar joined RSA in January 2011 in the role of Vice President, Human Resources with overall responsibility for HR across all companies within RSA Canada. Previously Mark was based in the UK as Head of Human Resources within Centrica Plc; a major energy company operating in the UK under the British Gas brand. Mark has also worked for BSkyB, a TV, broadband and phone company, in an HR role responsible for their operational business units and customer facing teams. Mark holds a BSc (Hons) in Management Sciences from the University of Warwick and is a member of The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. 5.We can lead by example My own research shows that in 75% of organizations, HR is responsible for the future of work strategy and plans within their respective organizations. HR can only play this critical role if it has credibility. While credibility can be built a number of different ways, I think the most effective technique is by modernizing your own HR function and fully embracing the future of work ethos. Not only does this demonstrate your commitment to the future but it also allows you to pilot some of your ideas before rolling them out to the wider business. It’s clear the future of work is coming so burying your head in the sand isn’t an option. Instead from one HR professional to the other, seize the opportunity embrace it, learn about it and deliver it for your organization. This is our moment to shine! 25
  26. 26. Five Ways Employee Amenities Are Changing The Future Of Work By Simon Elliot, Director Business Development, Aramark And Lifeworks Restaurant Group The way in which we work has changed and continues to evolve. As the Greek Philosopher Heraclitus said: “Nothing endures but change. There is nothing permanent except change. All is flux, nothing stays still.” The demographics of the workforce have changed as the wave of Millennials and generations behind them arrive at work. Today’s workforce is truly global with different cultural requirements and expectations. The nature of work has changed. There is far greater emphasis on knowledge and a heightened battle in the War for Talent. Areas of focus for employers of the future include understanding the key drivers of change: Tomorrow’s generations have different expectations of the employer relationship. The workforce culture is different and more diverse than ever before. Advances in technology mean access to information, 24/7, from anywhere. Competition for people is fierce, especially in sectors such as technology. For those organizations that do embrace this change, accommodating this evolution will require the creation of a workplace experience where employees want to work rather than have to work. The future of work is about the Workplace Experience. Those able to design the space, create an ambiance and culture, and develop appropriate amenities will be best placed to address one of the most critical business imperatives of the coming decade(s) - Winning the War for Talent. 26
  27. 27. 1.The workplace experience A desk, phone, cubicle, and a vending machine won’t cut it. Employee amenities are no longer a cafeteria, treadmill, and a grubby old break room. The most progressive workplaces drive a quality workplace experience that is tailor-made to your enterprise workforce profile. Yes, every organization is different and the experience will reflect the history, culture, geography, and diversity. Creating emotional connections is fundamental. Delivering a physical experience that reflects the history, leadership, and values of the organization builds and reinforces culture. How those individuals who collectively make up the workforce can relate to this in a way that inspires them will build engagement, loyalty, and advocacy. 2.Convenience, community, connectivity and collaboration As the workplace evolution continues, the opportunities for quality, one-on-one human interaction diminish with increased reliance on technology and remote working. The reduced face-to-face time window is accentuated for its need to be a quality experience. Sharing a meal has been at the center of community since the beginning of humankind. This is a great starting point when building the workplace community of the future. What better place to create the focal point of your community than a great eating experience? The food spaces of the future will vary in size and nature—they include everything from cool coffee shop hangouts, to themed pub restaurants, cool re-energize zones, cafés, pop-ups, and lounges. What is common is that these environments are authentic, innovative, interesting, and inclusive. Ultimately, it’s a key investment in your workplace experience. These food, community, and collaboration spaces are open throughout the day. Use them creatively for meetings over a coffee, team lunches, quiet afternoon one-to-ones, employee appreciation, special events, meetings after hours, even massage, yoga, and Pilates. These community hubs are where the workforce of the future will come to meet, nourish, thrive, and come up with the next big idea. As Elton Mayo concluded in his Hawthorne Studies way back in the 1920s and 1930s, productivity is affected by the quality and frequency of human social interaction. This in turn helps our health and well-being, our feeling of belonging, our connectivity, and our ability to collaborate. 27
  28. 28. 3.Technology The evolution of technology has been a major driver behind change in the workplace, delivering new ways to create, share, and get things done. This will continue and likely accelerate into the future as history has shown us in the past. Today’s population is connected in every part of their lives. They can use a single device to wake them up, check their day’s calendar, emails, news, their health/fitness information, and their favorite movies to stream on their commute to work. These smart devices are a part of daily life and routine already and will be ever more so into the future. How can this be leveraged to drive a positive workplace experience? It is likely that attendance at a place of work will continue to decline. However, the need will still be there, just less frequent with the requirement for a higher quality, more productive experience. However one may get to the office of the future, whether a driverless car, shuttle, or via a “Beam Me Up, Scotty” device, integrating employee amenities will be key. 4.Comfort, health and well-being A healthy workforce is also a happy and productive workforce. Investment should go beyond the on-site fitness center, break rooms, and restaurants that will be a cost of entry employee amenity as we move forward. The workplace will be a place to be healthy as a result of thoughtful design of seating, desks, and spaces and workplaces to encourage exercise. Other elements of your strategic plan may include access to on-site doctors, therapists, and health and nutrition counselors. You might provide on-site classes including Pilates, yoga, and boot camps. Also, menus must be not only delicious but also healthy. Some companies are already eliminating sodas, chips, fried foods, and candy from the workplace. But what about those remote workers? Just like in a lot of cars today, workers of tomorrow will be reminded to slow down, take a rest, replenish their energy, and take lunch. They will be encouraged to log off the company network. And the business benefits to having a healthier workforce? A more engaged and effective workforce with less absenteeism, less presenteeism, and reduced healthcare costs. 28
