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Drawing Stories for User Experiences (UX) - April 2015

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Simple sketching and storyboarding for collaboration, research, and user-centric experience design. This is a newly updated and expanded deck with new examples, and a reading and resource list at the end. I presented this talk at the San Jose State University User Experience Association Guest Speakers Day in April 2015.

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Drawing Stories for User Experiences (UX) - April 2015

  1. 1. DEB AOKI sr. information experience designer citrix April 18, 2015 DRAWING STORIES FOR UX simple sketching and storyboarding for collaboration, research, and user-centric experience design
  2. 2. HELLO. UX Design + Content Strategy + Comics + Manga Nerd = Deb Aoki
  3. 3. I LOVE COMICS. I READ COMICS. I DRAW COMICS. • Bento Box in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser 3
  4. 4. 4 I WRITE ABOUT COMICS TOO.
  5. 5. 5 MEANWHILE, MOST OF MY JOBS WERE ABOUT WRITING FOR THE WEB
  6. 6. 6 THEN I GOT A CONTENT STRATEGY JOB AT…
  7. 7. And suddenly, my drawing skills came in handy again. 7
  8. 8. 8 NOW I’M AT… I still write, but now I mostly draw. …which is pretty awesome
  9. 9. PICTURES > WORDS WHY WRITE WHEN YOU CAN DRAW IT INSTEAD?
  10. 10. Focuses on human needs and concerns instead of just technology / business needs or limitations Participants / customers feel heard and understood Visuals are memorable and can lead to new insights Drawings are more FUN! and more engaging than just text WHY DRAW PICTURES?
  11. 11. MORE REASONS TO DRAW PICTURES 11 • Pictures can communicate quickly and powerfully, especially abstract ideas and user experiences. It’s a universal language! • It’s very persuasive! Pictures can evoke emotions, empathy, and inspire action • Faster and cheaper than coding clickable prototypes or designing wireframes, or polished page mock-ups • Provides a ‘big picture’ perspective of the entire user experience, goals & messaging • Gets attention where boring clip art and graphs can be ignored
  12. 12. EVEN MORE REASONS TO DRAW PICTURES 12 • Easy way to check the end-to-end experience to check for gaps, potential issues. If you can’t illustrate it, it may not make sense / may not matter to user • It’s informal and fun, so it encourages participation and open discussions • Helps get everyone on the same page, clears up anything that’s vague or unresolved • Gets you in the room earlier in the product design process • Emphasizes concerns are about customers, not just about your opinions as a designer/researcher
  13. 13. HOW CAN SKETCHING HELP WITH UX? I’M GLAD YOU ASKED! HERE ARE A FEW EXAMPLES
  14. 14. BRAINSTORM IDEAS: shopping cart PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 14
  15. 15. BRAINSTORM IDEAS: customer journey mapping PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 15
  16. 16. PAINT A “BIG PICTURE”: shopping cart PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 16
  17. 17. PAINT A “BIG PICTURE”: thanksgiving 2012 PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 17
  18. 18. EXPLAIN HOW IT WORKS: green box user flows PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 18
  19. 19. EXPLAIN HOW IT WORKS: Xenmobile storyboard PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 19
  20. 20. UNDERSTAND CUSTOMERS: user/stakeholder personas 20 Mobile workers Managers/ employers Café owners Citrix / GoTo Meeting Designers/PMs/Devs
  21. 21. UNDERSTAND CUSTOMERS: GoTo Meeting personas 21 The Butler “You can count on me!” The Investigator “I need all the facts” The Facilitator “I’m here to help” The Networker “I connect people” The Sprinter “Let’s get this done quickly” The Preparer “I need time to plan carefully”
  22. 22. UNDERSTAND CUSTOMERS: Customer Interviews 22
  23. 23. ILLUSTRATE PAIN POINTS: shopping cart PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 23
  24. 24. ILLUSTRATE PAIN POINTS: too many buttons PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 24
  25. 25. SELL AN IDEA: student accounts PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 25
  26. 26. SELL AN IDEA: CubeFree app PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 26
  27. 27. TEST A CONCEPT: group gifts PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 27
  28. 28. TEST A CONCEPT: go together PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 28
  29. 29. ‘BUT I CAN’T DRAW’ If you can draw dots, circles, squares and lines, you can draw. Yes, you can!
