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Dysfunction vs.
Efficiency
AN INTERNAL SELF-APPRAISAL
The Emotional Themes
The overall emotional theme of an EFFICIENT organization
is…
The Emotional Themes
The overall emotional theme of an EFFICIENT organization
is…
CONFIDENCE
Confidence
1. I/we are VALUED
2. I/we are CAPABLE
3. I/we are SUPPORTED
4. I/we are RESPONSIBLE
5. I/we are a TEAM
Signs of the Efficient
Organization
Emotional
• Leadership engaged, available, responsive, FRIENDLY
• People look forward ...
Signs of the Efficient
Organization
Operational
• People Know Their Role and Take Responsibility—”I AM” “I
WILL” “I CAN”
•...
Signs of the Efficient
Organization
Operational (Continued)
• Committees/meetings solve as many problems as
they discuss w...
Signs of the Efficient
Organization
Technical/Technological
• Technology has a purpose
• Members understand the purpose an...
The Emotional Themes
The overall emotional theme of a DYSFUNCTIONAL
organization is….
The Emotional Themes
The overall emotional theme of a DYSFUNCTIONAL
organization is…
FEAR
Confidence
1. I/we are MEANINGLESS
2. I/we are UNDERTRAINED
3. I/we are ON OUR OWN
4. I/we are IN THE DARK
5. I/we are ALO...
Signs of the Dysfunctional
Organization
Emotional
• Absentee leadership OR Hovering management
• Frequent interpersonal cr...
Signs of the Dysfunctional
Organization
Operational
• People Avoid Responsibility—”I‘m not” “Not me” “Sorry, can’t”
• When...
Signs of the Dysfunctional
Organization
Technical/Technological
• Technology for technology’s sake—
Watchfire vs. campfire...
Negativity: The Core of
Dysfunction
Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that
causes others to feel:
Negativity: The Core of
Dysfunction
Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that
causes others to feel:
 Angry-- “...
Negativity: The Core of
Dysfunction
Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that
causes others to feel:
 Angry
 D...
Negativity: The Core of
Dysfunction
Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that
causes others to feel:
 Angry
 D...
Negativity: The Core of
Dysfunction
Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that
causes others to feel:
 Angry
 D...
Negativity: The Core of
Dysfunction
Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that
causes others to feel:
 Angry
 D...
Causes of Negativity Go
Both Ways
Top Down:
1. Poor communication
2. Sudden/frequent direction
changes OR poor “change
man...
Causes of Negativity Go
Both Ways
Bottom Up
1. Personality issues
2. Resistance to change-
“Change is LOSS.”**
3. Cultural...
Am I…?
Dysfunctional
• Burnt out
• Territorial
• Bitter
• Gruff
• Sarcastic/Disrespectful
• Secretive/Lonely
• Aloof
• Fra...
Increasing Efficiency is
Decreasing Dysfunction
EMOTIONAL
• Never discount the impact of your emotional state*
• Never dis...
Increasing Efficiency is
Decreasing Dysfunction
TECHNICAL/TECHNOLOGICAL
• Assess your training. Is it adequate? If not, sa...
Increasing Efficiency is
Decreasing Dysfunction
OPERATIONAL
• Give honest evaluations using constructive language
(communi...
Efficiency vs. Effectiveness
“Efficiency is doing things
right; effectiveness is doing
the right things.”
—P. Drucker
Are ...
The Seven Stinkbugs
And How To Deal
1.The Whiner
2.The Know-It-All
3.The Town Crier
4.The Underminer
5.The Office Bully
6....
The Whiner
Feels: Discomfort and Frustration
Lacks: Filter
Discusses: Their immediate emotional state and
what/who is caus...
The Know It All
Feels: Insecurity (or a genuine sense of superiority)
Lacks: Self-awareness
Discusses: What others are doi...
The Town Crier
Feels: Unimportant, Powerless, Lacking Attention
Lacks: Empathy
Discusses: The behavior and flaws of other ...
The Underminer
Feels: Frustrated at Status, Resentment of Authority
Lacks: Insight
Discusses: How “The Man” (YOU) is keepi...