  29. 29. The first steps to understanding the employee amenities for the future of any organization are to recognize and identify the value of investing in a program of change. This will vary by enterprise and will be influenced by what you do, where you do it, and your workforce profile. Selecting the right employee amenities that deliver the best Value on Investment (VOI) will reflect amenities that drive convenience, work-life integration, employee satisfaction, and engagement. The key value drivers include your ability to attract and retain the best talent, heightened engagement levels, and ultimately increased organizational effectiveness and productivity. There’s a large range of options to consider: 5.The employee amenities of the future Simon Elliot @CATERForce https://www.linkedin.com/in/simonelliot Simon Elliot is a Fellow of The Institute of Directors, Member of The Chartered Institute of Personnel & Management, CORENET and IFMA and is a Director of The British American Business Council (Northern California). Simon has been in the Food & Facilities Management business for 20+ years working with Clients in the UK, Western and Eastern Europe, Australasia, Asia and North America. He is currently Director of Business Development at Aramark & LifeWorks Restaurant Group advising Fortune 500 Clients on campus food services and employee amenities. Elliot-Simon@Aramark.com (415) 806-5411 www.lifeworksrestaurants.com 29
  30. 30. Five Ways HR is Changing the Future of Work: Managing Remote Workers and Freelancers By Sara Sutton Fell, CEO and Founder, Flexjobs When I founded Flexjobs in 2007 as a completely remote company, remote working was still a fairly new concept. Over the first few years, when asked about my company- -what we did, where we were based--it took a while to explain that we were fully virtual and all worked from home, and that we were also helping job seekers find real opportunities to do this themselves. Remote and flexible work options were simply not the norm. Today, however, I’ve noticed it takes far less time to explain the concept--folks generally understand what it means to be a remote worker. It’s becoming a more normal, accepted way of doing work from an HR perspective. On the whole, when, where, and how we work has changed rapidly over the last few years, and all signs point to the continuation of this transformation. 34 million workers telecommute at least occasionally in the U.S., and it’s expected to be 63 million by 2016, “fueled by worldwide broadband adoption, better collaboration tools, and growing management experience.” The number of freelancers is following the same trend. By 2020, it’s expected that more than 40 percent of all workers, over 60 million people, will be freelancers. Here are five ways HR is changing the future of work when it comes to managing remote workers and the freelance economy. 1.Normalizing Remote Work The more companies adopt remote work as an acceptable and mutually beneficial way of doing business, rather than just an employee “perk,” the more normal it becomes. HR departments at companies like Aetna, Xerox, and Dell are leading by example with remote work because they realize a long-overlooked truth: it actually benefits companies to let people work from home. More on that to come. HR professionals used to be wary of the idea of widespread at-home work for their employees. As more people work from home either partially or fully, fears about slacking and decreased productivity are proven false. Countless studies released about telecommuting in the last few years shows the opposite--that telecommuters are actually more productive than their in-office coworkers. With HR’s support, remote work has become an inevitable part of the future of work. 2.Modernizing Management Techniques So many of our traditional management techniques stem from a 20th century way of thinking, where workers reported to an office building, sat at an assigned desk, and where a large definition of a “good worker” was 30
  31. 31. that they were simply in the office “working.” But that was at a time when we didn’t have seemingly endless distractions like social media, ecommerce, online games, etc., that are now accessible from our desks, nor did we have the technological mobility of smart phones and tablets. Face time still plays an all-too-heavy factor in our determination of someone’s productivity and value as an employee, but HR’s adoption of remote work and freelance professionals is positively impacting how we actually manage people. With remote and freelance workers, face time is simply not an option, so managers, with the help of HR training, must grow their techniques to emphasize results. And I’m not just talking about the final, finished product, but the daily, weekly, and monthly work someone does. Managers of remote workers and freelancers must be proactive communicators, regularly reaching out to help professionals set and meet short- and long-term goals that align with business objectives. In managing freelancers, this has long-been the case, and the approach to managing remote workers is very similar. 3.Looking at Positions AND Projects as Opportunities for Hiring companies in particular, this is a great way to expand business opportunities and contacts within a limited budget. This is sometimes seen as more of a perk for businesses than the freelancers themselves, but 77 percent of freelancers say they make the same or more money than they did before they started freelancing. And project- based work helps full-time employees create side opportunities for themselves. 27 percent of freelancers are so-called moonlighters- -that’s 14.3 million people with traditional full-time jobs who also do freelance work. This is yet another example of how 20th century work norms (staying in one job for your entire career) are being flipped, with most people now having multiple careers, with many different companies, during their professional lives. Both HR managers and individual professionals see the opportunities inherent in freelance and remote work. As the freelance or gig economy grows, HR professionals see opportunities to hire people for projects, rather than full positions. For freelancers, this means an increasing number of projects and gigs. And for companies, this means more flexibility to hire the best person for each project. For small 4.Making Companies More Productive The radical shift in the availability of easy-to- use technology has fueled the rise of remote work and freelancing. A Pew Research report found that 46 percent of workers who use online and digital tools say they feel more productive, and 39 percent say the Internet, e-mail and phones give them added flexibility in the hours they work. But I suspect that these numbers will only go up over the next five years as the tools used are chosen by the employees and workers themselves. For the future of work, HR needs to champion the expanded use BYOD (bring your own device) policies to assist workers in being productive however it makes sense for them. 31
