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The Green Beret Guide for Success

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The Green Beret Guide for Success

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Special Operations Forces are the most elite and flexible units in the world. Green Berets, Navy SEALs, Rangers, Nightstalkers, Special Operations Wing: these are the warriors trained to perform beyond the ordinary and to make the impossible, possible. The author, a former Green Beret, takes you inside their shadowy world, laying out their history and lineage.

Special Operations Forces are the most elite and flexible units in the world. Green Berets, Navy SEALs, Rangers, Nightstalkers, Special Operations Wing: these are the warriors trained to perform beyond the ordinary and to make the impossible, possible. The author, a former Green Beret, takes you inside their shadowy world, laying out their history and lineage.

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The Green Beret Guide for Success

  1. 1. "Bob Mayer gives us a unique and valuable window into the shadowy world of our country's elite fighting forces and how you can apply many of the concepts and tactics they use for success in your own life and organization." Jack Canfield: Co-creator Chicken Soup for the Soul and The Success Principles
  2. 2. “In war everything is simple, but even the simple is difficult.” Carl von Clausewitz.
  3. 3. Why use Green Beret Strategies for your team? In the modern world, the need for Special Operations Tactics has spread beyond the world of the military: the world is moving faster, change occurs constantly, and the goals that need to be achieved often change from mission to mission. Special Forces A-Teams are not just ‘better’ teams, they dare to be different. Do you want to take the challenge?
  4. 4. The Circle of Success
  5. 5. Overview of the Program: WINS 1. WHAT specifically do you want to achieve? 2. WHY do you want to achieve these particular goals? 3. WHERE will sustained change occur?
  6. 6. Overview of the Program: WHO 4. Understand CHARACTER. 5. What is CHANGE, and how do you accomplish it? 6. How do you build the COURAGE to change?
  7. 7. Overview of the Program: DARES 7. COMMUNICATE your change to the world. 8. Take COMMAND of your change. 9. COMPLETE the Circle of Success and change.
  8. 8. Two Key Experiences Part of the transition from an Army focused on conventional warfare in the Cold War to Special Operations in the War on Terror (Lebanon, Mogadishu, JFK Special Warfare Center, Gulf Wars, Westcom Special Ops, Afghanistan) On the front edge of the transition from traditional publishing to digital publishing (from 4 of Big 6 NY publishers to own publishing company and Amazon); from zero to seven figures in eighteen months
  9. 9. Self-Confidence: Low Confidence High Confidence Hiding/Ignoring mistakes Admitting mistakes & Learning from them Doing what others think you should Doing what you know is right Letting fear dictate you actions Using courage to overcome fear Staying in status quo (misery) Taking risks & changing, despite difficulty Letting others take charge Taking charge Letting each day happen Having goals, plan, and on a path every day
  10. 10. Area 1: WINS
  11. 11. “Creativity without strategy, or strategy without creativity, is unlikely to get either parties the results they are anticipating.” Lincoln Davies
  12. 12. Goal. Goal: The team (members) state clearly defined goals in one sentence, and understand why they are trying to achieve these goals and align the hierarchy of goals.
  13. 13. Goal Problems. Team members don’t clearly understand what the team is to achieve. Team members don’t understand their own jobs and how it relates to the team goal. Team morale is low because initiative and expertise aren’t valued. Team is working in conflict with its environment. The team is not designed correctly to achieve the goal.
  14. 14. Goals. Goals are future oriented. The normal team spends its time and energy reacting. The elite (eminent) team spends its time and energy acting.
  15. 15. Team Goal Setting, Idea Defining “If you don’t know where you are going, you are liable to end up somewhere else.” Casey Stengel
  16. 16. Step 1: WHAT do you want to achieve?
  17. 17. The One Sentence Goal & Hiearchy-- The Solutions. State your team primary goal in one sentence of 25 words or less. Write it down. Know how many goals your team has. Know how many goals you have. Clearly know your mission goals. Align the hierarchy of goals.
  18. 18. Do You Actually Need One Sentence? For any action: Yes. One key verb, an action verb. It should result in an external, visible, outcome.
  19. 19. Goals Should Be Positive and Active. The verb of your goal sentence should be a positive one. It should be an active, not a reactive one. When we get to WHO, you will see most personal goals tend to be negative and reactive.
  20. 20. Bad Goals. “I don’t want to get my head knocked off.” “We don’t want to lose the game.” “I don’t want to be over-weight.” “We don’t want to go bankrupt” “We want to stay in business.”
  21. 21. Focusing Your Goals. When you write your one sentence down, check to see what the subject of the sentence is: A person? The consumer? The company? The team? You? Revenue? The product? Check to see what the verb is. Positive or negative? Action or re-action verb?
  22. 22. How To Get One Sentence: What do we want to do? Why do we want to do it? Why should anyone else want to do it? (History & Research) What is the most important thing your team wants to achieve? How will your team know when it has achieved its goal? What will have happened? The one sentence is the What, not the How.
  23. 23. Team Goals Help: Your team was founded for? The most important part of your team is? Your primary product is? (Fastener systems, belt cleaners & plows, belt trackers, load-point products, belt maintenance tools, belt splicing, transfer chutes, pulley lagging, belt cleats, composite rollers) Your brand is? How do you know when your team’s goal has been accomplished?
  24. 24. The Hierarchy of Goals “Success demands singleness of purpose.” Vince Lombardi.
  25. 25. The Hierarchy of Goals Organization Goal. (Strategic) Team Goal. Mission goal. (Tactical) Individual goal. Task goal.
  26. 26. Organizational Goal “Everyone will now be mobilized and all boys old enough to carry a spear will be sent to Addis Abada. Married men will bring their wives to carry food and cook. Those without wives will take any woman without a husband. Women with small babies need not go. The blind, those who cannot carry a spear are exempted. Anyone found at home after receipt of this order will be hanged.” Haille Selassie in 1939.
  27. 27. Organizational Goal Special Forces will be prepared to conduct the six SOF missions of Unconventional Warfare, Direct Action, Strategic Reconnaissance, Foreign Internal Defense, Counter-Terrorism, and Coalition Warfare Support. The over-arcing goal of why the organization exists. Why it was founded.
