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Who is the Nanotechnology Economy?
Obstacles and Methods of Identifying and
Estimates of U.S. Nano Firms & Workers
Stacey ...
Goals & Obstacles
 Goal/Objective: Track and measure economic, social and/or
environmental impacts related to nanotechnol...
Value Chain Analysis -> Life Cycle Assessment
 Value chain: activities firms and workers do
in the process of creating a ...
Basic Nano Value Chain Model Overview
Layers: 120+
Stages: 5
Sectors: 27
Subsectors: 91
Supporting
Organizations
Firms /
S...
Multi-Wall
Carbon
Nanotubes
(MWNT)
Powder
Raw Materials/
Nanoscale Materials
Intermediate
Nano Products
Coatings
Composite...
Semi-Metallic
Quantum Dots
Nanoscale
Intermediates Nano-Enabled Product
Nanoscale
Materials
Component
Products
Electronic
...
Strategy 1: Firms/Organizations ->Workers
Broad Focused
 Identify firms
 Find total number of workers
employed by firms ...
Strategy 1: Identify Firms
Data & Methods to Identify Firms and Metrics
Research
Design &
Development
Manufacturing
Logist...
Strategy 1: Data Collection & Estimate Model
Existing Metrics/Statistics
 Lux, BCC, F&S, NSF, etc.
Firm-Level Nano Datase...
Strategy 1: Initial Results
 Firms & Organizations
 Locations: 2,125
 Employment:
 Total: 446,900
 Share (10-50%): 52...
Strategy 2: Workers->Firms
 Companies and people can
select “nanotechnology” as
industry on LinkedIn
 People:
 Global: ...
Strategy 3: Education->Workers->Firms
Identifying potential “supply” (in-progress)
 Identified U.S. education
nano-relate...
U.S. Nano Workforce Estimates (2010-13)
United States: Existing Estimate (2010)+: 220,000
Preliminary estimates based on p...
Application of Data for EHS
Frederick (2013); based on data from California in the Nano Economy.
California in the Nano Economy
www.CaliforniaNanoEconomy.org
 Industry and education-focused website for the nano communi...
Value Chain Section
Educational
 Click boxes for detailed info
 Forward & backward linkages
 Important global firms &
o...
Firm & Organization Data
 Location Pages (Fig. 1)
 Physical Location & Basic Info
 Value Chain Mapping
 Products
 Pro...
Summary
 Ability to measure and track impacts of nano
(environment, social, economic) depends on ability to
identify key ...
Thank you!
Stacey Frederick
stacey.frederick@duke.edu
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Who is the Nanotechnology Economy? Obstacles and Methods of Identifying and Estimates of U.S. Nano Firms & Workers

Presentation from Stacey Frederick presented on November 2013 at the Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization Conference.

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Who is the Nanotechnology Economy? Obstacles and Methods of Identifying and Estimates of U.S. Nano Firms & Workers

  1. 1. Who is the Nanotechnology Economy? Obstacles and Methods of Identifying and Estimates of U.S. Nano Firms & Workers Stacey Frederick, Research Scientist Center on Globalization, Governance & Competitiveness (CGGC), Duke University Center for Nanotechnology in Society, UC-Santa Barbara SNO Meeting: Santa Barbara, CA November 4, 2013
  2. 2. Goals & Obstacles  Goal/Objective: Track and measure economic, social and/or environmental impacts related to nanotechnology.  Positive: return on investment, job creation, revenue generation, energy efficiency  Negative: exposure & risk  Common key variables: firms, workers, products & geography  Obstacles:  Nanotechnology is not an industry; it enables developments in all industries in different ways  U.S. firms are not required to disclose activities on nanoscale  No centralized effort to collect nano firm/product/worker data  No firm or product classification  Need to track developments along the entire value chain
  3. 3. Value Chain Analysis -> Life Cycle Assessment  Value chain: activities firms and workers do in the process of creating a product/service  Physical alterations (supply chain) + activities that add value (research, branding, services)  Six main activities – need to identify firms in each stage performing each activity Research Design & Development Manufacturing Logistics & Distribution Marketing & Retail Services Components Retail & Sales Raw Materials/ Inputs Final Products LCA Value-Adding Activities Final Products/ Sales Raw Materials/ Inputs Supply Chain Value chain, supply chain, production network, life cycle analysis – different research questions, rely on same data