  30. 30. CIRCLE + SQUARE + DOTS + LINES = PEOPLE! PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 30
  31. 31. ADD A FEW TWEAKS = DIFFERENT PEOPLE PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 31
  32. 32. MORE WAYS TO DRAW PEOPLE PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 32 DAVE GRAY Gamestorming BRANDY AGERBECK The Graphic Facilitator’s Guide
  33. 33. MORE WAYS TO DRAW PEOPLE PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 33 DAVID SIBBETTS Visual Meetings DAN ROAM The Back of the Napkin
  34. 34. EVEN MORE WAYS TO DRAW PEOPLE PRESENTATION TITLE GOES HERE 34 MIKE ROHDE The Sketchnote Handbook MARTIN HAUSSMAN Biklablo
  35. 35. CIRCLE + DOTS + LINES = FACES AND EMOTIONS PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 35
  36. 36. ADD FEATURES = DIFFERENT CHARACTERS PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 36
  37. 37. BODY LANGUAGE CAN SAY ALOT PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 37
  38. 38. WORD BALLOONS… WITHOUT WORDS PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 38
  39. 39. CONNECT CONCEPTS WITH LINES PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 39 Direct connection / action Tentative action Convoluted path Bouncing
  40. 40. DRAW COMMON CONCEPTS IN A FEW STROKES 40 idea lock / security time listen cloud laptop NO! money fast slowsmartphone email
  41. 41. DRAW COMMON PLACES IN A FEW STROKES
  42. 42. DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES OF USER INTERACTION PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 42 CLOSE-UP Emphasis on screen/finger interaction MID-TORSO Emphasis on screen SEMI-CLOSE Emphasis on device / human context/use FULL BODY Emphasis on ‘real world’ context/place of use
  43. 43. USE COLOR TO CONVEY DIFFERENT EMOTIONS / CONCEPTS / PERSONALITIES PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 43
  44. 44. USE COLOR TO CONVEY DIFFERENT EMOTIONS / CONCEPTS / PERSONALITIES PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 44 BLACK – Most important info / facts GREY – Secondary info / tentative RED – important / error / danger / stop GREEN – success / money / nature / go BLUE – calm / cool / water / sky / masculine ORANGE – cheerful / hot / caution PINK – fun / playful / youthful / feminine PURPLE – regal / sophisticated / serious BROWN – earthy / simple / dirty YELLOW – bright / accents / hard to read as text
  45. 45. COLORS can be an easy way to differentiate personas PRESENTATION TITLE GOES HERE 45 Female / Male Army / Navy Biz A / Biz B Differences within a group Japan / US / Germany Citrix / Apple / Google
  46. 46. COLORS can be an easy way to differentiate personas Colors can indicate different teams / stakeholders, make it easier to follow information flows
  47. 47. COLORS can show different user flows Colors can indicate different groups of people, make it easier to show user interactions in a physical environment
  48. 48. USE COLOR SELECTIVELY for emphasis, convey emotions PRESENTATION TITLE GOES HERE 48
  49. 49. DIFFERENT COLORS = DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 49
  50. 50. AS YOU DRAW, ASK THESE QUESTIONS: PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 50 Who is the user/customer? • What’s most important to them? • What are they trying to do / What do they want to do? • Does the user have any fears/obstacles? What’s the problem that we’re solving for the user? • What do they need to know before trying this? • What are their motivations and needs? What’s at stake? What’s in it for them? (benefits) • Why would they click the button/download / sign up? • How are we making their lives better/easier/simpler? • What happens if they don’t use this? • What would they do instead?