  28. 28. Team Goal ODA 055 will be prepared to conduct all SOF missions with an emphasis on Strategic Reconnaissance with maritime operations capability. Narrows down the Organizational Goal.
  29. 29. Mission Goal ODA 055 will infiltrate Operational Area Claw to conduct Strategic Reconnaissance along the designated sector of trails, reporting designated HV targets for fourteen days. Applies the Team Goal to a specific mission.
  30. 30. Individual Goal The Senior Communications Sergeant will maintain a secure link with higher headquarters. (organization/job)
  31. 31. Individual Goal for Mission The Senior Communications Sergeant will immediately report any HV target to higher headquarters.
  32. 32. The Hierarchy of Goals Must Be Aligned This is everyone’s responsibility, but particularly the leader’s. If goals are not aligned, there is inherent conflict and wasted time and energy. Communication is key to alignment.
  33. 33. The Problem With Negative Goals: Reduces initiative. Reduces morale. They can never be achieved, thus they are un-ending.
  34. 34. Write down your personal goal. Write down your current mission goal. Write down your team goal.
  35. 35. DO THEY ALIGN?
  36. 36. Step 2: WHY do you want to achieve your what?
  37. 37. “He who has a why to live can bear with almost any how.” Nietzsche
  38. 38. Intent-- The Problem. Team morale is low because initiative and expertise aren’t valued.
  39. 39. Intent-- The Solutions. State intent to allow innovation. Give intent to increase morale. Give intent to allow team members to exercise their expertise.
  40. 40. INTENT You always have one, even if it is subconscious. Why do you want to achieve this goal? Intent can help you innovate and motivate. A goal is usually intellectual while intent is emotional. Intent must be able to overcome fear. We are doing X (goal) for reason Y (intent). Mission Statement (goal)- Commander’s Intent.
  41. 41. Examples of Bad Intents. “Because the boss said so. “So we don’t get fired.” “So we look busy.” Because we have nothing better to do.” “So we don’t go out of business.”
  42. 42. Intent. Gives a direction, but not specific instructions. Allows subordinates flexibility in deciding how to do things. Give parameters of the goal. Intent respects expertise.
  43. 43. Step 3: WHERE will this occur?
  44. 44. The Problem. The team is working in conflict with its environment. The team is not designed correctly to achieve the goal.
  45. 45. Area Study-- The Solutions. Conduct an Area Study to understand the team’s environment. Use the CARVER template to achieve desired short and long terms results.
  46. 46. Special Operations Tactic: Area Study You know your Goal: what your team needs to achieve. You know your Intent: why your teams needs to achieve that goal. Now you need to understand the environment in which you will be doing this and your affect on it and its affect on you. In essence, Area Study= Research. We would go into Isolation for this.
  47. 47. Special Operations Tactic: Isolation Locked up 24/7 in a secure compound for focus and security. Key is to make the time to do this before conducting actual planning. Front-load the work. Delegate responsibilities (have an SOP for this) It’s acting. Saves time and energy in the long run. Sometimes you can’t fix something that’s always moving.
  48. 48. Special Operations Tactic: Area Study Study your market. Who wants your product? How will you get your product to them? What will be your enabling factors? What will be your disabling factors?
  49. 49. Special Operations Tactic: Area Study Study completely the environment in which your team will be operating. ‘Walk the battlefield’: Little Big Horn. Study other teams like yours. Both the successes and particularly the failures.
  50. 50. Area Study Do it first hand. Second hand via: Study others who have done it. Area experts. HALO input (Amazon) History.
  51. 51. Build the Right Team for the Situation and Goal Break the goals down until you get to the individual level. What people are needed to accomplish those tasks? What people can accomplish those tasks and work on a team?
  52. 52. Example of a lack of Area Study Blood Lesson: Tarawa. 1943, Pacific Theater, the Gilberts, needed Air Base on Betio. Goal: Take Tarawa. Intent: Control the Air Base.
  53. 53. Tarawa: Japanese Commander: “A million men cannot take Tarawa in a hundred years.” American Commander: “We will destroy it. We will obliterate it.” ODA 055 Team Sergeant SOP: “Nothing is impossible to the man who doesn’t have to do it.”
  54. 54. Tarawa: 0215, 20 November 1943: Attack begins. No Area Study done. Landing craft went in. 500 yards from shore hit a submerged reef. Four waves of troops: twenty by three hundred feet foothold. 1,500 of 5,000 dead and wounded.
  55. 55. Tarawa: Lessons Learned AAR was conducted. New Type of Landing Craft Forerunners of Navy SEALs (UDT) founded to do: AREA STUDY.
  56. 56. Area Study: Avoid the Obvious Antietam and the Stone Bridge. General Burnside on south end of battlefield. Cross the creek and attack. Focused on the Stone Bridge.
  57. 57. Area II: WHO
  58. 58. Who: Goals Overview Goal: You must understand your CHARACTER and how it affects you in your job. You must understand CHANGE and how COURAGE can facilitate true change.
  59. 59. Character Problems. Lack of awareness of self. Lack of awareness of others. Both lead to conflict. Lack of awareness of the dangers & benefits of fear. Not understanding change takes three steps. Unwillingness to use Courage to succeed.
  60. 60. Character. Character is the essence of a person. Made up of both your strengths & weaknesses. Have to find your blind spot. You can’t ignore fear; you must plan for it.
  61. 61. Character. Most of what you do is habit. Kaizen= continual improvement. Change brings discomfort and then fear. The more you move into your Courage Zone, the larger your Comfort Zone will become.
  62. 62. Step Four: Understand your CHARACTER
  63. 63. Character. The combination of qualities or features that distinguishes one person from another. The Mission or the Men? How do you recognize character? Crisis shows true character. Before recognizing and understanding the character of others, you must under your own point of view.
  64. 64. People In Conflict Conflict is rooted in different motivations, even if people want the same thing. Three levels to motivation: inner, personal, universal. Fear is often a primary motivator. Often you must overcome fear, even if it isn’t your primary motivator.