  4. 4. Basic Nano Value Chain Model Overview Layers: 120+ Stages: 5 Sectors: 27 Subsectors: 91 Supporting Organizations Firms / Supply Chain Value-Adding Activities
  5. 5. Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWNT) Powder Raw Materials/ Nanoscale Materials Intermediate Nano Products Coatings Composites Nano-Enabled Final Products Sporting Goods Electronics Transportation Carbon Epoxy Matrix Energy Storage Devices Anode/Cathode: carbon black substitute Fuel Cells Super-capacitor Fuel Systems Body Parts, Hull Baseball Bat Hockey Stick Lithium-Ion Batteries Golf Club Bicycle Yachts & Sailboat Speed Boats Casing/Packaging Energy Anti-Static Value Chain Mapping Example: MWNT Applications Pre-Processing/ Formulators Nano-Enabled Component Products Renewable Ethanol Carbon Gas Catalyst Wind TurbineWind Turbine Blade Mast Handle Bar, Fork, Stem Shaft Skateboard Surfboard Hunting Arrow Skis & Poles Racquet Chemicals Epoxide Resin Hardener Cell Phone Semiconductors integrated circuits; chips Computer Car Airplane Conductive Paste Paint for Exterior Parts Other Masterbatch Pellets or Liquid Fiber-Reinforced: Thermoset Thermoplastic AdhesivesThermoplastic Polymer Compounder Paint & Ink Conductive Conductive Epoxy Thermoset Resin Water Soluble Anti-Fouling Coating Ships
  6. 6. Semi-Metallic Quantum Dots Nanoscale Intermediates Nano-Enabled Product Nanoscale Materials Component Products Electronic Subassemblies: Display Consumer Electronics Tablets & E-Readers LG Display LCD Coatings & Ink Nanoparticulate Film 3M™ QD Enhancement Film Nanosys QD Concentrate™ Amazon Kindle Fire HDX Foxconn California, USA 100 employees Marketing/Sales: B2C Minnesota, USA South Korea $60 (prior to QD) China/Asia Washington, USA $229 Value Chain Mapping Example Quantum Dots in Displays End-User/ Disposal Publicly discuss collaboration; mention quantum dots; no change to mfg. process; improves color; more energy efficient “Perfect color” ManufacturingManufacturingR&D, Manufacturing Marketing: B2B Geography Firms Products Activities Red: negative exposure & risk Green: positive benefits ClaimsNo claims
  7. 7. Strategy 1: Firms/Organizations ->Workers Broad Focused  Identify firms  Find total number of workers employed by firms and organizations purportedly engaged in some degree of nano-related development by location  Estimate ‘nano’ portion of total employment  Based on degree a stakeholder appears to be focused on nano- related activities  Apply percentages to total employment  Nano-specific: 100%  Partial or Micro/Nano: 10- 50%  Subjective, yet important step towards more accurate estimates
  8. 8. Strategy 1: Identify Firms Data & Methods to Identify Firms and Metrics Research Design & Development Manufacturing Logistics & Distribution Marketing & Retail Services Publications Patents Government Funding Expert Opinion Statistics Firm-Level Reports & Directories Often one-time efforts * Limited scope (geography, activities or supply chain) * Several lack a methodology Only capture a subset of value-adding activities Lack supporting methodology & dataset Firm-Level Reports & Directories Firm-Level Reports & Directories Industry , Worker & Product Classification Codes (NAICS, SOC, HS, etc.) Do not exist for nanotechnology
  9. 9. Strategy 1: Data Collection & Estimate Model Existing Metrics/Statistics  Lux, BCC, F&S, NSF, etc. Firm-Level Nano Datasets  Web-Based Directories  Nanowerk, NSTI, NanoVIP, InterNano  Research Projects, Reports & Journal Articles  Woodrow Wilson Center, CADTSC, Lux  Conference Attendees & Presenters R&D Datasets  Publications & Patents  Funding Sources  Government & Private Business Data Sources  Dun & Bradstreet  Government Statistics  LinkedIn  Company Websites  Market Reports (1) Compile/verify existing info (3) Add general business info; develop non-nano value chain maps Key variable: employment (2) Add new companies & provide R&D details (4) Compare results to existing estimates (5) Continue search for new sources; maintain & update info