  32. 32. 5.Rethinking Our Notion of the “Office” FlexJobs conducted a survey of 2,600 people searching for remote, freelance, and flexible work and found that 50 percent report that their home, not the office, is their location of choice to undertake important job-related assignments. 14 percent said they would choose the office, but only outside standard hours. Less than a quarter say the office during business hours is the best place to do important work! And why? The two biggest reasons people think they would be more productive working from home are the reduction of office politics and fewer interruptions from office colleagues. Companies need to find ways to make working outside the office possible for every worker. Like freelancers have known for years, remote workers have realized just how much more they can accomplish without frequent, attention-diminishing interruptions at the office. And smart HR managers know that to fuel a productivity boom at their company, workers need more control over where and how they work. 100 percent remotely. I firmly believe we are at a tipping point, with a rapid expansion of remote work and freelance opportunities right in front of us. HR professionals stand at the forefront of this tipping point, guiding companies towards the future of work. The Future of Work: Remote Workers and Freelancers When a big-name company like Aetna proudly displays on its Careers website that the first “Reason to Work at Aetna” is “easy commutes,” with the key stat that 43 percent of its employees already work from home, other companies pay attention. But the other thing they should pay attention to is the growing number of companies that operate Sara Sutton Fell Twitter: @sarasuttonfell LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/sarasuttonfell Sara Sutton Fell has long been passionate about helping people find jobs that make their lives better. She is currently the CEO and Founder of FlexJobs, the leading service for professional flexible job opportunities. During her career, Sutton Fell has been featured by CNN, BusinessWeek, Forbes, Fast Company and hundreds of media outlets. Sara believes that a modern workplace should address the needs of today’s workforce, and that utilizing workplace technology to support telecommuting and flexible work will achieve societal, environmental, and economic benefits for both employees and employers. She is also a member of the Great Workplace Cultures Think Tank and the Future of Work Community. Sara is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley. 32
  33. 33. The 50-Year Old Butterfly: 5 Critical Skills for the Workplace of the Future By Antoinette Forth, Co-Founder, Walkabout Collaborative LLC The word of the year is transformation, but don’t take my word for it. The proof is all around you. Amazon has over 10,000 books available on business transformation and over 40,000 more on personal transformation. Vocabulary in the workplace about transformation is changing daily. New buzzwords are being bandied about such as digital transformation, disruption, success thinking, purpose-driven, connected, collaboration, agile, social, and engagement, to name a few. Transformation is key in the workplace. People are no longer talking about the “Future Workplace” because the future is here and the time is now. I’ve spent the past seven years getting ready for the “future of work,” and have witnessed many of my peers struggle to find their place in it. I’ve come to realize the top five skills and actions that are needed to succeed in this new workplace. My advice is for everyone, but especially for people over the age of 50 (yes, those who have received their inaugural mailing from AARP). Are you prepared for this transformative environment? 1.Be Brave It’s not easy to walk into a room full of strangers, but it’s even harder when you are pitching a business start-up idea in 60 seconds while trying to win the support of a team of people. Therefore, it will take courage if you want to find success and build the life you want. If you are experiencing fear, anxiety, and doubt, what can you do to be brave? Don’t get wrapped up in all the things that can go wrong. Make a decision despite the fear. Shift your mindset and keep moving forward. There is no secret to courage. It’s simply a matter of just doing it. Courage will empower you and give you resilience. What to Do Today: To practice this skill, find your local Start-Up Grind community, get involved and pitch a business idea. 33
  34. 34. 2.Be Focused Before the digital revolution, generalists were in demand. In the future of work, success comes from concisely defining how your contribution will achieve business goals. Narrow your focus by thinking about how your skills and experience can come together to enhance the customer journey, transform tired business practices, or grow revenue. Be sure to work on what you are good at and enjoy doing. Think about it this way. If you come to a barn filled with a large array of horses of all descriptions and colors, it might take you hours to pick the right horse. However, you’ll need to pick one horse to ride or you’ll never get anywhere. The same holds true for your place in the world of work. What to Do Today: Google “customer centricity.” Review the first two pages of content and pick one that matches your experience and passion. For example: customer targeting and segmentation, defining value, or delivering an outstanding customer experience. You can do the same with “transforming business practices” and “growing revenue.” Look until you find what fits. Don’t worry, you can always change your mind. 3.Be Relevant Are you ready to excel at the work you’ve decided to do? Do you know how to use Twitter to connect with customers? Are you seen as a thought leader on LinkedIn? Do you know how to target an audience on Facebook? Becoming the go-to expert in your field and being social media savvy are essential. You do this by becoming a true lifelong learner. Set aside time to take classes and read books and articles to stay relevant in this fast changing world. With the Internet, access to knowledge is universal. There are no excuses for not keeping your skills “up-to- the-minute.” What to Do Today: Go to Lynda.com and take a course on writing for the Web. Udemy.com has Facebook marketing courses. Go to Coursera.org to learn Algorithms from Princeton University. 4.Be Productive You are the CEO of You! Just like when you moved from high school to college, in the “future of work,” you are responsible for your own individual performance. My top tip is to always get to meetings on time and keep meetings on track so they end on time. Demand the same from everyone with whom you work. A recent article in the Wall Street Journal* gave the results from two 2014 surveys showing 37% of meetings start and end late, by an average of nearly 15 minutes. That’s 30 minutes of wasted time for everyone who showed up on time. What to Do Today: Use the 30 minutes you save to set S.M.A.R.T. Goals, plan your day, review your progress, and learn techniques to increase your productivity. To quote Peter Bregman, “Never before has it been so important to be intentional about our time and say no to distraction.” Peter offers a great formula at his website http:// peterbregman.com/18-minutes/ with free downloadable checklists and templates. 34
