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Tutorials mep metenu

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In this lesson, you learn how to use the Revit MEP tutorials, including where to find the training files and
how to create a new Revit MEP project from a template file.
The Contents tab of the Revit MEP Tutorials window displays the available tutorial titles. Expand a title for
a list of lessons in the tutorial. Expand a lesson title for a list of exercises in the lesson.

Publié dans : Logiciels
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Tutorials mep metenu

  1. 1. Revit MEP Metric Tutorial April 2008
  2. 2. © 2008 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Except as otherwise permitted by Autodesk, Inc., this publication, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form, by any method, for any purpose. Certain materials included in this publication are reprinted with the permission of the copyright holder. Disclaimer THIS PUBLICATION AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS MADE AVAILABLE BY AUTODESK, INC. "AS IS." AUTODESK, INC. DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE REGARDING THESE MATERIALS. Trademarks The following are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., in the USA and other countries: 3DEC (design/logo), 3December, 3December.com, 3ds Max, ActiveShapes, Actrix, ADI, Alias, Alias (swirl design/logo), AliasStudio, Alias|Wavefront (design/logo), ATC, AUGI, AutoCAD, AutoCAD Learning Assistance, AutoCAD LT, AutoCAD Simulator, AutoCAD SQL Extension, AutoCAD SQL Interface, Autodesk, Autodesk Envision, Autodesk Insight, Autodesk Intent, Autodesk Inventor, Autodesk Map, Autodesk MapGuide, Autodesk Streamline, AutoLISP, AutoSnap, AutoSketch, AutoTrack, Backdraft, Built with ObjectARX (logo), Burn, Buzzsaw, CAiCE, Can You Imagine, Character Studio, Cinestream, Civil 3D, Cleaner, Cleaner Central, ClearScale, Colour Warper, Combustion, Communication Specification, Constructware, Content Explorer, Create>what's>Next> (design/logo), Dancing Baby (image), DesignCenter, Design Doctor, Designer's Toolkit, DesignKids, DesignProf, DesignServer, DesignStudio, Design|Studio (design/logo), Design Your World, Design Your World (design/logo), DWF, DWG, DWG (logo), DWG TrueConvert, DWG TrueView, DXF, EditDV, Education by Design, Exposure, Extending the Design Team, FBX, Filmbox, FMDesktop, Freewheel, GDX Driver, Gmax, Heads-up Design, Heidi, HOOPS, HumanIK, i-drop, iMOUT, Incinerator, IntroDV, Inventor, Inventor LT, Kaydara, Kaydara (design/logo), LocationLogic, Lustre, Maya, Mechanical Desktop, MotionBuilder, Mudbox, NavisWorks, ObjectARX, ObjectDBX, Open Reality, Opticore, Opticore Opus, PolarSnap, PortfolioWall, Powered with Autodesk Technology, Productstream, ProjectPoint, ProMaterials, Reactor, RealDWG, Real-time Roto, Recognize, Render Queue, Reveal, Revit, Showcase, ShowMotion, SketchBook, SteeringWheels, StudioTools, Topobase, Toxik, ViewCube, Visual, Visual Bridge, Visual Construction, Visual Drainage, Visual Hydro, Visual Landscape, Visual Roads, Visual Survey, Visual Syllabus, Visual Toolbox, Visual Tugboat, Visual LISP, Voice Reality, Volo, Wiretap, and WiretapCentral The following are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk Canada Co. in the USA and/or Canada and other countries: Backburner, Discreet, Fire, Flame, Flint, Frost, Inferno, Multi-Master Editing, River, Smoke, Sparks, Stone, and Wire All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Third Party Software Program Credits ACIS Copyright© 1989-2001 Spatial Corp. Portions Copyright© 2002 Autodesk, Inc. Flash ® is a registered trademark of Macromedia, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. International CorrectSpell™ Spelling Correction System© 1995 by Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products, N.V. All rights reserved. InstallShield™ 3.0. Copyright© 1997 InstallShield Software Corporation. All rights reserved. PANTONE® Colors displayed in the software application or in the user documentation may not match