  10. 10. Strategy 1: Initial Results  Firms & Organizations  Locations: 2,125  Employment:  Total: 446,900  Share (10-50%): 52,200-224,200  Shortcomings/Findings:  Employment at nano-specific companies low (~2% overall)  Top five states (CA, MA, NY, TX & PA): ~50% of U.S. firm locations and total employment  Next Steps  Refine focus areas using subsequent strategies & primary research  Primary data; focus on states with largest shares of firms/workers  Long term: produce data useful for classification development; potential micro-data project  Firms->Classification Codes: top three NAICS codes at three-digit level: 60% of all firms  Computer & Electronic Product Mfg. (NAICS 334): 23%  Professional, Scientific & Technical Services (NAICS 541): 23%  Chemical Mfg. (NAICS 325): 15%
  11. 11. Strategy 2: Workers->Firms  Companies and people can select “nanotechnology” as industry on LinkedIn  People:  Global: 105,390  USA: 24,800  California: 5,060  Companies  Global: 1,353  USA: 389  California: 77  Shortcomings/Findings:  Likely underrepresents manufacturing  “Noise” – fake profiles  Benefit of being self-reported  Next Steps  Collect data on occupations  Identify shares of nano employees at firms to help refine focused employment estimates  Add new companies to track People & companies selecting “nanotechnology” as their industry on LinkedIn : October 16, 2013
  12. 12. Strategy 3: Education->Workers->Firms Identifying potential “supply” (in-progress)  Identified U.S. education nano-related programs  Community college & universities: 88 programs  50 degree programs & 38 minors/concentrations  Identify students engaging in nano-related research  Search U.S. dissertations for nano-related terms  1997-2009: 4,800 people+  Next Steps  Survey of programs to get number of graduates  Update dissertation data through 2012  Track students into the workforce + Walsh & Ridge (2012). Knowledge production and nanotechnology: Characterizing American dissertation research, 1999-2009. Technology in Society (34), 127-137.
  13. 13. U.S. Nano Workforce Estimates (2010-13) United States: Existing Estimate (2010)+: 220,000 Preliminary estimates based on presented methods: 1) Upper: (all locations, all employees): 446,900  Focused (~50%): 224,200  Focused (~25%): 116,700  Focused (~10%): 52,200 2) Lower(LinkedIn): 24,800 3) Potential “supply”: 4,800 + graduates (TBD) + Roco. (2012, March 28). Nanotechnology Research Directions for Societal Needs in 2020. OECD/NNI Int’l Symposium on Assessing the Economic Impact of Nano, Washington, DC.  Focus so far has primarily been on methodology and database development  Numbers represent people potentially employed due to nanotechnology; not the number of people that will come into contact with nanomaterials
  14. 14. Application of Data for EHS Frederick (2013); based on data from California in the Nano Economy.
  15. 15. California in the Nano Economy www.CaliforniaNanoEconomy.org  Industry and education-focused website for the nano community  Presents California's footprint in nanotechnology  Interactive, web-based application of a value chain research approach Main Areas  Firms & Products  Value Chain Mapping  Education and Workforce Development Programs  Public Policy and Economic Development Initiatives Center on Globalization, Governance, & Competitiveness (CGGC) at Duke University Center for Nanotechnology in Society at UC-Santa Barbara
  16. 16. Value Chain Section Educational  Click boxes for detailed info  Forward & backward linkages  Important global firms & organizations  Manufacturing methods  California locations  Interactive value chain diagram  Hover cursor over boxes for description & stats
  17. 17. Firm & Organization Data  Location Pages (Fig. 1)  Physical Location & Basic Info  Value Chain Mapping  Products  Profile Pages: 100+ more-detailed profiles of firms & organizations  Company Overview  Buyers , Suppliers & Strategic Partners  Innovation & Technology Fig. 1: Example Location Page on California in the Nano Economy Website Fig. 2: Interactive Geographic Maps of Nano-Related Firms & Organizations  Maps: interactive, geographic maps of locations by key variables (Fig. 2)
  18. 18. Summary  Ability to measure and track impacts of nano (environment, social, economic) depends on ability to identify key actors: firms, workers & geography  Same data central to research questions from various groups; different terms, same fundamental ideas  Complex process for nano but enough data exists to begin the process  Focus of this research is to begin to put the necessary pieces together and make information available for multiple uses
  19. 19. Thank you! Stacey Frederick stacey.frederick@duke.edu

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