The Bully
Feels: Compulsive need for dominance and control to further a
strictly PERSONAL agenda
Lacks: Empathy/Social Con...
Eeyore/Debbie Downer
Feels: Low motivation, high frustration
Lacks: Perspective
Discusses: How and why whatever project mi...
The Ninja
Feels: Frustration at status, resentment of authority, need for
power and control
Lacks: Forthrightness (Is Two-...
1. Share your observations—Tell the employee what
you/your team have seen without offering judgment
“Gloria, I have gotten...
Dr. Marie McIntyre’s Five Steps
of Coaching Behavior
1. Share your observations—Tell the employee what
you/your team have ...
3. Discuss Causes and Barriers—Here the employee can
explain/offer excuses/try to pass blame, etc. Listen as carefully,
ca...
Dr. Marie McIntyre’s Five Steps
of Coaching Behavior
3. Discuss Causes and Barriers—Here the employee can
explain/offer ex...
5. Provide Ongoing Feedback—This is to let the employee know
that you not only continue to monitor their behavior, but tha...
Document, Document,
Document
Find out if your city or departmental HR department has forms for
documenting disciplinary/co...
Document,Document,
Document
Recommended Reading
http://yourofficecoach.com
http://theworkplacetherapist.com
The No-A**hole Rule: Building a Civilized ...
The Efficient Organization vs. The Dysfunctional Organization
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The Efficient Organization vs. The Dysfunctional Organization

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What are the earmarks of an efficient organization? A dysfunctional one? What kind of worker behaviors and emotional states hurt efficiency and how can those workers be coached to improve?

Publié dans : Business

The Efficient Organization vs. The Dysfunctional Organization

  1. 1. Dysfunction vs. Efficiency AN INTERNAL SELF-APPRAISAL
  2. 2. The Emotional Themes The overall emotional theme of an EFFICIENT organization is…
  3. 3. The Emotional Themes The overall emotional theme of an EFFICIENT organization is… CONFIDENCE
  4. 4. Confidence 1. I/we are VALUED 2. I/we are CAPABLE 3. I/we are SUPPORTED 4. I/we are RESPONSIBLE 5. I/we are a TEAM
  5. 5. Signs of the Efficient Organization Emotional • Leadership engaged, available, responsive, FRIENDLY • People look forward to coming to work, concentrate on their role in the organization first and foremost • People get along and have open, intelligent, honest conversations (rivalries and resentments are discussed and managed) • Smiles are seen, laughter is heard • Slights are dealt with in proportion to their seriousness • Ideas are shared without fear or envy • Tears of sadness or joy, not frustration • No apologies for honesty
  6. 6. Signs of the Efficient Organization Operational • People Know Their Role and Take Responsibility—”I AM” “I WILL” “I CAN” • When someone asks “Why?,” they get an answer • Communication is top-down AND bottom-up – Complaint + Solution + Authority = Innovation • Chain of command is clear, makes sense and is respected • Supervisors and line trust each other--NO MICROMANAGEMENT • Tasks get done in a timely fashion—people ask for help, responsibility is delegated • Requests are reasonable and “yes” is heard more often than “no” • The buck stops sooner rather than later • Flexibility—”We’ll try that.”
  7. 7. Signs of the Efficient Organization Operational (Continued) • Committees/meetings solve as many problems as they discuss within a reasonable time frame • Policies are fair and consistent, processes logical and effective, line workers involved in creation— No “HUH?” Factor • Criticism is gently given and well-taken: BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT • Emergencies don’t cause panic • The boss(es) can take criticism AND put it to use
  8. 8. Signs of the Efficient Organization Technical/Technological • Technology has a purpose • Members understand the purpose and are trained to use technology well—”Function Keys” • Facilitates operational and emotional success
  9. 9. The Emotional Themes The overall emotional theme of a DYSFUNCTIONAL organization is….