  65. 65. Motivation Every person thinks every situation is about them. Everyone has a core motivation (pathological need). Victor Frankl called this the ‘One Thing.’ The motivation can be anything.
  66. 66. CHARACTER: Exercise Write down the last time you were doing something wrong and how you reacted to it?
  67. 67. Templates. Apply to yourself and others. But first have to understand yourself and your point of view. So you can understand the differences in people. Archetypes. Profiling. Myers-Briggs.
  68. 68. Archetypes-- Gender Differences Female Boss Seductress Spunky kid Free spirit Waif Librarian Crusader Nurturer Male Chief Bad boy Best friend Charmer Lost soul Professor Swashbuckler Warrior
  69. 69. Profiling FBI Behavioral Science Unit: John Douglas: MINDHUNTER-- tracking serial killers. But you can profile anyone. 99% of what we do is habit. Habit= behavior patterns. Examine the results and work back.
  70. 70. Profiling Key to understanding self and others is behavior patterns. Peeling away the layers. Helps with understanding the concept of change. Profile yourself— just list actions, then examine them. Who would act like this? Are they the right actions to achieve the desired goals? The contrarian.
  71. 71. Myers-Briggs Developed in 1943. Not a test, but an indicator, so there are no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ labels. Four areas, two possible orientations to each, equals 16 character ‘types’. However, the actual test in each area is a sliding scale.
  72. 72. AREA 1 BLOCK A BLOCK B Act first, think later? Feel deprived if cutoff from interacting with the outside world? Tend to be motivated by the outside world? Get energized by groups? Think first, then act? Require ‘private’ time to get energized? Tend to be internally motivated? Groups drain your energy?
  73. 73. AREA 2 BLOCK A BLOCK B Mentally live in the now? Use common sense for practical solutions? Your memory focuses on details and fact? Don’t like guessing? Mentally live in the future? Use imagination for innovative solutions? Your memory focuses on patterns and context? Comfortable with guessing?
  74. 74. AREA 3 BLOCK A BLOCK B Search for facts when making a decision? Notice work to be accomplished? Tend to provide an objective analysis? Believe conflict is a normal part of relationships with people? Focus on feelings when making a decision? Focus on people’s needs? Seek consensus and popular opinions? Dislike conflict and avoid it if at all possibe?
  75. 75. AREA 4 BLOCK A BLOCK B Plan details before taking action? Focus on tasks and complete them in order? Keep ahead of deadlines to avoid stress and work optimally? Set targets, dates and routines to manage your life? Are comfortable moving into action without a plan? Like to multitask and can mix work with play? Work best closer to deadlines? Avoid commitments that might interfere with your freedom and flexibility?
  76. 76. Results 1A= Extrovert (E) 2A= Sensing (S) 3A= Thinking (T) 4A= Judging (J) 1B= Introvert (I) 2B= iNtuition (N) 3B= Feeling (F) 4B= Perceiving (P)
  77. 77. Myers-Brigs Types INTP= Architect ENTP= Inventor INTJ= Scientist ENTJ= Field Marshall INFP= Questor ENFP= Journalist INFJ= Author ENJF= Pedagogue ESJF= Seller ISFJ= Convservator ESFP= Entertainer ISFP= Artist ESTJ= Administrator ISTJ= Trustee ESTP= Promoter ISTP= Artisan
  78. 78. Extroversion vs. Introversion This is how we view the world. Extroverts are social. Introverts are territorial. Extroverts prefer breadth and a wide variety of personal communications. Introverts prefer depth and one on one. Extroverts tend to be externally motivated. Introverts tend to be internally motivated. 75% Extroverts 25% Introverts.
  79. 79. Intuition vs. Sensation Innovative vs. Practical. This is how we think. This is the greatest source of misunderstanding between people. 25% Intuitive 75% Sensation
  80. 80. Thinking vs. Feeling The thinking part of our brain analyzes and decides in a detached manner. The feeling part of our brain analyzes and decides in an attached manner. Impersonal vs. personal. This is how we make decision and act. Logic vs. emotion. 50% Thinking 50% Feeling but . . . More men are Thinking and more women are Feeling.
  81. 81. Judging vs. Perceiving. Closure vs. Open-ended. This is how we approach our endeavors. Results or process? 50% Judging 50% Perceiving.
  82. 82. Myers-Brigs Types INTP= Architect ENTP= Inventor INTJ= Scientist ENTJ= Field Marshall INFP= Questor ENFP= Journalist INFJ= Author ENJF= Pedagogue ESJF= Seller ISFJ= Convservator ESFP= Entertainer ISFP= Artist ESTJ= Administrator ISTJ= Trustee ESTP= Promoter ISTP= Artisan
  83. 83. Right Brain: Left Brain: CLOCKWISE Uses Feelings Symbols & Images Present & Future Big Picture Oriented Imagination Rules Risk Taking COUNTER Uses Logic Words & Language Present & Past Detail Oriented Facts Rule Plays it Safe
  84. 84. Step 5: What is CHANGE and how do you do it?