PANTONE-identified standards. Consult current PANTONE Color Publications for accurate color. PANTONE Color Data and/or Software shall not be copied onto another disk or into memory unless as part of the execution of this Autodesk software product. Portions Copyright© 1991-1996 Arthur D. Applegate. All rights reserved. Portions of this software are based on the work of the Independent JPEG Group. RAL DESIGN© RAL, Sankt Augustin, 2002 RAL CLASSIC© RAL, Sankt Augustin, 2002 Representation of the RAL Colors is done with the approval of RAL Deutsches Institut für Gütesicherung und Kennzeichnung e.V. (RAL German Institute for Quality Assurance and Certification, re. Assoc.), D-53757 Sankt Augustin. Typefaces from the Bitstream® typeface library copyright 1992. Typefaces from Payne Loving Trust© 1996. All rights reserved. Printed manual and help produced with Idiom WorldServer™. WindowBlinds: DirectSkin™ OCX © Stardock® AnswerWorks 4.0 ©; 1997-2003 WexTech Systems, Inc. Portions of this software © Vantage-Knexys. All rights reserved. The Director General of the Geographic Survey Institute has issued the approval for the coordinates exchange numbered TKY2JGD for Japan Geodetic Datum 2000, also known as technical information No H1-N0.2 of the Geographic Survey Institute, to be installed and used within this software product (Approval No.: 646 issued by GSI, April 8, 2002). Portions of this computer program are copyright © 1995-1999 LizardTech, Inc. All rights reserved. MrSID is protected by U.S. Patent No. 5,710,835. Foreign Patents Pending. Portions of this computer program are Copyright ©; 2000 Earth Resource Mapping, Inc. OSTN97 © Crown Copyright 1997. All rights reserved. OSTN02 © Crown copyright 2002. All rights reserved. OSGM02 © Crown copyright 2002, © Ordnance Survey Ireland, 2002. FME Objects Engine © 2005 SAFE Software. All rights reserved. ETABS is a registered trademark of Computers and Structures, Inc. ETABS © copyright 1984-2005 Computers and Structures, Inc. All rights reserved. RISA is a trademark of RISA Technologies. RISA-3D copyright © 1993-2005 RISA Technologies. All rights reserved.
  3. 3. Portions relating to JPEG © Copyright 1991-1998 Thomas G. Lane. All rights reserved. This software is based in part on the work of the Independent JPEG Group. Portions relating to TIFF © Copyright 1997-1998 Sam Leffler. © Copyright 1991-1997 Silicon Graphics, Inc. All rights reserved. The Tiff portions of this software are provided by the copyright holders and contributors “as is” and any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties or merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed. In no event shall the copyright owner or contributors of the TIFF portions be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption) however caused and on any theory of liability, whether in contract, strict liability, or tort (including negligence or otherwise) arising in any way out of the use of the TIFF portions of this software, even if advised of the possibility of such damage. Portions of Libtiff 3.5.7 Copyright © 1988-1997 Sam Leffler. Copyright © 1991-1997 Silicon Graphics, Inc. Permission to use, copy, modify, distribute, and sell this software and its documentation for any purpose is hereby granted without fee, provided that (i) the above copyright notices and this permission notice appear in all copies of the software and related documentation, and (ii) the names of Sam Leffler and Silicon Graphics may not be used in any advertising or publicity relating to the software without the specific, prior written permission of Sam Leffler and Silicon Graphics. Portions of Libxml2 2.6.4 Copyright © 1998-2003 Daniel Veillard. All Rights Reserved. Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions: The above copyright notices and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software. Government Use Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in FAR 12.212 (Commercial Computer Software-Restricted Rights) and DFAR 227.7202 (Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software), as applicable.