  35. 35. 5.Be Connected Your transformation to an in-demand expert in your field will be complete when you are masterfully connected both in person and via electronic networking. Make sure that you are of service, give as well as you take, and protect and nurture your network. Networking is about making connections. You can do this by coordinating the uncoordinated and connecting two otherwise unconnected ideas and people together. Learn to make small talk, establish rapport, and then ask the best questions. Be a good listener and see how you might be able to help each person you meet. What to Do Today: Consult the networking experts. In her book “How to be a Power Connector: the 5-50-100 Rule for Turning Your Business Network into Profits,” author Judy Robinett offers a great formula on how many people you can effectively manage in your ‘active’ network. You might have guessed the number is 155, but Judy will teach you where those people can be found. You may be over 50, but you don’t have to be over-the-hill and set out to pasture. These 5 transformative skills will help you be ready to BE IN-DEMAND in the future workplace. Get started today for a better tomorrow. *WSJ, July 7, 2015, “Don’t Be the Office Sched- ule-Wrecker” by Sue Shellenbarger http://www.wsj.com/articles/dont-be-the-office- schedule-wrecker-1436290208 Antoinette Forth Co-founder of Walkabout Collaborative LLC Twitter: @Anton4th and @WalkaboutCo LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/antonforth Antoinette Forth, entrepreneur, mentor and strategic advisor, is the co-founder of Walkabout Collaborative LLC a private talent cloud for executive independent workers and management consulting firm preparing mid-size companies to scale. Determined to remain on the cutting-edge and refusing to accept the status quo, Antoinette thrives on challenges that focus on process improvement, problem-solving and finding solutions for underserved market segments. As the President and COO, Antoinette helps independent executive contingent workers and management consultants navigate the complexities of the future of work. Learn more about her company at walkaboutco. com. 35
  36. 36. It’s Time To Rethink The Employee Employer Relationship By Andy Jankowski, Founder and Managing Director, Enterprise Strategies Enabling technologies and fundamental changes in social constructs are rapidly impacting the relationships between employees and employers. Employers are realizing the necessity of having employees as customers and brand advocates, as well as the reality that no one really has to work for them. Employees are experiencing the game changing impacts of a world gone social. Today’s employees have a voice, a brand, and a multitude of choices of where and how they work — both inside and outside of their companies. Employers and employees alike must rethink their relationship with each other and the traditional mindsets, tools, processes and policies they’ve used to facilitate work. What do employers stand to gain by rethinking their relationship with employees? An exponential increase in marketing reach, authenticity and effectiveness, for one. While only 15% of people trust recommendations from brands, 84% trust recommendations from people they know.1 Employee advocacy programs at IBM2 and elsewhere are bringing material results and the focus on leveraging employees’ identities is transcending more than just sales and marketing. By engaging and leveraging the personalities, knowledge and relationships of employees, companies are also improving talent acquisition and retention costs, timing and efficiencies. In a survey by The Undercover Recruiter, 67% of employers and recruiters said the recruiting process was shorter, and 51% said it was less to expensive to recruit via referrals.3 Finally, the impact of this new relationship with employees is bolstering company performance and customer satisfaction. Gallup researchers studied the differences in performance between engaged and actively disengaged work units. The findings? Work units in the top quartile in employee engagement outperformed bottom-quartile units by 10% on customer ratings, 22% in profitability, and 21% in productivity.4 Moreover, Gallup’s research also showed that companies with engaged workforces have higher earnings per share (EPS), and that they have recovered from the 2008 recession at a faster rate. In one study, Gallup examined 49 publicly traded companies with EPS data available from 2008-2012. Companies with an average of 9.3 engaged employees for every actively disengaged employee in 2010-2011 experienced 147% higher EPS compared with their competition in 2011-2012. In contrast, 36
  37. 37. companies with an average of 2.6 engaged employees for every actively disengaged employee experienced 2% lower EPS compared with their competition during that same time period. How is employee engagement contributing to these financial results? Some suggest there is both correlation and causation between engaged employees and customer service. Research compiled by, Kevin Kruse, author of Employee Engagement 2.0, cites companies with high employee engagement scores had twice the customer loyalty (repeat purchases, recommendations to friends) than companies with average employee engagement levels.5 Taken in whole, these data points paint a pretty clear picture for employers. There is a significant return on investing in your company’s relationship with its employees. So do employees themselves stand to gain? To fully understand the benefit to employees, we have to look at how the social construct of “work” has evolved in recent years. Social constructs are simply our jointly constructed understandings of the world. Society’s view of work has changed and continues to do so. A new millennium quest for work life balance has morphed into a desire to blend work and life in a way that enables us to direct our time and energy to things that are fulfilling. After years of perceived, and in some cases actual, corporate suppression, social media has enabled us to experiment with self-expression in a business setting. Many employees now believe that work should allow us to be our authentic self, and in so being provides maximum value to our companies. Companies are realizing this too, but unfortunately, many are ill-equipped to make these changes. Employers must adapt. The following are just a few of the items holding back companies from embracing and realizing the full potential of this new type of employee employer relationship 1. 2. Company Culture Corporate Policy Pick a problem inside of a corporation, and it can generally be tied back to corporate culture. If our personality is how we act when no one is looking, then corporate culture is how we make decisions when no one is directing. For employees to realize their full potential inside of an organization they must feel safe and supported in doing so. Company culture needs to be one of acceptance and support. Culture is a precursor to a better employee employer relationship, but policy is what makes this new relationship possible. Why do some companies limit an employee’s use of social media? Why in some companies is the Marketing team the only group of employees trusted with communicating the arrival of new products and services? These are just a few examples, but the concept is much more broad and far reaching. For employees to provide employers the benefits of their identity, artificially limiting policies should be done away with and new more progressive policies need to be put in place. 37