  85. 85. If you aren’t where you want to be, you must change. Change isn’t just thinking differently, but the 1st step of change is to think differently. Make is externally imposed. Become is internally motivated. The successful become. Change. 87
  86. 86. Can people change? You want to show change, not just talk about it. Change requires three things to happen . . . Change. 88
  87. 87. Moment of Enlightenment Make a decision Implement Sustained Action What is Change? 89
  88. 88. What step of change do you believe you have the most trouble with? MOE? Decision? Sustained Action? 90
  89. 89. 91
  90. 90. 92
  91. 91. 93
  92. 92. Experience something never experienced before. Experience something you’ve experienced before, but it affects you differently than ever before. This is the classic ‘light bulb going on’. By itself, it is not change, just a momentary awareness. Denial often blocks MOEs. Anger stops MOEs when it is actually an Moment of Enlightenment 94
  93. 93. 95
  94. 94. Because of the Moment of Enlightenment, a decision is made. It is not necessarily a good decision. You then are either: Stuck with the decision (externally imposed change) or Stick with the decision (internally motivated change) By itself, a decision is not change, just a fleeting commitment. Bargaining can dilute a decision. Depression can cause you to give up on decision. Decision 96
  95. 95. 97
  96. 96. Take a piece of paper and make three columns. In left column write down a MOE you’ve had today. 98
  97. 97. Two types of decision making: Intuitive: emotional, fast, automatic, but slow-learning. Reasoning: emotionally neutral, slow, controlled and rule governed. Decision. 99
  98. 98. A bat and ball together cost $1.10. The bat cost a dollar more than the ball. How much does the ball cost? 100
  99. 99. Intuitive: .10 True answer: .05 Bat: $1.05 Ball .05 101
  100. 100. Flip a coin six times. Which is the more likely result: 1: HHHTTT 2: HTTHTH 102
  101. 101. Neither. If you picked the second, you’re doing the misconception of chance. 103
  102. 102. Let’s make a deal. 3 doors. Behind 1 is $1,000,000 Behind the other 2 is a goat You pick a door They reveal one of the other doors is a goat You are then asked: Do you want to change you choice? Do you? 104
  103. 103. Because of the decision, behavior is changed. The changed behavior is sustained long enough to become habit. In the military, this is called training. The 5% rule for external and internal sustained action. Sustained action leads to change. Sliding back on the five stages stops this. Acceptance is not easy-- your reality has changed. Sustained Action. 105
  104. 104. Take the piece of paper. In middle column write down a decision you need to make based on your MOE 106
  105. 105. Denial Anger Bargaining Depression Acceptance Emotional Stages of Change 108
  106. 106. How Do We Know When Someone Has Changed? We see it. They act differently.
  107. 107. The Five Percent Rule Is perseverance more important than talent? Statistically born out by: weight loss, AA, Black Belts, getting published, Death & Dying, etc.. Many people are wanna-be’s.
  108. 108. Learning Learn from any source. If you don’t like something, but it’s successful, study it. If it makes you angry, really focus on it. If you’re not where YOU want to be, YOU have to change.
  109. 109. Step 6: How do you build the COURAGE to change?
  110. 110. “Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” Anais Nin
  111. 111. CHARACTER: Exercise 23 In one word, record what you believe to be your greatest character trait.
  112. 112. What is COURAGE The state or quality of mind or spirit that enables one to face danger with self-possession, confidence, and resolution, The ability to do something that frightens one. Strength in the face of pain or grief.
  113. 113. Courage Expand your comfort zone into your courage zone. Courage is acting in the face of fear. Your strongest emotional defenses are around your greatest weaknesses. Often what we think is our strongest character strength is our
  114. 114. What Is Fear? It is a feeling of alarm or disquiet caused by the expectation of danger, pain, or the like. Heroism is taking action in the face of fear. Fear is an emotion. It often stems from uncertainty. It is often the primary motivator for people as we require base needs to be fulfilled first.
  115. 115. “Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little death that brings total oblivion. I must face my fear. I must allow it to pass over me and through me and where it has gone I must turn the inner eye. Only I will remain.” from Dune by Frank Herbert.
  116. 116. Fear-- The Problems. People tend to ignore fear as a factor. People tend to downplay the benefit of fear. People tend to ignore conflict as a factor. Most people try to solve conflict by either ignoring it or trying to change the other person.
  117. 117. Fear-- The Solutions. Fear must be factored into an organization and mission planning. The benefits of fear need to be understand and utilized, ie The Gift of Fear. Conflict must be addressed and the aspect fear plays in conflict focused on. Conflict resolution must be addressed in ways other than trying to change other people.
  118. 118. Keys to Overcoming Fear? Acknowledge it is exists. Define what you really fear, often the blind spot. Factor it in, both positively and negatively. Open and honest communication reduces anxiety and fear. Trust reduces anxiety and fear. Find your blind spots.
  119. 119. Honesty with self. The first step is to rip away the denial. Look at what you think is your greatest strength and turn it around. Most fear is subconscious-- you will likely need help finding the true root. Fear can become a self-fulfilling prophecy.
  120. 120. CHARACTER: Exercise 25 Think about the last time you wanted to do something you knew was right, but didn’t. Why?
  121. 121. Blind Spot Needs produce blind spots. Everyone has blind spots. Make sure you know yours. Strongest defenses are built around the blind spot. Therefore . . . Often the blind spot is the part of character thought to be the strongest. Denial defends blinds spot and justifies needs. Blind spots are the making of tragedy.
  122. 122. Trait Need Flaw Loyal Adventurous Altruistic Tolerant Decisive Realistic Competitive Idealistic To be trusted To have change To be loved To have no conflict To be in charge To be balanced To achieve goals To be the best Gullible Unreliable Submissive No conviction Impetuous Outer control Overlook cost Naive
  123. 123. Expand your comfort zone by venturing into your courage zone. Every day try to do something that you dislike doing, but need to do. Action is the only way to grow courage. If you’re introverted, talk to a stranger every day. If you’re a practical person, do something intuitive every day. Do the opposite of your Myers-Briggs character.