  4. 4. Contents Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Using the Tutorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Accessing Training Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Understanding the Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Navigating the User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Express Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Chapter 2 Express Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Creating a Supply Air System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Creating a Secondary Supply Air System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Creating Ductwork for the Secondary Supply Air System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Creating the Primary System Ductwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Adding the Primary System Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Inspecting and Color Coding the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Creating Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Creating Lighting Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Creating Switch Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Tagging Lighting Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Creating Power Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Balancing Electrical Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Developing Your MEP Designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Chapter 3 Mechanical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Planning Mechanical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 v
  5. 5. Placing Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Creating Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Assigning a Color Scheme to Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Performing a Heating and Cooling Loads Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Chapter 4 Mechanical Systems: Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Designing Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Placing Air Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Using a Schedule as an Air Systems Design Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Using Views to Validate Duct Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Drawing the Primary Supply Air Duct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Sizing the Primary Duct: Velocity Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Assigning a Color Scheme to Duct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Sizing the Secondary Air System Duct: Equal Friction Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Inspecting Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Placing Air Conditioning Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Completing the Supply Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Checking Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Chapter 5 Mechanical Systems: Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Designing Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Creating Piping Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Placing Radiators and a Boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Creating the Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Creating Pipe Runs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Resolving Pipe Interference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Connecting the Boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Sizing the Pipe Runs: Friction & Velocity Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Placing Circulator Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Inspecting Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 Checking Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Chapter 6 Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 Planning Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 Preparing the Electrical Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 Defining Required Lighting Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 Assigning Space Color Fills According to Required Lighting Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 Creating a Space Schedule to Check Required Lighting Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 Designing the Electrical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Adding Lighting Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Placing Lighting Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Placing Power Receptacles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Creating Power & Lighting Usage Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Placing Electrical Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Creating Power Circuitry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Creating Lighting Circuitry and Wires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Creating Switch Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 Creating Multi-Circuit Wire Runs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 Checking Your Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 Defining Circuit Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 Chapter 7 Plumbing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341 Planning Plumbing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 Preparing the Plumbing Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 Configuring Plumbing and Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 Designing Plumbing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344 vi | Contents
  6. 6. Add Plumbing Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344 Begin Creating the Sanitary System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 Refining the Sanitary Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369 Refining the Urinal Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373 Adding Vents to the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Create the Cold Water System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 Create the Hot Water System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Designing Fire Protection Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Starting the Fire Protection Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Placing Sprinklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 Connecting the Sprinklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427 Completing the Fire Protection Wet System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 Creating the Fire Protection Dry System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446 Modifying Pipe Diameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452 Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 Modifying Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464 Modifying a Fan Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464 Modifying Fan Powered VAV Box with Electric Heat Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469 Modifying Electrical Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477 Modifying a Water Closet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482 Modifying a Diffuser Annotation Tag Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 485 Modifying a Light Fixture Annotation Tag Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487 Creating Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 Creating a Light Fixture Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 Flange Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502 Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512 Creating an Annotation Symbol Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548 Revit MEP Family Editor Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555 Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555 Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562 Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562 Lookup Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562 Parameter Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563 Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Light Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 Part Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 Documenting Your Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Chapter 10 Adding Views and Sheets to a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Creating Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Duplicating Plan Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Creating Elevation and Section Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Creating Callout Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 582 Modifying View Tag Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 588 Setting Visibility and Graphics Options in Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591 Creating a View Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592 View Range and Plan Regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595 Using Filters to Control Visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 Masking Portions of a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 Working with Visual Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603 Creating Drawing Sheets in a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 608 Creating Drawing Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 608 Contents | vii