  38. 38. 3. 4. Legacy Technology Employment Contracts Technology is not the solution, but it is the enabler that will make it possible for employees and companies alike to benefit from a new working relationship. We are already starting to see examples of enabling technology in platforms that allow for structured and monitored employee- driven internal and external social media communication. Legacy technology is a sticking point for many companies, and is a very expensive one to address. Companies need to view this investment as simply a cost of doing business. If they don’t, they may find themselves out of business. Companies must view employees as living beings that deserve, require and thrive in an environment of mutuality. That cannot happen unless we agree on new “rules of engagement”. The days of one-sided non- competes are limited. So too is the concept of an organization owning all of an employee’s thoughts during their time of employment. Both of these issues cannot be addressed unless we change the way we think about employment contracts. Mutuality requires mutual respect. Employment agreements of the future will need to make allowances for alternative commercial relationships, intellectual property rights and the legal freedoms needed for employees and employers to build their brands and businesses together. So where do these shifts leave us? There is no one right answer. The good news is that some forward thinking companies and employees have already begun this journey. These concepts, and the stories of employees and employers that are starting to embrace them, are the basis for my forthcoming book: BYO(I)dentity: The Future of the Employee and Employer Relationship. To learn more, or have your story told, come join the discussion at www.byoidentity.com. 1 5 Stats That Prove Employee Advocacy is Crucial http://wersm.com/5-stats-that-prove- employee-advocacy-is-crucial/#ixzz3i8m6fl00 2 How IBM Moved From Chasing References to Attracting Advocates http://centerforcustomerengagement.com/ how-ibm-moved-from-chasing-references-to- attracting-advocates/ 3 http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/ infographic-employee-referrals-hire/ 4 http://www.gallup.com/ businessjournal/163130/employee-engagement- drives-growth.aspx 5 http://www.kevinkruse.com/employee- engagement-research-master-list-of-29-studies/ References Andy Jankowski is the Founder and Managing Director of Enterprise Strategies, a consultancy committed to Delivering the Future of WorkSM through practical digital strategies and adoption programs. Recent Enterprise Strategies’ clients include AIG, Aon, Marsh Inc., Allianz Global Assistance, XL Group, The Laclede Group, Indianapolis Power & Light and The Student Success Network among others. He has written for, and been written about in, Forbes and The Huffington Post. He is a PIVOT Advisory Board Member and a member of the Future of Work Community Andy Jankowski Twitter: @AndyJankowski | @WorkingEvolved LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/andyjankowski 38
  39. 39. How do we prepare ourselves for the road that lies before us? As we look ahead and prepare for the journey to 2020, it’s difficult to assess where businesses will be in the next five years. As a GenerationXer raised by dot. com boomers in Silicon Valley and myself, working in the technology industry for the last 20 years, I cannot even fathom where our technological advancements will lead us. Each analyst has their own prediction of how such emerging Internet trends are shaping how individuals communicate, share ideas, are connected and are able to collaborate with one another across the world. We are already seeing a world that speaks in 140 characters or less; a world that cannot wait two days for a package to be delivered; an economy that can be shared; and a business that can be destroyed at the click of an app delete. Though we cannot predict the future of technology, we can prepare ourselves for the future of work by understanding how to communicate and collaborate in unison with the next generation of workers, the Millennials. By 2020, 70% of the U.S. workforce will be comprised of Millennials. Understand that being prepared for the future of work is being prepared to speak ‘millennial’. Your success depends on understanding this highly connected and digitally native generation. I currently lead a team of Millennials and have quickly learned that it is not I who teach them, but rather, they are the ones that teach me to be a better me. Members of the Boomers and Millennial generations will soon be equals in a world with no barriers or seniority divides. Boomers and Millennials will all be working symbiotically in a virtual workspace. The future of work (yours, mine, everyone’s) is taking shape before our eyes: work is being commoditized; work is being done from a computer; interactions are taking place within a virtual space; relationships and business deals are occurring via social connectivity or in an app. Instead of trying to control how Millennial interact, it is time to let go of what your current understanding of Millennials are and how they communicate, and instead, take the time to listen and learn from them. You are responsible for where the world of work is headed because your contribution in mentoring Millennials, the future CEOs of this world, will impact and shape the future. Their minds cannot be underestimated, their ideas cannot be stifled and understanding what drives them is how we can take control of where the future of work is headed. Mentoring for Success: 5 Ways to Help Millennials Prepare Your Business for The Future of Work By Tina Lai, Business Development Manager, Upwork 39
  40. 40. Mentoring Millennials I currently lead an A-Team of Millennials at a company that has already brought the workforce online. My team, let’s call them Upworkaholics, has found a perfect symbiotic balance of mutual respect and understanding where egos cannot hinder progress and complete transparency catapults the company on the upward track towards success. I have learned to be quite fluent in speaking ‘Millennial’ to translate their language into business success. In my quest to become a revered woman in technology, bridge the Boomer-Millennial divide, speak on the Future of Work, be the hippest futurist on Earth, and climb the socio-corporate ladder, I have found that understanding how to empower Millennials will actually be the omnipotent force behind the future success of companies looking to stay relevant, agile and drive significant business impact for the future of work. I come in to work every day grateful that I have this team of twenty-something-year olds to teach me how to be a better me. Millennials are the best teachers in the world. You just have to listen. Here is what I’ve learned so far. How To Become Their Role Model, Mentor, Advisor and Friend 1. 2. Listen. Really listen with intent. Give instant feedback Millennials have so much respect for those that have come before them. I never had a mentor in my twenties but if I had, I would have gone a lot further in my career by now. I had to learn everything on my own. I am privileged with the opportunity to transfer my knowledge and experience to my team who is eager to learn and hungry for success. Give them a chance to shine. My team utilizes SCRUM methodology, but with a sales-twist. We have our agile board at the office that shows where each team member stands in terms of achieving their quarterly goals. Our “Need to Schedule,” “Scheduling” and “Scheduled” meetings bring the competitive nature out of them as well. We hold Daily 10 Minute Stand-ups where we recap the day to say what our “Highlights” 40
