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The new manager role in scrum teams and beyond | SupremeAgile

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Traditional management approach (Pre Agile).
The transition from traditional methodologies (Waterfall) to Agile (Scrum).
How Scrum transition affects managers (Fears, Resistance, and Outcomes).
Overcoming manager fears and resistance as a key factor to success.
Opportunities in the Scrum framework.
What does it mean to be an Agile manager?
Summary.

Publié dans : Technologie

The new manager role in scrum teams and beyond | SupremeAgile

  1. 1. THE NEW MANAGER ROLE IN SCRUM TEAMS AND BEYOND DAVID TZEMACH WWW.SUPREMEAGILE.COM JUN 28 2018
  2. 2. ABOUT ME • OVER 15 YEARS IN THE SOFTWARE-DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRY. • HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN MULTIPLE COMPANIES’ (~80) AGILE TRANSFORMATIONS. • CURRENTLY THE GLOBAL QUALITY ARCHITECT AND AGILE TRAINER OF VARONIS SYSTEMS LTD. • FOUNDER OF THE “SUPREMEAGILE” QUALITY AND AGILE BLOG (~45K FOLLOWERS, 850K UNIQUE VIEWS WORLDWIDE).
  3. 3. AGENDA • TRADITIONAL MANAGEMENT APPROACH (PRE AGILE). • THE TRANSITION FROM TRADITIONAL METHODOLOGIES (WATERFALL) TO AGILE (SCRUM). • HOW SCRUM TRANSITION AFFECTS MANAGERS (FEARS, RESISTANCE AND OUTCOMES). • OVERCOMING MANAGER FEARS AND RESISTANCE AS KEY FACTOR TO SUCCESS. • OPPORTUNITIES IN THE SCRUM FRAMEWORK. • WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE AN AGILE MANAGER. • SUMMARY.
  4. 4. Industry Facts Fact 1: The challenges in software industry are different than a few years ago (security, mobile, cloud…) Fact 2: We are seeing more companies making the transition to Agile development processes (Scrum, Kanban, etc.) Fact 3: Organizations must deliver fast, early products at the highest quality Fact 4: Employees’ welfare is critical to the organization’s success Fact 5: The role of managers is the one that is most affected from these Agile transitions
  5. 5. TRADITIONAL MANAGEMENT APPROACH (PRE AGILE)
  6. 6. THE TRADITIONAL MANAGER MANAGEMENT STYLE IS MOSTLY BASED ON THE “COMMAND & CONTROL” METHOD HERE ARE FIVE OF THE PRIMARY CHARACTERISTICS OF THIS KIND OF MANAGE 2. Strict hierarchy of authority (manager at the top of the pyramid) 1. Control all major aspects of the project (timelines, pace, task assignments) 5. Commands must be followed or discipline is applied 3. Micro management 4. Zero tolerance to mistakes
  7. 7. THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE MANAGER AND HIS EMPLOYEES IS BASED ON FIVE PHASES: PHASE 1: IDENTIFICATION OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL “NEEDS” (BUDGET, RESOURCES, REQUIREMENTS) PHASE 2: PROVIDING EMPLOYEE DEMANDS, EXPECTATIONS, AND GOALS PHASE 3: EMPLOYEES FOLLOW THE MANAGER’S INSTRUCTIONS WITHOUT QUESTION PHASE 4: MONITORING EMPLOYEE PROGRESS OF TASK COMPLETION PHASE 5: COMPARING EMPLOYEES’ DELIVERABLES TO THE PRELIMINARY GOALS
  8. 8. The outcomes of “Command & Control”: Low Motivation Manager in the center Less room for Innovation and Creativity Employees are treated as resources
  9. 9. In scrum, Self-organized teams are the center of the entire process… Managers will have to change to keep their relevancy
  10. 10. THE BEGINNING OF A NEW ERA: MANAGING IN AGILE
  11. 11. 1970 Waterfall model created 1990 Application delivery lag crisis 1991 Invention of Scrum Jeff Sutherland and Ken Schwaber 1995 Scrum published and used for the first time 2001 Agile Manifest o THE BIRTH OF AGILE AND SCRUM (TIMELINE)
  12. 12. From 2001 Scrum becomes the leading software development methodology worldwide
  13. 13. What is the impact of transitioning Scrum will be on the manager?
  14. 14. HOW SCRUM AFFECTS MANAGERS (FEARS AND RESISTANCE)?
  15. 15. Let’s review some classic examples…..
  16. 16. The Scrum framework specifies three main roles… But no definition for managers….
  17. 17. The management hierarchy is different….. Top-Down (Authority) Bottom-Up (Team Ownership) All Equals with the same ability to impact Decide everything
  18. 18. A completely different SDLC…. Waterfall Model Scrum Model One Major release Change is bad Change is normal Incremental Releases
  19. 19. Managers are the ones affected the most from Scrum transition… Loss of their old titles Losing their jobs Their ability to affect on the project Hurting their pride and ego
  20. 20. What reasons can managers have to resist to Scrum transition?
  21. 21. MANAGER RESISTANCE, OUTCOMES AND MITIGATION