  7. 7. Adding Views to Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 612 Modifying the Building Model from a Sheet View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617 Creating and Modifying a Title Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 618 Chapter 11 Tagging and Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 623 Tagging Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 623 Sequentially Placing and Tagging Rooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 623 Tagging Doors and Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 629 Tagging Other Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 633 Defining Schedules and Color Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636 Creating a Window Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637 Adding Project Parameters to a Window Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 642 Creating a Unit-Based Door Schedule with a Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 644 Creating a Room Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646 Scheduling Rooms from a Program List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 648 Creating a Room Color Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 654 Creating a Material Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 662 Scheduling Shared Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 665 Creating a Shared Parameter File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 665 Adding Shared Parameters to a Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667 Placing, Tagging, and Scheduling a Family with Shared Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 670 Scheduling Uniformat Assembly Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 674 Scheduling Uniformat Assembly Codes and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 674 Exporting Project Information with ODBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 676 Exporting Schedule Information to Microsoft Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 676 Chapter 12 Annotating and Dimensioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 679 Changing the Base Elevation of a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 679 Relocating a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 681 Dimensioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 686 Creating Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 686 Creating Automatic Wall Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 695 Controlling Witness Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 697 Creating an Office Standard Dimension Type from Existing Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . 702 Creating Text Annotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 705 Adding Text Notes to the Floor Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 706 Chapter 13 Detailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 713 Creating a Detail from a Building Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 713 Detailing the View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714 Adding Detail Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 720 Adding Text Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 724 Creating Detail Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726 Adding Keynotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 728 Creating Line-based Detail Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 730 Modifying a Keynote Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 735 Creating a Drafted Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736 Importing a Detail into a Drafting View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737 Creating a Reference Callout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737 Creating a Detail in a Drafting View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 739 Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 755 Using Note Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 755 Creating a Note Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 755 Using Drawing Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 761 Creating a Drawing List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 761 Using Legends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 763 viii | Contents
  8. 8. Creating a Symbol Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 763 Creating a Component Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 767 Using Revision Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772 Setting Up a Revision Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772 Sketching Revision Clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 774 Tagging Revision Clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 776 Working with Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 777 Importing from Other Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 783 Importing Image Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 784 Importing Text Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 784 Importing Spreadsheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 785 Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 787 Using Dependent Views in Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 789 Using Dependent Views for Floor Plan Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 789 Using Dependent Views for Elevation Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800 Using Advanced Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 805 Chapter 16 Grouping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 807 Creating, Modifying, and Nesting Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 807 Creating and Placing a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 807 Modifying a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815 Nesting Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 819 Working with Detail Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 822 Creating a Detail Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 822 Using Attached Detail Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 825 Saving and Loading Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 828 Saving and Loading Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 828 Chapter 17 Sharing Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 831 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 831 Using Worksharing in a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 832 Understanding Worksharing Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 832 Enabling Worksharing and Setting Up Worksets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 836 Working Individually with Worksets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 840 Using Worksets with Multiple Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 843 Borrowing Elements from the Worksets of Other Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 848 Chapter 18 Creating Multiple Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853 Creating Multiple Design Options in a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853 Creating the Structural Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 854 Creating the Roof System Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 864 Managing Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 871 Chapter 19 Project Phasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 875 Using Phasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 875 Phasing Your Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 876 Using Phase-Specific Room Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 882 Chapter 20 Linking Building Models and Sharing Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 885 Linking Building Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 886 Linking Building Models from Different Project Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 886 Repositioning Linked Building Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 895 Controlling Linked Building Model Visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 898 Contents | ix