  41. 41. 3. 4. 5. Practice transparency Keep it simple Have fun! Collaboratively creating clear plans for upward mobility and career growth is key. Millennials over-analyze, over-think, over-achieve, and aspire for it all. Just remember how you were when you were 21 years old. Always celebrate the small wins. We celebrate each other’s little wins like, “we didn’t get hung up on today, hooray!” It’s just important to have fun and bring out the best in each other. If your team member is failing to hit his or her quotas or not working together towards team goals and reaching for the stars there is no one else to look to but yourself as a manager. Millennials are also socially conscious. They volunteer their time often and remember to be grateful. They respect Earth. They are incubators of new ideas and thoughts. Remember to listen. Millennials work hard and set expectations to never show their weakness. They do not fathom the possibility of failure. It’s these qualities that make them so valuable. The Millennial generation has a beautiful, confident aura that makes them magnetic, powerful, teachable, and the most valuable asset you have at your company. As the Millennial generation grows, we all grow. We will be forced to learn more about them. Those that understand and communicate well with Millennials will grow to new positions, and experience the career success you are looking for! Understanding Millennials is just the first step to bridging the generational gap. It’s important to ask yourself how you have mentored Millennials for success; what makes them so dynamic and amazingly disruptive in the workplace, and how you can harness their energy to build a better workplace for the future of work. were and what our “Lowlights” were; and how to fix each others “Lowlights” so that they turn into “Highlights.” We fix issues immediately as they arise so they do not fester. Tina Lai is a leader in the next generation of work helping drive the shift from traditional work models to the on-demand workforce. Tina’s inspiration comes from the opportunity to help empower the world’s global workforce through technology, especially those in 3rd world countries with less opportunity. Tina has over 20 years of experience in sales and business development with Silicon Valley based start-ups. Tina Lai Twitter: @upworkaholic LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/upworkaholic 41
  42. 42. At ATB we believe that people have a right to great leadership and leaders have a responsibility to be GREAT... not perfect. What does it mean to be a great leader at ATB? There is a mountain range of literature and research on this topic. To sort through it all and personalize it for our company, we’ve defined great leadership with intention through what we call our All In Leadership Pledge. This framework is intended to guide our leadership development system, including but not limited to leadership succession. The punch line: The more you live and practice through the lens of our leadership pledge, the more successful you will be. Getting Extraordinary Results If you’re going to be a leader at ATB, you must demonstrate that you are capable of three non-negotiable outcomes. You must show that you can consistently deliver great results, develop others and collaborate through building strong relationships. Essentially, people are lined up to work for you because they know where you’re going, you’re intentionally clear, consistent and authentic in applying core values, you consistently get things done, and ideally, you’re fun to work with! Are you an All In Leader? By Lorne Rubis, Chief People Officer, ATB Financial 42
  43. 43. How To Get There At ATB, our Story or purpose provides an umbrella for why we jump out of bed in the morning. We know that meaningful purpose in providing material value to people is essential for sustainable profitable growth. We have also been very specific in describing our expected leadership behaviour attributes and absolute core values... what we call our ATBs. Attributes: Translator – Understand and make meaning Connector – Connect with care to others Hungry – Passionately strive for excellence Collaborator – Engage with others to achieve a common goal Agile – Adapt to change and take action Catalyst – Make things happen Creator – Create value Explorer – Find a new way forward Synthesizer – Find simplicity and grounding within complexity The ATBs (values): #1 Deliver WOW to customers and each other every chance you get #2 Continuously seek ways to make banking work FOR people #3 Think yes first #4 Be personally and fiercely accountable #5 Find a way to get things done #6 Be confident and humble #7 Trust and expect the same from others #8 Do the right thing #9 Think big and make it happen #10 Have fun every day Additionally, we have been very specific in describing the practices we expect leaders to follow. At minimum, we want leaders to practice and apply the practice of leadership by ensuring the following with their collective group AND each individual: Practices 1. I set a vivid and compelling vision on where we are going 2. I set clear and inspiring expectations for performance 3. I connect, care and coach in-the-moment and in one-on-ones 4. I give feedback generously, asking for and receiving it in return 5. I drive continuous learning to accelerate growth and agility 6. I actively notice and recognize others and celebrate results 43
  44. 44. All In Leadership! The entire All In Leadership Pledge is outlined as a system as outlined in the ATB Leaders ALL IN. If you want to accelerate and continue as a leader at ATB, you are expected to continuously develop and evaluate yourself according to this framework. If you can’t or won’t, it’s best to develop your career elsewhere. Why? People deserve great leaders and leaders are responsible to be GREAT (not perfect). Lorne Rubis @LorneRubis https://www.linkedin.com/pub/lorne-rubis/0/b28/74a As Chief People Officer, Lorne Rubis is responsible for leading change within ATB as the organization sets out to be number one in local markets, become THE place to work. He has extended his experiences, ideas and energy within ATB by elevating and transforming Human Resources into what is now People & Culture. Lorne has held senior leadership roles in a number of tech companies in the United States a stint with the Los Angeles Kings. Prior to joining ATB, Lorne was the president and chief executive officer of Ryzex, a privately-held, international technology company. He writes frequently about getting the most out of work and life situations through a focus on Respect, Abundance and Accountability – the three tenants of The Character Triangle. 44