  124. 124. Loss Aversion (Prevent losses rather than achieve gains) Planning Fallacy (under-estimating completion times) Wishful Thinking (pleasing rather than reality) Need For Closure (live with ambiguity?) Illusion of Transparency (over-estimating awareness of self/others) Negativity Bias (1 negative comment needs 5 positive) The Real Life Up Ahead Fallacy (NOW!) Blind Spots 127
  125. 125. Fear of failure Fear of success Fear of rejection Fear of starting Fear of finishing Fear of revealing too much about ourselves Fear of criticism Fears 128
  126. 126. Fear of making the wrong decision Fear of having hit one’s peak Fear of making a mistake Fear of not being good enough Fear of the business Fear of having regrets Fears 129
  127. 127. The first step is to rip away the denial. Look at what you think is your greatest strength and turn it around. Most fear is subconscious-- you will likely need help finding the true root. We bend our lives around our fears. Your fear won’t change things-- it has no power--it won’t keep the plane flying Fear can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Fears 130
  128. 128. Many people have difficulty internalizing their accomplishments We look to external things like luck and contacts as the reason for our successes We feel like we are ‘fooling’ everyone The more success someone has, the greater this feeling The Imposter Syndrome 131
  129. 129. Many people feel like a fraud “I still think people will find out that I’m really not very talented. I’m not very good. It’s all been a big sham.” Michelle Pfeiffer “Sometimes I wake up before going off to a shoot, and I think, I can’t do this; I’m a fraud. They’re going to fire me. I’m fat. I’m ugly . . .” Kate Winslet. Everyone has doubts The Imposter Syndrome 132
  130. 130. I can give the impression I am more competent than I really am. I often compare myself to those around me and consider them more intelligent than I am. I get discouraged if I’m not the ‘best’ in an endeavor. I hate being evaluated by others. If someone gives me praise for something I’ve accomplished, it makes me fear that I won’t live up to his or her expectations in the future. I’ve achieved my current position via luck and/or The Imposter Syndrome 133
  131. 131. When I think back to the past, incidents where I made mistakes or failed come more readily to mind than times when I was successful When I finish a job, I usually feel like I could have done so much better. When someone compliments me, I feel uncomfortable. I’m afraid others will find out my lack of knowledge/expertise. The Imposter Syndrome 134
  132. 132. HALO effect Focus on positive feedback Weed out your parent’s voice in your head if negative Be aware of using self-deprecation as a social strategy Internalize your accomplishments Read your own resume The Imposter Syndrome 135
  133. 133. “Have no fear of perfection-- you’ll never reach it.” Dali. 136
  134. 134. Living with fear is ultimately worse than confronting it Attack the ambush Put long-term goals ahead of short-term goals Lean into fear-- kaizen Be curious about your fear-- it’s a cave- but treasure could be inside Take action. Overcoming Fear
  135. 135. Where Are We Now? You know WHAT you want to achieve. You know WHY you want to achieve it. You under WHERE you will be achieving it. You understand your CHARACTER and that of others. You can do the three steps of CHANGE You utilize COURAGE to act in the face of fear.
  136. 136. Area III: DARES
  137. 137. Goal. Goal: Have personal leadership that can plan, motivate and take of yourself and those around you so that you can achieve your goals.
  138. 138. Leadership Problems. Prioritizing mission execution over people can be destructive to the team. Leadership styles don’t adapt to different situations and different people. People don’t exercise personal leadership. Poor communication, both verbal and written, degrades team efficiency. Inability to pull all the parts of team-building together for mission execution.
  139. 139. Leadership “We are all warriors in the battle of life, but some lead and others follow.” Kahlil Gibran
  140. 140. Step 6: COMMUNICATE.
  141. 141. Communication: The Problems. Most people don’t know the true purpose of communication. Many people send subconscious negatives in their communication. Much of communication on a team isn’t codified or if it is, isn’t used positively.
  142. 142. Communication: The Solutions. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of written communication. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of oral communication. Learn how to use Standing Operating Procedures. Learn how to use After Action Reviews and Reports.
  143. 143. What is Communication? The primary goal of communication is to evoke a response. Thus the receiver of the communique is more important than the sender. Thus, the sender needs to take the point of view of the person the message is intended for.
  144. 144. What is Communication? We are transmitting both logic and emotion. We are transmitting on the conscious and subconscious levels. We are externalizing something internal. Receiving a message correctly is also key. Figuring out what someone is really trying to transmit is a critical skill.
  145. 145. The Value of the Right Word: “No, my dear, it is I who am surprised; you are merely astonished.” Noah Webster, US Lexicopgrapher, responding to his wife’s comment that she had been surprised to find him embracing their maid.
  146. 146. The Role of Fear: Fear can make people dishonest, both consciously, and more often subconsciously. If something in a message disturbs you, focus on it. Action is the primary and most reliable means of communication, but the two we use next often are . . .
  147. 147. Written Communication: Writing makes things real. We speak differently than we write Think like the reader. Less is better.
  148. 148. Communication: “The great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a gap between one’s real and one’s declared aims, one turns as if were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms, like a cuttlefish squirting out ink.” George Orwell
  149. 149. Written Communication: Signifies responsibility. It’s in the public domain. Gets it out of your head into the real world.
  150. 150. Written Communication: Don’t qualify, say what you mean and say it simply. Organize institutional records. Information that can’t be accessed is useless.
  151. 151. Written Communication, Logs: Keep track of all written communication going in and out. Both paper and electronic. Use format that works for you. Use format that others can understand and access if you’re not present.
  152. 152. Written Communication: “I have just made a great discovery. I have separated ammonium protartrate with two salts of opposite action on the plane of polarization of light. The dextro-salt is in all respects identical with the dextroprotartrate. I am so happy and so overcome by such nervous excitement that I am unable again to place my eye to the polarization instrument.” Louis Pasteur.
  153. 153. Beware the Subconscious Negative: If you have the time, never respond immediately in writing. (danger of email). Watch word choice. You have no non-verbals. Beware slang and abbreviations-- people are often afraid to ask for clarification.
  154. 154. Beware the Subconscious Negative: “To be honest . . .” “... or else.” “You might not like this, but . . .”
  155. 155. Lord Raglan wishes the cavalry to advance rapidly to the front and to prevent the enemy from carrying away the guns. Horse artillery may accompany. French Cavalry is on your left. Immediate!
  156. 156. Oral Communication: Is faster and more immediate than written. It is more situational than written communication. Non-verbal is as large a part than even the words spoken.
  157. 157. Oral Communication: Use oral communication to gather information and reduce misunderstanding. Use it for quick dissemination of information. Use it for goal-defining and mission planning. For ‘war-gaming’.
  158. 158. “I don’t want any yes-men around me. I want everybody to tell me the truth even if it costs them their jobs.” Samuel Goldwyn.
  159. 159. Oral Communication Consider point of view-- who you’re sending the message to. “Relieve the wood train. Under no circumstances pursue the enemy beyond Lodge Train Ridge.” Colonel Carrington to Captain Fetterman.