  22. 22. Cause of resistance The outcomes… What can be done? Lose power over individuals Interfering in team decisions that will not allow “self-organization” Show them how to become the servant leaders of their teams (we will talk about it….) Loss of their ability to add value to the organization Low motivation, low confidence Empowerment as key leaders of the transformation Fear of change Lack of collaboration with the transitioning process Collaborate to create the transformation roadmap, goals, timelines, phases…. Training sessions will provide a general sense of what Scrum is and how it works Uncertainty about their new responsibilities, boundaries… Keep the old C&C habits Micro management, measuring individuals’ performance….
  23. 23. A QUICK RECAP…. • TRADITIONAL MANAGEMENT APPROACH (PRE AGILE). • THE TRANSITION FROM TRADITIONAL METHODOLOGIES (WATERFALL) TO AGILE (SCRUM). • HOW SCRUM AFFECTS MANAGERS (FEARS, RESISTANCE AND OUTCOMES). • OVERCOMING MANAGER FEARS AND RESISTANCE AS KEY FACTOR TO SUCCESS.
  24. 24. OPPORTUNITIES IN THE SCRUM FRAMEWORK
  25. 25. Hello team, I am your Product Owner The Product Owner’s main responsibilities • Represent the customer/business. • Managing product backlog (prioritization, acceptance criteria, DoD…). • Define the iteration objectives. • Plans product releases. • Accepts/declines the work.
  26. 26. Hello team, is there room for me? The main responsibilities of the development team: • All are equals • Commit to the work • Cross-functional • Self-organized
  27. 27. Hello team, I’m your Scrum Master! The main responsibilities of the Scrum Master: • Trainer in Scrum framework • Remove impediments • Protect the team
  28. 28. An Agile manager with different mindset (We will define it..) The main responsibilities of the Agile manager: • Does not need authority over the team (Excepted as the team leader). • Handle HR issues (1:1, Hiring Etc.). • Gain access to resources. • Remove obstacles. • Builds the team.
  29. 29. The most commonly asked question during Scrum transitions: If we have SM, why do we need managers?
  30. 30. Phase 1: What do we see in our industry? TMSM Team A SM Team B Phase 2: How do I see these roles? TM SM Team C TM • Mentoring and coaching capabilities • Leader who does not need authority • Has specific responsibility in the Scrum Framework How I see the SM role? How do I see Agile manager? • Can preform ALL SM activities. • Handling all HR issues. Phase 3: The Path to the NEW Agile manager Managers will have to become great SM to become a Agile manager! SM Team D AM
  31. 31. PRACTICAL TIPS TO BECOME AN AGILE MANAGER
  32. 32. Change your management style As the Agile Manager of the team, the manager should change his/her management style: • Making room for failure and using it as growth engine for the team • Motivating the team by identifying their unique motivation buttons • Focus on the success of the team instead of his/her own • Manage by questions, not by answers • Empowering the team and individual • Listen first, act later
  33. 33. Become a change agent The Agile Manager will assist with the business to maximize the benefits of Scrum: • Plan Scrum implementation within the organization • Promote continuous improvement • Be patient while promoting the change • Build a new cross-functional team (Model T) • Train their team with Scrum practices
  34. 34. Move from a single authority to a servant leader As a servant leader, managers will assist teams to become self-organized: • Remove organizational impediments affecting teams’ ability to flourish • Help the team collaborate better (internally / externally) • Handling HR issues affecting individuals’ performance • Facilitate the Scrum events (planning, review…) • Encourage transparency within the team • Lead by example
  35. 35. THE DAILY STAND-UP AS AN INDICATOR TO THE SELF-ORGANIZED TEAM 1. Does your team conduct daily’s without you? 2. If you are present does the meeting become a “Reporting” meeting? 3. Do your team members feel safe enough to share their status? 4. Are there any “Conversations” among team members after the meeting? 5. Does the team succeed to keep the meeting within the time limitation? 6. Are team members offering their help to other members? 7. Is there an active promotion by You/SM? 8. Do team members come prepared?
  36. 36. THE RETROSPECTIVE MEETING AS AN ENGINE FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT 1. Were team members authentic? 2. Did team members feel safe enough to share their real thoughts? 3. Were the root causes of problems uncovered? 4. Did the SM manage the list of impediments raised by the team? 5. Did the team have an action plan to resolve the raised impediments? 6. Did the impediments raised at the previous meeting get resolved?
  37. 37. FOR ADDITIONAL KB’S PLEASE VISIT MY BLOG WWW.SUPREMEAGILE.COM

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