  45. 45. You Aren’t Very Good at Interviewing By John Sigmon, CHRO, AARP I have a very simple hiring philosophy- How many times in your career have you suffered through an interview and been presented with exhausting questions such as “where do you see yourself in five years?” or “what is your greatest strength/weakness?” I recall an interview I had with a prestigious investment- banking firm and was asked “how many pencils do you think will fit into this office?” I’ve never been quite certain the purpose of that inquiry, perhaps it was to make the interviewer feel powerful or clever. There is a significant body of data to suggest that the basic job interview is an ineffective method to select the best candidate. Some of this is due to what is known widely as confirmation bias. Based on primitive instincts we assess our fellow humans quickly. When we all lived on the plains this rapid assessment might make the difference between life and death. In modern society the impact is subtler. If we don’t like someone’s handshake, how he or she dresses, his or her appearance, the interview is basically over. The interviewer proceeds to continually look for reasons to reject you in order to confirm the basic impression. Conversely, if the handshake is firm (but not too firm), the individual is tall and attractive, and demonstrates a degree of confidence, the interviewer is likely to fall victim to the Halo effect. Again, the interview is basically over. This time the interviewer is continually looking for reasons to accept you as a top This dangerous path is particularly true with unstructured interviews, which surprisingly remain commonplace. It unfolds like this- a candidate who appears reserved or maybe introverted might be asked if they are “comfortable in a large group setting”. A candidate for the same role who presents as outgoing, extroverted and confident might be asked is they have experience “leading large teams.” This is the confirmation bias at work. Other factors that influence the hiring decision include height, attractiveness, and the sound of someone’s voice. There is also evidence to suggest that the order in which a candidate is interviewed has an influence on hiring. Interviewers assess candidates not simply on the merits of their particular interview performance, but they also take into account the rating of candidates they have already interviewed. So if an interviewer has already awarded several high ratings they are less likely to award high ratings later in the interview cycle. All of this evidence paints a dismal picture of the interviewing process. Luckily, science points to several variations on the classic interview that can increase the odds of selecting the ideal   Find your own candidates- relationship recruiting Rigorously assess candidates- structured interviewing, work samples, testing Hire at the 95th percentile- never settle for less than the best Effectively On-Board- reduce time to productivity 45
  46. 46. candidate. A meta-analysis covering nearly a century of research uncovered some interesting findings on how effective various assessments are in predicting employee performance.* There are common practices when candidates are screened/ interviewed for positions. See if any of these sound familiar: Work sample tests Structured interviews These two assessment methods combined account for 55% of an employee’s performance. Why don’t more employers use structured interviews or work samples/testing? Hiring managers often claim structured interviewing is time consuming and the questions are hard to develop. HR staff are afraid to use work samples/testing because they have limited experience and they are risk averse. Let’s do some math. Let’s say you and your team of 2 staff spend a collective 40 hours developing structured interview questions based on the competencies you are seeking in a new employee. At a total compensation rate of $200,000 per year, those 40 hours have cost $3,846. Let’s further assume you need to train 3 interview panel members, taking another collective 40 hours (your staff time and the time of the panel members) for an additional $3,846. Let’s further assume you have in place a work sample or testing instrument that has been vetted and is job relevant. The cost to administer that test by a third party is approximately $2500. This represents an incremental cost to your hiring process. The alternative is sticking to a more traditional method and taking your chances. If you misjudge, the cost of sending your new hire to training will be significantly more expensive and if you count in the opportunity cost of having an employee in training, the possibility of HR time intervening and working with the manager (developing performance improvement plans) or hiring a coach for the employee you can quickly conclude it is more cost effective to hire at the 95th percentile through a structured interview process. It is virtually impossible to take an average performer and through training turn, them into a corporate star. The future of work is dependent upon excellence in hiring practices. Let’s be honest, this is hard. It is hard work to turn around an organizational construct around talent, to get hiring managers on board, to work with legal to make sure assessments are sound, to deal with the “just give me someone who can answer the phones” mentality. Do you want to hire an average performer you think may perform and do well, give them some training and counseling if they don’t; all the while hoping they add value soon? Or, would you rather adopt a practice of hiring that is evidence based, and provides candidates at the 95th percentile, who can add value right away? I thought so. 46
  47. 47. *Frank L. Schmidt and John E. Hunter, “The Validity and Utility of Selection Methods in Personnel Psychology: Practical and Theoretical Implications of 85 Years of Research Findings,” Psychological Bulletin 124, no. 2 (1998) John Sigmon @YourHRideas www.linkedin.com/in/johnwsigmon John Sigmon has nearly 20 years of human resources leadership with a focus on strategic innovation and business improvement within for-profit, not-for-profit, and public sector organizations. He has proven successes in effectively integrating human resources into the organizational fabric. He currently leads enterprise HR with expertise that extends beyond human resources and demonstrates an understanding of the entire enterprise. He cultivates relationships by providing a nimble HR platform capable of meeting AARP’s dynamic needs. 47 Reference