  10. 10. The Emotional Themes The overall emotional theme of a DYSFUNCTIONAL organization is… FEAR
  11. 11. Confidence 1. I/we are MEANINGLESS 2. I/we are UNDERTRAINED 3. I/we are ON OUR OWN 4. I/we are IN THE DARK 5. I/we are ALONG FOR THE RIDE
  12. 12. Signs of the Dysfunctional Organization Emotional • Absentee leadership OR Hovering management • Frequent interpersonal crises—GRUDGES, TANTRUMS • People dread work, lose sleep, emotionally fear co-worker(s), call in sick, high/quick turnover, concentrate on outside interests (organizations, associations) • Behind-the-back sniping, gossip, cattiness, cowardly criticism, cliques (barking dogs) • People “freak out” when they perceive disrespect (perspective) • Ideas are sat on out of fear of criticism or lack or recognition/”credit theft” • Criticism is totally avoided (or is too harsh) and is always taken personally • General Sense of Frustration/Hopelessness—*SIGH* • People make excuses for themselves and others • “Stinkbugs” (A**holes)—MORE ON THIS LATER
  13. 13. Signs of the Dysfunctional Organization Operational • People Avoid Responsibility—”I‘m not” “Not me” “Sorry, can’t” • When someone asks “Why?,” they get stonewalled • Communication is infrequent, inconsistent and unclear • People go over supervisor’s head, around each other, behind backs: Constant “Whistleblowing” • No trust, no drive—MICROMANAGEMENT and MOTIVE QUESTIONING • Tasks go undone, get ignored, get pawned off • Requests are unreasonable and people corner each other into saying “no”—causes resentment • The buck never stops—”I thought he said he would handle that!” or “That’s how ‘they’ want it.” • Committees/meetings go on forever, avoid decisions, meet for sake of “Work-cation” • Policies make no sense or are reactive, processes get “grandfathered” in—The “Federal Helium Program” Factor • Inflexible—”It can’t be done that way” OR “That will never work.”
  14. 14. Signs of the Dysfunctional Organization Technical/Technological • Technology for technology’s sake— Watchfire vs. campfire • Members don’t understand why something is there, become less efficient • Leads to frustration and “just doing it by hand”
  15. 15. Negativity: The Core of Dysfunction Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that causes others to feel:
  16. 16. Negativity: The Core of Dysfunction Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that causes others to feel:  Angry-- “I am under attack”
  17. 17. Negativity: The Core of Dysfunction Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that causes others to feel:  Angry  Depressed— “I am powerless”
  18. 18. Negativity: The Core of Dysfunction Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that causes others to feel:  Angry  Depressed  Discouraged— “I am failing”
  19. 19. Negativity: The Core of Dysfunction Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that causes others to feel:  Angry  Depressed  Discouraged  Anxious– “Danger is imminent”
  20. 20. Negativity: The Core of Dysfunction Negativity is any verbal or nonverbal behavior that causes others to feel:  Angry  Depressed  Discouraged  Anxious  Hopeless– “I don’t care anymore”
  21. 21. Causes of Negativity Go Both Ways Top Down: 1. Poor communication 2. Sudden/frequent direction changes OR poor “change management” 3. Lack of clear vision 4. Lack of appreciation/ understanding
  22. 22. Causes of Negativity Go Both Ways Bottom Up 1. Personality issues 2. Resistance to change- “Change is LOSS.”** 3. Cultural issues 4. Frustration (career, personal) **1. Meaning 2. Control 3. Competence 4. Relationship(s) 5. Safety/Security
  23. 23. Am I…? Dysfunctional • Burnt out • Territorial • Bitter • Gruff • Sarcastic/Disrespectful • Secretive/Lonely • Aloof • Frazzled • Hyperemotional • Cold • Controlling • Too Accommodating/Demanding • Absentminded/Overcommitted • TAKING IT ALL TOO PERSONALLY Efficient • Eager • Collaborative • Friendly • Available • Confident • Reasonable • Willing to delegate • Assertive (not aggressive) • Considerate of My Own Schedule and That of Others • “With It” • Keeping The Job In Perspective
  24. 24. Increasing Efficiency is Decreasing Dysfunction EMOTIONAL • Never discount the impact of your emotional state* • Never discount the impact of your co-worker’s emotional state* • Speak up/ask if you are concerned—BE HUMAN • Know your interpersonal rights and assert them—don’t be bullied • Know the rights of others and don’t violate them—don’t be a bully • Report interpersonal issues to a supervisor IF YOU CANNOT WORK THEM OUT FOR YOURSELF • If you MUST criticize, direct criticism to its target in a civil and responsible way and offer advice; don’t gossip • Keep your temper, be respectful • Accept compromise (be an adult) • HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR! * “The contagion of incivility”