  51. 51. AS YOU DRAW, ASK THESE QUESTIONS: PICTURES > WORDS: STORYBOARDING AT EBAY 51 How is this different/better than similar services / experiences from other companies? (differentiators) • Why would they choose this? • Why would they opt to not try this? What if something goes wrong? • What can they do to fix things? • What will they see next? / What will happen? • Where can they get help? These questions can provide clarity of purpose and help to create a shared vision for your project
  52. 52. 6 VISUAL STORYTELLING TIPS PLUS: 2 SITUATIONS WHERE IT’S PROBABLY BETTER TO PUT DOWN YOUR PEN
  53. 53. KEEP YOUR STORY SHORT 53 Your story should be limited to 10-12 panels or less if possible. If it needs more panels, consider breaking story into segments.
  54. 54. SHOWING IT > SAYING IT 54 Let the pictures tell the story. If you removed the captions, would it still make sense?
  55. 55. KEEP CAPTIONS SHORT AND SIMPLE 55 Captions should be simple, easy to skim. Too much text = visual clutter
  56. 56. LIMIT YOUR COLOR PALETTE 56 Use color selectively to emphasize important things, communicate differences, or convey emotions. Too many colors can be distracting
  57. 57. LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM 57 Give the reader a predictable, intuitive path to read your story. Don’t leave them wondering what to look at next.
  58. 58. PICTURES, NOT PERFECTION 58 Speed, simplicity and clarity is more important than making “perfect” pictures. It doesn’t have to be beautiful/detailed to communicate ideas.
  59. 59. SKETCHING ISN’T ALWAYS THE ANSWER 59 It’s difficult to draw what you don’t understand / can’t visualize Beware of situations where the speakers are using a lot of unfamiliar or complex/industry- specific terms/acronyms/concepts Know your audience Sometimes a “cartoon”/“comic” isn’t appropriate when the topic is serious / politically sensitive. It can feel “cutesy,” disrespectful / un-businesslike in some situations
  60. 60. 5 STEPS FOR DRAWING STORYBOARDSBrainstorm > Script > Sketch > Finalize > Adapt
  61. 61. 61 STEP 1: BRAINSTORM IDEAS / SKETCH
  62. 62. 62 STEP 2: WRITE A SCRIPT
  63. 63. 63 STEP 3: DRAW ROUGH SKETCHES
  64. 64. 64 STEP 4: GET FEEDBACK / FINALIZE ART
  65. 65. 65 STEP 5: ADAPT VECTOR LINE ART OR VARIATIONS
  66. 66. BOOKS AND CLASSES Want to learn more? Here’s what to read and where to go! 66
  67. 67. 67 READ ALL ABOUT IT: Drawing for Meetings & UX BRANDY AGERBECK The Graphic Facilitator’s Guide DAVID SIBBETTS Visual Meetings DAN ROAM The Back of the Napkin KEVIN CHENG See What I Mean SUNNI BROWN The Doodle Revolution JEANNEL KING Draw Forth
  68. 68. 68 READ ALL ABOUT IT: Drawing, Comics, and Sketchnotes SCOTT McCLOUD Understanding Comics Making Comics ED EMBERLEY Drawing Books MIKE ROHDE The Sketchnote Handbook The Sketchnote Workbook MARTIN HAUSSMAN Biklablo JESSICA ABEL & MATT MADDEN Drawing Words and Writing Pictures Mastering Comics
  69. 69. 69 MORE WAYS TO LEARN: Workshops and classes IFVP Professional group for graphic facilitators http://ifvpcommunity.ning.com/ THE GROVE graphic facilitation classes and books www.grove.com CENTER FOR GRAPHIC FACILITATION Blog and online drawing classes http://www.graphicfacilitation.blogs.com VERBAL TO VISUAL CLASSROOM Blog and online drawing classes http://www.verbaltovisualclassroom.com/
  70. 70. QUESTIONS? THANK YOU! EMAIL: DEBORA.AOKI@CITRIX.COM TWITTER: @DEBAOKI ALSO AT: HTTP://WWW.MANGACOMICSMANGA.COM

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