  48. 48. Today’s Consumer-WorkersTM by Wendy Smith, NCR, Head of New Employee Experiences New workers have emerged in today’s work- force that are having a significant impact on HR professionals and how we develop HR programs. These new Consumer-WorkersTM, a term I’ve coined with my colleague Kevin Finke, founder of Experience Willow, are the product of the changing world around us. They’re guided by new generational mindsets and evolving behaviors that have emerged over time as a result of influences like social media, mobile capabilities, and other techno- logical advances. Consumer-Workers no longer approach work the way past generations have. There are millions of them across the globe, and if you want to be successful employers, you need to pay attention to why and how they want to work. Yesterday’s workers did not consider themselves to be customers of the business- es that employed them. They were satisfied working for decent paychecks, while being treated with acceptable levels of fairness and respect. The “contract” was very basic – “We do the work you need us to do, and you pay us fairly for it.” In contrast, Consumer-Work- ers actually see themselves as customers of your employer brands, and they have ongo- ing expectations that start at recruitment and continue through their entire employment journey. When they’re not happy at work, they start shopping elsewhere for new com- panies. Since consumer behaviors are also rapidly evolving due to similar influences like tech- nology and social media, Consumer-Workers don’t approach employer brand consumption with traditional consumer mindsets, but rath- er as consumers of today. The chart below demonstrates the shift in how they approach the consumption of products and services and how that relates to their consumption of employer brands: 48
  49. 49. As you can see, Consumer-Workers are looking for very personalized workplace experiences that are relevant to the things they care most about. They want to make a difference and feel like they’re part of organizations they identify with – that share their goals and values. It’s not just about pay any more; it’s about the total employee value proposition. And, as with products and services today, there is little to no brand loyalty. They will continue to shop your employer brands only as long as you continue to meet their needs by creating relevant, engaging work experiences that connect with them personally. Given this dramatic shift in the relationship of employees and employers, we must take new approaches in HR to be able to appeal to Consumer-Workers. Looking through the lens of employees as customers of your employer brands, HR professionals must begin to evolve into expert marketers and experience makers (or at the very least partner with those people who are) to enable the development of cohesive and genuinely meaningful end-to-end workplace experiences that address the entire employee lifecycle. Until HR builds these skill sets within the HR organization, it is essential to partner closely with other teams like Marketing and Customer Experience (CX) organizations. They have been creating quality brand experiences for external customers for decades. It’s time to tap into their knowledge and skills to create these same exceptional experiences for your internal customers – your employees.In addition to creating close partnerships with marketers and experience builders, HR must also utilize all the technologies and tools available to create work environments that will attract top-notch talent and encourage sustainable engagement with their organizations. One critical strategy for success is to leverage SMAC (Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud) solutions. As previously seen, many Consumer-Worker attitudes and preferences have actually been influenced by SMAC, and the experiences they have received as consumers of products and services resulting from SMAC. Consumer-Workers want to connect socially with their peers – to share experiences, learn from others, and engage in communities that are relevant to them. They expect social tools to be readily available inside and outside of work. Many are even using social sites during job hunting – so, it’s imperative to ensure your companies have robust social recruiting strategies in place. Mobile also plays a huge role in Consumer- Worker expectations. In their non-work worlds, they’re accustomed to free or cheap apps that help them get things done easier. Now they’re beginning to ask, “If it’s so easy to create an app that can help us get our banking done quickly and order products online, why can’t our companies create apps that will help make work easier for us? Why can’t they give us easy-to-use apps to submit expenses and log our time? And if investment firms can provide apps that can guide amateur investors through the complicated process of investing effectively, then why can’t our workplaces offer apps that will help me learn and grow in my particular role to improve my skills?” Workers have accepted that most work is no longer 9-to-5 and understand the need to be “on call” virtually. But as part of the compromise to sacrifice what used to be a distinct separation between work and leisure 49
  50. 50. time, Consumer-Workers expect flexibility and mobile tools to enable a more seamless, blended integration between work and life. They want to be able to send off the emails their bosses are waiting on while watching their child’s soccer game on Saturday. Or finish up the last touches on the reports that are due while in the car on the way to a movie. The ability to work wherever and however one chooses is fundamental to the needs of Consumer-Workers. HR practitioners must figure out how to offer not only flexible work policies, but also mobile and cloud-based tools that enable effective work in these environments. In conclusion, new Consumer-Workers have arrived and are changing how we all feel about work and employee experiences. HR professionals must evolve their approach to treat employees as customers of their employer brands. And in such, they must utilize the skills and tools traditionally used by marketing and CX experts to create meaningful, tailored experiences that will delight their customers, their employees, as well as their potential customers, their candidates. This new approach will help attract great talent and build strong engagement with today’s Consumer-Workers. Wendy Smith is a self-proclaimed lifelong learner, and there’s nothing she’s more passionate about than challenging old paradigms, especially when it means helping others to learn, grow and achieve their personal goals and dreams. At NCR, she focuses on creating the most exceptional employee experiences that win over the hearts and minds of her fellow NCR employees— or people she calls iNCRedibles, a name created during the design and development of NCR FIRST STEPS, the newly launched global onboarding program she has directed from scratch. Wendy has been at NCR for 15 years, and today touts experience in HRIS, CI/CX, HR shared Services, and Global Learning. Most recently, she was named Director of New Employee Experiences. Her team oversees both the candidate and new hire experiences for more than 5,000 global employees annually. Wendy was named a 2015 Workforce Gamechanger which recognizes the next generation of innovative, dynamic leaders to watch in human resources and workplace management. Wendy Smith Twitter: @WendyMorph LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/wendy-smith/4/b22/b5a 50

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