  25. 25. Increasing Efficiency is Decreasing Dysfunction TECHNICAL/TECHNOLOGICAL • Assess your training. Is it adequate? If not, say so. • Are machinery/computer issues in the way of premium performance? If so, put it in writing. Offer a solution, if you can. • Identify problems technology could possibly solve • Identify problems technology is causing • Be patient
  26. 26. Increasing Efficiency is Decreasing Dysfunction OPERATIONAL • Give honest evaluations using constructive language (communicate) • Never complain without offering a solution—assume the follow- up question: “What can be done about it?” and offer the answer • CLEARLY assign tasks AND deadlines at the same time—avoid micromanagement (Bird-dog, don’t hound) • Respect the contract, written and unwritten • Speak up when you feel your training is lacking • Point out problems in a timely manner using the chain of command • Take responsibility, volunteer, say “YES” • Set deadlines for committee issues • Ask “why” something is the way it is if you don’t understand
  27. 27. Efficiency vs. Effectiveness “Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.” —P. Drucker Are we doing the right things?
  28. 28. The Seven Stinkbugs And How To Deal 1.The Whiner 2.The Know-It-All 3.The Town Crier 4.The Underminer 5.The Office Bully 6. Eeyore/Debbie Downer 7.The Ninja
  29. 29. The Whiner Feels: Discomfort and Frustration Lacks: Filter Discusses: Their immediate emotional state and what/who is causing it. Blames: Others. Best Handled by: Limitations. Insist on suggested solutions (in writing?) for every complaint. Assign the implementation of suggestions when possible. Deadlines and consequences.
  30. 30. The Know It All Feels: Insecurity (or a genuine sense of superiority) Lacks: Self-awareness Discusses: What others are doing wrong and how it should be done. Blames: Others. Best Handled By: Strategic ignoring. Probing questions. Assignment of responsibilities and deadlines.
  31. 31. The Town Crier Feels: Unimportant, Powerless, Lacking Attention Lacks: Empathy Discusses: The behavior and flaws of other people. Blames: Whoever they are talking about. Best Handled By: A good example, first and foremost. Assess the possible legal impact of their behavior and directly confront the gossiper about the unacceptable nature of their behavior in a timely manner. Give deadlines for change, document the discussion, be prepared to discipline.
  32. 32. The Underminer Feels: Frustrated at Status, Resentment of Authority Lacks: Insight Discusses: How “The Man” (YOU) is keeping everyone down/screwing everything up. Blames: Higher-Ups Best Handled By: Confirming suspicions with witnesses, Documenting specific instances. Clearly explain to the employee the organization’s goals, mission and values. Describe how the specific incidents you documented undermine the basic tenets of the company. Explain the negative effects that resulted from each situation. Discuss what changes the employee must make for him and the organization to succeed.
  33. 33. The Bully Feels: Compulsive need for dominance and control to further a strictly PERSONAL agenda Lacks: Empathy/Social Conscience Discusses: Whatever they want, as long as they can harass, intimidate, exploit and insult you or someone else while they do it. Blames: Whoever is weaker, lower in the organization and less confrontational than they are. Best Handled By: Direct, firm, rapid confrontation about specific instances of bullying behavior. Team up on the bully. Because bullies often act in such a way that they are difficult to catch while in the act, a general discussion of the organization’s values—and the consequences for violating them—is often a good starting point for addressing their behavior. Be sure your entire staff knows that the administration takes bullying seriously and will not tolerate it.
  34. 34. Eeyore/Debbie Downer Feels: Low motivation, high frustration Lacks: Perspective Discusses: How and why whatever project might be going on will lead to problems and/or failure. Blames: Whatever is convenient, including themselves Best Handled By: • Perspective—is the employee an essential element of balance? • Seeking out the source of the pessimism—why do they think as they do? History? • Explaining to the employee how their comments and attitude are perceived and how they affect the attitudes and productivity of the organization. • Using peer pressure and firmly setting group expectations to help regulate the behavior. • Insist on suggested solutions (in writing?) for every complaint.