  160. 160. Oral Communication: Listening. We filter everything through our point of view. Emotional response, especially negative, is an indicator. Search for the real message and for dishonesty.
  161. 161. Oral Communication: Not To. Less is better. “Three may keep a secret, if two of them are dead.” Benjamin Franklin. Amplification: People over-react to comments.
  162. 162. Standing Operating Procedures
  163. 163. Standing Operating Procedures: Define organizational and individual tasks. WRITTEN. They codify things and lock them down. They bring new personnel up to speed quickly. Delineate responsibilities. Stop your team from re-inventing the wheel. Take what you ‘know’ and write it down.
  164. 164. Standing Operating Procedures: Front-loading and time intensive. Overall, though, it saves time and energy. Sets standards and philosophy. Saves institutional knowledge and helps if you have high turnover. Needs to be updated, at least every six months or after a major mission.
  165. 165. How To Write SOPs Start with goals. Leader writes philosophy and policies. Each specialty does their own area, then briefs rest of team on it. Team actions are done together, usually in Isolation.
  166. 166. SOP Format: Leader policy letter. Standards of conduct. Organizational and team goals. Team assignments & duties. Individual SOPs. Equipment SOPs. Team SOPs for various missions. Team SOPs for communications.
  167. 167. Standing Operating Procedures: Nothing is impossible to the man who doesn’t have to do it. Smith & Wesson beats four aces. The latest information hasn’t been put out yet. There are two types of soldiers: the steely eyed killer and the beady-eyed minion. They give these people guns?
  168. 168. Standing Operating Procedures: The most basic tenet of teamwork is honesty. With rank and privilege comes responsibility. Everyone is a leader. We do everything together. Don’t get in a pissing contest with a man on a balcony: You just end up getting wet and smelly. Discipline stays at team level. Be on time. Keep your sense of humor-- you’ll need it.
  169. 169. SOPs: Example Isandlwahnda Failing to follow SOPs: No defense position prepared. Following SOPs: Would not give out ammunition.
  170. 170. Roger’s Rules of Rangering Don’t forget nothing. Tell the truth about what you see and do. When we camp, half the party stays awake while the other half sleeps. Don’t ever march home the same way. Take a different route so you won’t be ambushed.
  171. 171. SOPs: Example 10th Special Forces Group Off Post Training Requests All 15 A-Teams had developed their own system over the years 42 Different forms had accumulated 3 Forms were actually needed
  172. 172. SOPs Makes the team more important. Keeps institutional knowledge from disappearing. Saves time eventually.
  173. 173. How To Write SOPs Start with goals. Leader writes philosophy and policies. Each specialty does their own area, then briefs rest of team on it. Team actions are done together, usually in Isolation. SOPS have to be real and be used or they are useless.
  174. 174. After Action Reviews Was the goal achieved? Key is honesty. Judge success or failure?
  175. 175. Steps for an After Action Review Gather the right people. Go over the preparation for the activity. Summarize the events, chronologically with no commentary. Then ask why people took the actions they did. Balance negatives with positives. It is not a blame game and no punishment should follow. Summarize and make plans for changes. Update SOPs.
  176. 176. Step 7: Take COMMAND
  177. 177. Leadership “We are all warriors in the battle of life, but some lead and others follow.” Kahlil Gibran
  178. 178. Special Operations Leadership. Every team member is a leader. Leadership requires specific personal attributes.
  179. 179. Leadership: The Problems. Prioritizing mission execution over people can be destructive to the team. Leadership styles don’t adapt to different situations and different people. People don’t exercise personal leadership.
  180. 180. Leadership: The Solutions. Prioritizing people so that they can exceed in mission accomplishment. Leadership styles adapt to different situations and different people to provide a flexible team environment. Every team member exercises personal leadership.
  181. 181. The Importance of Leadership.
  182. 182. Leadership: The Definition. Leader: A person who leads others along a way; a guide. Leadership: The capacity to be a leader; ability to lead.
  183. 183. The Mission or the Men? The ‘Approved’ Solution= The Mission. The ‘Brave’ Solution= The Men and then the Mission. Focusing on Mission degrades your most valuable asset. Focusing on Mission limits your team’s capabilities and possibilities.
  184. 184. Paradoxical Leadership. “The discipline which makes the soldiers of a free country reliable in battle is not to be gained by harsh or tyrannical treatment. On the contrary, such treatment is far more likely to destroy than to make an army.” General Schofield’s Definition of Discipline.
  185. 185. Special Operations Leadership Honesty. Respect. Responsibility. Integrity. Trust. Team-Building.
  186. 186. Honesty “What I want is men who will support me when I am in the wrong.” Lord Melbourne.
  187. 187. Honesty SOF conduct covert ops so honesty is even more critical. Deepest fears are often rooted in secrets. Honesty is the touchstone of good communication. We teach people how to treat us. Willingness to admit when wrong, opens up communication. Asking for help is part of honesty. Leaders need to be aware of the potential for dishonesty. Honesty helps overcome fear. Honesty is the foundation of . . .
  188. 188. Respect Starts from leaders to subordinates and then is earned back. Never criticize in public. Critique action, not the person. Respect team members’ areas of expertise. Delegate.
  189. 189. Responsibility The leader is always responsible. Responsibility can’t be externalized. Responsibility is delineated when goals are specified. The SOP and Briefback help delineate responsibilities. Combining Honesty, Respect & Responsibility gives us the . . .
  190. 190. The Supervision Scale: Low Supervision: Self-motivated. Team-motivated. High creativity. Pro-active. High efficiency. High Supervision: Peer-motivated. Authority/fear-motivated. Status Quo focused. Reactive, Resistant to change. Low efficiency.
  191. 191. Integrity. From the Latin: Integritas (wholeness, completeness, and entirety). While our strongest subconscious defenses hide our greatest weaknesses, our integrity is a better conscious defense.
  192. 192. Trust. Firm belief in the reliability, truth, ability, or strength of someone or something. Acceptance of the truth or a statement without evidence or investigation.
  193. 193. Trust. Two way street. Starts with open communication. Cemented with action. Can I count on you in the crunch? Trust is an up-front investment that pays huge dividends.
