Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

UX Design for the learning experience

A quick look at 9 design strategies for Learning Experiences. How to support both the cognitive and emotional sides of learning as well as design and measure for learning impact. For UX/UI designers.

  • Identifiez-vous pour voir les commentaires

UX Design for the learning experience

  1. 1. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 1 Design for the Learning Experience Positive Computing Lab Brain and Mind Centre Sydney School of Education & Social Work University of Sydney Dorian Peters
  2. 2. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 2 What kinds of learning experiences do you design for? Schools/children University/TAFE Workplace Consumer learning/ learnability ?
  3. 3. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 3 UX for Learning (v. “normal” UX) Design for the cognitive side of learning Design for the emotional side of learning Measure success via learning objectives
  4. 4. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 4 UX for Learning (v. “normal” UX) Design for the cognitive side of learning Design for the emotional side of learning Measure success via learning objectives
  5. 5. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 5 UX for Learning (v. “normal” UX) Design for the cognitive side of learning Design for the emotional side of learning Measure success via learning objectives
  6. 6. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 6 UX for Learning (v. “normal” UX) Design for the cognitive side of learning Design for the emotional side of learning Measure success via learning objectives
  7. 7. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 7 Design for the cognitive side of learning 1 – Reduce Extraneous Cognitive Load – Design for Timely Feedback – Target the media to the learning
  8. 8. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 8 1. Reduce Extraneous Cognitive Load Research says… – Adding interesting but unnecessary extras can harm learning. – Overuse of colour decreases performance on memory tasks. – Avoid elements that don’t directly support the learning objective. sounds graphics animations colours Learning Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2008).E-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning.Elearning (Vol.2).Pfeiffer.
  9. 9. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 9 Simplify visuals or make them abstract. Other ways to reduce load & support cognition… Research shows that we recognize a line drawing of an object as fast as a realistic photo and we remember the drawing better. Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2008).E-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning.Elearning (Vol.2).Pfeiffer.
  10. 10. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 10 Other ways to reduce load & support cognition… Don’t separate related text and visuals. Research shows placing text next to the image to which it refers improves learning outcomes. Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2008).E-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning.Elearning (Vol.2).Pfeiffer.
  11. 11. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 11 Thyroid a large ductless gland in the neck which secretes hormones regulatinggrowth and development throughthe rate of metabolism. Other ways to reduce load & support cognition… Don’t separate related text and visuals.
  12. 12. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 12 – Design to allow for the provision of both operational and rich instructional feedback. – Place feedback near its related item – Trigger feedback instantaneously when possible. ✔ Correct! The minimalist design allows users to focus on their task. ✔ Correct! The minimalist design allows users to focus on their task. 2. Design for Timely Feedback
  13. 13. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 13 Research demonstrates that people learn motor skills better with video or animation Wong, A. et al. 2009.“Instructional Animations Can Be Superior to Statics When Learning Human Motor Skills.” Computers in Human Behavior 25(2):339–47 Animation & video are great for physical procedures 3. Target the media to the learning
  14. 14. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 14 – Practice Dangerous things first-hand (Defusing a bomb, surgery, work with radioactivity, etc.) – Experience inaccessible things first-hand (Historical time periods, distant locations) – Experience things out of scale (like an atom or the solar system) – Make decisions, experience consequences (control the action and experience realistic consequences; intrinsic feedback) IMPORTANT: In order for learners to transfer their learning to the real world the virtual setting should mimic the real one (include real-world cues). (ie. don’t set your corporate skills training on an alien planet even if it’s cool). When to consider virtual worlds… VR & simulated environments can be great for: Mikropoulos,T.A., & Natsis,A. (2011).Educational virtual environments:A ten-year review of empirical research (1999–2009). Computers & Education,56(3), 769–780.http://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.10.020
  15. 15. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 15 Design for the emotional side of learning – Support a positive mood – Support social presence – Support “good” motivation
  16. 16. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 16 1. Support a Positive Mood Norman, Donald A. 2005. Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things. Basic Books – Positive emotion increases our ability to be thorough, flexible and creative in problem solving, and it improves learning – “Positive emotions are critical to learning, curiosity and creative thought” – Don Norman Positive Emotions = Better Learning
  17. 17. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 17 – Don’t stress out your learners. (avoid timers, highly negative cues, signs of surveillance) – Keep your design friendly & forgiving (a safe place to experiment, make mistakes and retry) – Include delighters (Just do so sparingly, don’t interrupt the learning with them, and test your ideas on your users first.) Staying positive…
  18. 18. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 18 2. Support Social Presence Social Presence = Better Learning Moreno,R., & Mayer, R. E. (2000).Engaging students in active learning:The case for personalized multimedia messages.Journal of educational psychology,92(4),724. Writing in a first person conversational tone improves learning.
  19. 19. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 19 2. Support Social Presence Positive Emotions = Better Learning
  20. 20. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 20 3. Support “Good” Motivation Effective engagement comes from motivation that is… Intrinsic to the task (eg. I do it because I love it) Ryan, R., & Deci, E. (2000). Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations: Classic Definitions and New Directions. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25(1), 54–67. OR Intrinsic to being human (autonomous extrinsic) (eg. I do it because it connects me with others, increases my sense of mastery, helps me achieve my goals and values. Tap into meaning.
  21. 21. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 21 Interface Design & Motivation Example: Styling like a race primes learners to value speed, efficiency and competition, while styling it like an adventure could call on an inherent love of story and character. Use aesthetics to tap into meaningfulmotivators for the topic
  22. 22. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 22 Interface Design & Motivation Example: Styling like a race primes learners to value speed, efficiency and competition, while styling it like an adventure could call on an inherent love of story and character. Use aesthetics to tap into meaningfulmotivators for the topic
  23. 23. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 23 Measure success via learning objectives – Set learning objectives – Align design and media to those objectives – Assess for those objectives
  24. 24. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 24 XXX Anatomy of a learning objective By the end of the experience the learner will be able to… know understand believe
  25. 25. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 25 Anatomy of a learning objective Be able to what? What do we mean by “learn”
  26. 26. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 26 Anatomy of a learning objective Bloom’s Taxonomy… Remember Understand Apply Analyse Evaluate Create What do we mean by “learn”
  27. 27. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 27 Anatomy of a learning objective REMEMBER UNDERSTAND APPLY ANALYSE EVALUATE CREATE IDENTIFY EXPLAIN DEMONSTRATE DEVELOP COMPARE DESIGN RECOGNISE INTERPRET USE DIFFERENTIATE MEASURE CONSTRUCT DEFINE CLASSIFY ILLUSTRATE CATEGORISE CRITIQUE COMPOSE SELECT DESCRIBE INTERPRET DISTINGUISH INTERPRET PRODUCE Learning types & verbs
  28. 28. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 28 Start with a quality Learning Objective Learning Activity How will they learn? learning objective What should they be able to do? Assessment “How will we know they have learned?” 1 2 3 “By the end of the lesson the learner will be able to demonstrate a Tango 8-step”
  29. 29. Dorian Peters (dorian-peters.com) - UX Australia, August 2017 29 Delve Deeper: Interface Design for Learning Design Strategies for Learning Experiences Thank you. @Dorian_Peters

×