  35. 35. The Ninja Feels: Frustration at status, resentment of authority, need for power and control Lacks: Forthrightness (Is Two-Faced) Discusses: What you want to hear (to your face), why you are incompetent (behind your back). Blames: Whoever/whatever they perceive the audience will agree with—but mostly the boss. Best Handled By: Direct confrontation and disclosure of awareness. Ninjas prefer to work in secrecy and will often adjust behavior when they are aware that they have been detected and are being watched.
  36. 36. 1. Share your observations—Tell the employee what you/your team have seen without offering judgment “Gloria, I have gotten several reports from staff that you discuss your coworkers in such a way that they feel it is a distraction and bad for team morale.” Dr. Marie McIntyre’s Five Steps of Coaching Behavior
  37. 37. Dr. Marie McIntyre’s Five Steps of Coaching Behavior 1. Share your observations—Tell the employee what you/your team have seen without offering judgment “Gloria, I have gotten several reports from staff that you discuss your coworkers in such a way that they feel it is a distraction and bad for team morale.” 2. Explain why change is needed—Tell the employee why what you have observed must change without offering judgment “Being talked about can cause co-workers to feel that they are being disrespected and can cause distrust, and co-worker distrust is bad for morale and creates a difficult work environment.”
  38. 38. 3. Discuss Causes and Barriers—Here the employee can explain/offer excuses/try to pass blame, etc. Listen as carefully, calmly and objectively as possible. This is a discussion, not a reprimand. Be careful not to be sidetracked or talked out of your course of action. Dr. Marie McIntyre’s Five Steps of Coaching Behavior
  39. 39. Dr. Marie McIntyre’s Five Steps of Coaching Behavior 3. Discuss Causes and Barriers—Here the employee can explain/offer excuses/try to pass blame, etc. Listen as carefully, calmly and objectively as possible. This is a discussion, not a reprimand. Be careful not to be sidetracked or talked out of your course of action. 4. Agree on Strategies for Change— The employee must be allowed to be in control of the improvements you need her to make. Allow them to tell YOU what they can do to fix the situation as much as possible. “You say you think your behavior has been misjudged. What do you think you can do to change the perception that you are gossiping?”
  40. 40. 5. Provide Ongoing Feedback—This is to let the employee know that you not only continue to monitor their behavior, but that you notice if and when it improves/returns. “While I was down here I just wanted to say I appreciate you taking the talk we had last month seriously. I haven’t heard any reports of the issue from anyone since. Thank you.” Dr. Marie McIntyre’s Five Steps of Coaching Behavior
  41. 41. Document, Document, Document Find out if your city or departmental HR department has forms for documenting disciplinary/coaching discussions. If so, make it a point to use them. If not, remember to immediately document discussions according to these elements: 1. What the acceptable standards of performance are. 2. How the employee failed to meet those standards. 3. The HIGHLIGHTS of the corrective discussion you had with him/her including the SPECIFIC STEPS they must take to improve. 4. The timeline for improvement. 5. The employee’s response and SIGNATURE.
  42. 42. Document,Document, Document
  43. 43. Recommended Reading http://yourofficecoach.com http://theworkplacetherapist.com The No-A**hole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace or Surviving One That Isn’t by Robert I. Sutton, Ph.D. http://bobsutton.typepad.com The Bully at Work: What You Can Do to Stop the Hurt and Reclaim Your Dignity on the Job by Gary and Ruth Namie Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman Emotional Vampires: Dealing With People Who Drain You Dry by Albert Bernstein The Gentle Art of Verbal Self-Defense at Work by Suzette Elgin, Ph.D. Great by Choice by Jim Collins and Morten Hansen The Great Workplace: How to Build it, How to Keep It and Why it Matters by Michael Burchell and Jennifer Robin Teaming Up: Making the Transition to a Self-Directed Team-Based Organization by Darrel Ray & Howard Bronstein

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