  194. 194. Team-Building Bring out the true nature of individuals and the team via crisis and stress. Tests all four previous factors: honesty, respect, responsibility, and integrity. Gut checks. The opposite of the weakest link: the greatest strengths coalesce and form a union greater than the sum of its parts.
  195. 195. Point of View. What is reality? The elite are able to take other points of view. Focus on action. Most people live 100% in First Person POV. Conflict is often rooted in differing POVs.
  196. 196. People over Mission: There are times when you have to put the team members ahead of even mission accomplishment. However, keep a focus on the main goal. What is the ultimate task you will have to ask of your team members?
  197. 197. Leadership Variables Personality/Character: use templates. Motivation: the why behind the what. Goals: clearly delineated and aligned. Environment: CARVER.
  198. 198. Leadership Styles Dwight Eisenhower-- Political Strategist. Douglas MacArthur-- Military Strategist. George Patton-- Egomaniac Strategist George Custer-- Egomaniac Tactician. Joshua Chamberlain-- Strategic Tactician.
  199. 199. Eisenhower: Political Strategist Saw the big picture and the political implications (CARVER) Was more a manager than a leader. Used men like Patton to do the combat leading. Never made a decision under fire but made decisions that affected history. Managed the greatest military alliance in history. Ended up as a two term President.
  200. 200. MacArthur: Military Strategist. Felt destined. Making hard decision-- Philippines. Willingness to Learn-- After Philippines. Island Hopping. Failed on CARVER-- the Yalu and China. Didn’t understand politics.
  201. 201. Patton: Egomaniac Strategist. Total commitment and belief in himself. “It is loyalty from top to bottom which binds juniors to their seniors with the strength of steel.” Mission over men. Blood & Guts-- our blood, his guts. Failed on CARVER, in a way.
  202. 202. Custer: Egomaniac Tactician. Last in his class at West Point. General at 23. His unit had the highest percentage of casualties. Split his command at the Washita. And again at Little Big Horn.
  203. 203. Chamberlain: Strategic Tactician. Able to see the big picture and make a tactical decision to save the strategic. Acts decisively. At war’s end also saw the big picture and again made a tactical gesture that had strategic implications.
  204. 204. Priority Levels: Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Maslow’s hierarchy of information. What constitutes positive mental health. Humans are not the same as animals. Maslow had a positive view of people’s innate nature. One need is prepotent: primary motivator and if it’s an addiction, you’ve got a big problem.
  205. 205. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: Physiological/biological: things if deprived of, you die. Water, food, oxygen, physical warmth. Security: Safety from danger/disorganization. Shelter. Social: Escape feelings of loneliness and alienation. Self-respect and respect from others. Break point between negative and positive. Ego/Esteem: Becoming involved in a cause beyond ourselves. Self-actualization: Life has direction and meaning. A calling.
  206. 206. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Information: Coping: How to survive. Helping: How to be safe. Enlightening: How to be happier. Empowering: Seeking information to help the self. Edifying: Seeking moral or spiritual uplifting. Artistic expression.
  207. 207. Habit & Bureaucracy: Most of what we do is habit. Leaders have to enforce good habits. Bureaucracy is institutionalized habit. The paradox of less power at higher levels.
  208. 208. Special Operations Leadership Honesty. Respect. Responsibility. Integrity. Trust. Team-Building.
  209. 209. You worst-case the scenario. HBO: Hard Times You plan for the worst case-- Go To S$%# plan to avoid the worst case. It relies only on you and your readily available assets. Helps prevent the catastrophe. If the worst case happens, you have a plan. Most importantly, knowing that if thing Go To S$%#, you have a plan, reduces fear and Catastrophe Planning
  210. 210. Step 9: COMPLETE
  211. 211. Mission Execution: The Problems. The elements are in place, but not synchronized. Time is not used efficiently. There isn’t a system in place that designates and delegates.
  212. 212. Mission Execution: The Solutions. A Mission Tasking format is followed. Isolation is used to prepare for the mission A Briefback is conducted to coordinate the mission. Rule breaking is allowed to succeed.
  213. 213. Mission Tasking Starts with a Mission Tasking Packet: goal and intent. Passed down immediately. Do an immediate assessment for possible support needed. Mission briefing to those who have to do the actual operation. Isolation Mission planning. Briefback. Rehearsal. Execution.
  214. 214. Isolation: Allows team to focus on mission 100%. Normally only done negatively in society. No distractions.
  215. 215. Briefback: Go over the plan in order to get feedback and approval. Delineates responsibilities and coordinates support. Makes it real. Is everyone on the same plan? Get feedback and suggestions.
  216. 216. Rule Breaking: The paradoxical rules of rule breaking: 1. Know the rule. 2. Have a good reason for breaking the rule. 3. Accept the consequences of breaking the rule.
  217. 217. Rule Breaking A Mission T
  218. 218. Rule Breaking
  219. 219. • List your top 3 moments of enlightenment today. • What made you angry? • What made you afraid? • What motivated you? • What was something you can use right away.
  220. 220. • Using your MOE’s from previous exercise, what decisions will you make?
  221. 221. • Using your decision from previous exercise, what sustained action will you have to do?
  222. 222. More Free Information I constantly update free, downloadable slideshows like this on my web site for preparation and survival and other topics. Use Your Camera on this QR Code
  223. 223. Amazon
  224. 224. This book walks you through your personal situation, your home, and your Area of Operations.
  225. 225. AMAZON
  226. 226. New York Times bestselling author, is a graduate of West Point and former Green Beret. He’s had over 80 books published, including the #1 bestselling series Green Berets, Time Patrol, Area 51, and Atlantis. He’s sold over 5 million books. He was born in the Bronx and has traveled the world. He’s lived on an island off the east coast, an island off the west coast, in the Rocky Mountains, the Smoky Mountains and other places, including time in East Asia studying martial arts. They haven’t caught him yet. www.bobmayer.com

Notes de l'éditeur

  • There’s a common image of a red and white sign for Area 51 you can find
  • There’s a common image of a red and white sign for Area 51 you can find
  • Let me briefly orient you to SOF
  • 3 Areas
    3 Steps in each
  • 3 Areas
    3 Steps in each
  • 3 Areas
    3 Steps in each
  • Instructor Writer at JFK Special Warfare Center & School
    Currently live: Cha
  • 3 Areas
    3 Steps in each
  • why does the team exist?
  • Sounds simple but it is the number one organizational problem
    Liken this to someone knowing the original idea for their book
    Core of story and can’t change– all else can– thus allowing innovation off of solid base

    The key is being able to state you goals succinctly>>>>>
  • According to Gordon Gee: Students First
  • Organization and Team goal can be different if team is part of a larger organization.
  • Organization and Team goal can be different if team is part of a larger organization.
    Strategic vs. Tactical: war vs a battle.
  • A lot implied in that-- a lot of sub tasks-- morse code, maintaining radios, etc. etc.
  • Note all goals are in alignment.
  • Do they align?
  • Do they align?
  • Parameters= limits-- avoid unexpected or undesired results
    What results we don’t want.
  • This was our first step after getting our mission statement-- which consisted of Goal and Intent
  • Mackall was used to practice the Son Tay and Desert One Raids.
  • We’ll talk about CARVER shortly
  • Bodyguard of Lies
    SF Archives at Bragg
  • HALO INPUT AMAZON
  • Also, remember you can put together mission teams
  • Had MAROPS team.
  • Had MAROPS team.
    American commander=Navy
    Last rites
  • Hydrographic Survey
  • Area Studies help you develop SOPs
  • Bloodiest day in American history
    12,410 Union; 10,700 Confederate
    Could have waded the creek
  • why does the team exist?
  • But there are patterns to characters--templates
    Men over mission in SOF
    Recog character through actions
  • Breaking Bad
  • We are not the template for everyone.
  • DO YOU? Write down area and block that you feel best describes you.
  • Focus on what you aren’t!
  • Basically a lot of information and templates
    Up to you how you want to use it.
  • MOST THINK SUSTAINED ACTION IS HARDEST- BUT NOT NECESSARILY
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • mass casualty-- triage
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • Thus the SAR
    Ambushes
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • Kubler-Ross’s stages of death and dying
    also the editorial process
  • Kubler-Ross’s stages of death and dying
    also the editorial process
  • Kubler-Ross’s stages of death and dying
    also the editorial process
  • Change leads us to Leadership
  • Maslow’s Hiearchy of needs
  • What if you’re the one wounded?
    Letter to the editor
  • 6. Negativity bias: It takes five compliments to make up for one negative comment in a relationship.
    7. Fashionable darkness bias: this is an interesting one, especially for writers. Novels, movies and shows that have a dark ending are thought of as being more literary than ones having the HEA—happily ever after.
    8. The amazing success formula fallacy: this is something many people who to become writers fall for. That success happens overnight. My friend Susan Wiggs had her last book debut at #1 on the NY Times Bestseller list. In 2010. Her first book was published in 1988.
    9. The real life up ahead fallacy: That what you’re doing right now is the preparation for your ‘real life’ that will come some day.
  • Impostor syndrome next-- Fraud
  • This workshop is worthless is there isn’t change.
  • why does the team exist?
  • Sounds simple but it is the number one organizational problem
    Liken this to someone knowing the original idea for their book
    Core of story and can’t change– all else can– thus allowing innovation off of solid base

    The key is being able to state you goals succinctly>>>>>
  • wh
  • Pattern of Administration
  • why does the team exist?
  • w
  • why does the team exist?
  • why does the team exist?
  • why does the team exist?
  • why does the team exist?
  • Qual
  • Qualifiers tend to be subconscious: In my opinion. it appears that,
  • p
  • I hope you will buy this book
    threats
  • I hope you will buy this book
    threats
  • So you usually lie?
  • why does the team exist?
  • Drop your bags
  • w
  • why does the team exist?
  • 1866, Ft Kearny 80 dead, Crazy Horse
  • 1
  • 1
  • AKA Pattern of Administration
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • NTC 1970s
  • N
  • Sounds simple but it is the number one organizational problem
    Liken this to someone knowing the original idea for their book
    Core of story and can’t change– all else can– thus allowing innovation off of solid base

    The key is being able to state you goals succinctly>>>>>
  • why does the team exist?
  • why does the team exist?
  • w
  • why does the team exist?
  • At West Point and in the Infantry
  • why does the team exist?
  • why does the team exist?
  • Replying to a politician who said he would support Melbourne as long as he was in the right.
  • go to therapist and lie?
    cover stories are best that are closest to truth
  • w
  • But since everyone is a leader---
  • Don’t confuse low supervision with not caring
  • Roman soldier strikes chest and shouts it-- armor had to be thickest over heart.
  • R
  • R
  • Denmark-- runs
    Men Who Stare At Goats
  • w
  • Band of Brothers-- last patrol
  • We’ve covered all these already
    here are some classic examples of types
  • 55 of 60 battles in Civil War
  • 1915 Class Stars Fell On 59/164 Generals
    Major 20 years, LTC-5 Star in 3
    Pershing’s Aide, then MacArthur
    Wrote Oplan for WWII-- Europe First
  • USMA ’03, father MOH winner
    Rainbow Division, Four Silver Stars-Dugout
    Got MOH for running away
    lost fewer men than battle Bulge
  • We’
  • Never really led at lower levels.
    Went AWOL
    shot his own horse twice
    Not willing to learn from his mistakes
  • We’
  • Took a different approach-- not what is sick, but what is healthy. Freud focused on sick people
    Skinner focused on rats and pigeons.
  • The higher you go, the lonelier you get.
    Society can be a blocking force in climbing the hierarchy.
  • Military schools like taking you down to level 1, then rebuilding you. But such training usually only works once and only takes you so far up the scale.
  • wh
  • why does the team exist?
  • Schwarzeneger and Real Estate
    Writing scared
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • CASMAP
    Michelle AST here
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • w
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • GO AROUND ROOM-- THIS IS goal setting for workshop
  • There’s a common image of a red and white sign for Area 51 you can find

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