  9. 9. Managing Linked Building Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 900 Sharing Coordinates Between Building Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903 Acquiring and Publishing Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903 Relocating a Project with Shared Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 905 Working with a Linked Building Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 908 Managing Shared Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 910 Scheduling Components of Linked Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 911 Customizing Project Settings and Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 915 Chapter 21 Modifying Project and System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 917 Modifying System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 917 Modifying General System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 917 Specifying File Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 919 Specifying Spelling Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 921 Modifying Snap Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 922 Modifying Project Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 925 Creating and Applying Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 925 Creating and Applying Fill Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 929 Controlling Object Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 931 Modifying Line Patterns and Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 934 Modifying Annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 939 Specifying Units of Measurement, Temporary Dimensions, and Detail Level Options . . . . . . 941 Modifying Project Browser Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 942 Creating an Office Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 945 Choosing the Base Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 945 Modifying Project Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 946 Loading and Modifying Families and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 951 Modifying Views and View Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 953 Modifying Import/Export Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 956 Setting up Shared and Project Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 957 Creating Named Print Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 959 x | Contents
  10. 10. Getting Started 1
  11. 11. 2
  12. 12. Introduction This introduction helps you get started with the Revit MEP 2009 tutorials and presents the fundamental concepts of the product, including: ■ how Revit MEP works. ■ the terms used when working with the product. ■ how to navigate the user interface. ■ how to perform some common tasks in the product. Using theTutorials In this lesson, you learn how to use the Revit MEP tutorials, including where to find the training files and how to create a new Revit MEP project from a template file. The Contents tab of the Revit MEP Tutorials window displays the available tutorial titles. Expand a title for a list of lessons in the tutorial. Expand a lesson title for a list of exercises in the lesson. NOTE You may find it helpful to print a tutorial to make it easier to reference the instructions as you work in Revit MEP. The tutorials are also available in PDF format by clicking Help menu ➤ Documents on the Web in Revit MEP. AccessingTraining Files Training files are Revit MEP projects, templates, and families that were created specifically for use with the tutorials. In this exercise, you learn where the training files are located, as well as how to open and save them. Where are the training files located? Training files, by default, are located in C:Documents and SettingsAll UsersApplication DataAutodeskRME 2009Training. Training files are grouped into 3 folders within the training folder: ■ Common: generic files often used to teach a concept. These files are not dependent on imperial or metric units. Common file names have a c_ prefix. 1 3
  13. 13. ■ Imperial: files for users working with imperial units. Imperial file names have an i_ prefix. ■ Metric: files for users working with metric units. Metric file names have an m_ prefix. NOTE Depending on your installation, your training folder may be in a different location. Contact your CAD manager for more information. IMPORTANT Content used in the tutorials, such as templates and families, is located and accessed in the training files location. Although this content may be installed in other locations on your system, all content used in the tutorials is included in the training files location to ensure that all audiences access the correct files. What is a training file? A training file is a Revit MEP project that defines a building information model and views of the model that are used to complete the steps in a tutorial. Many tutorials include a Training File section that references the training file to be used with the tutorial. In other tutorials, you create a project from a template, rather than opening an existing training file. Open a training file 1 Click File menu ➤ Open. 2 In the left pane of the Open dialog, scroll down, and click the Training Files icon. 3 In the right pane, double-click Common, Imperial, or Metric, depending on the type of training file. 4 Click the training file name, and click Open. Save a training file 5 To save a training file with a new name, click File menu ➤ Save As. In many cases, the work you do in a project during a tutorial exercise becomes the starting point for the next exercise. In many tutorials, you create a project or modify an existing project, save the changes, and use the saved version of the file to begin the next exercise or lesson. 6 Complete the information in the Save As dialog: ■ For Save in, select the folder in which to save the new file. You can save the file in the appropriate Training Files folder or in another location. Note where you save the file so you can open it for additional exercises as required. 4 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  14. 14. ■ For File name, enter the new file name. A good practice is to save the training file with a unique name after you have made changes. For example, if you open c_settings.rvt and make changes, you should save this file with a new name such as c_settings_modified.rvt. ■ For Files of type, verify that Project Files (*.rvt) is selected, and then click Save. Create a project from a template 7 To create a project from a template, rather than using an existing training file, click File menu ➤ New ➤ Project. 8 In the New Project dialog, under Create new, select Project. 9 Under Template file, verify the second option is selected, and click Browse. 10 In the left pane of the Choose Template dialog, click Training Files, and open MetricTemplates. 11 In the Choose Template dialog, review the Revit MEP templates. Templates are available for specific building types: commercial, construction, and residential. Each template contains predefined settings and views appropriate for the corresponding building type. For most tutorial projects, you will use the default template, and customize the project as necessary. 12 Select DefaultMetric.rte, and click Open. 13 Click OK. Understanding the Basics In this lesson, you learn what Revit MEP is and how its parametric change engine benefits you and your work. You begin with the fundamental concepts on which Revit MEP is built. You learn the terminology, the hierarchy of elements, how to navigate the user interface, and how to perform some common tasks in the product. What is Revit MEP 2009? The Revit MEP platform for building information modelling is a design and documentation system that supports the design, drawings, and schedules required for a building project. Building information modelling (BIM) delivers information about project design, scope, quantities, and phases when you need it. In the Revit MEP model, every drawing sheet, 2D and 3D view, and schedule is a presentation of information from the same underlying building model database. As you work in drawing and schedule views, Revit MEP collects information about the building project and coordinates this information across all other representations of the project. The Revit MEP parametric change engine automatically coordinates changes made anywhere—in model views, drawing sheets, schedules, sections, and plans. Understanding the Basics | 5
  15. 15. What is meant by parametric? The term parametric refers to the relationships among all elements of the model that enable the coordination and change management that Revit MEP provides. These relationships are created either automatically by the software or by you as you work. In mathematics and mechanical CAD, the numbers or characteristics that define these kinds of relationships are called parameters; hence, the operation of the software is parametric. This capability delivers the fundamental coordination and productivity benefits of Revit MEP: Change anything at any time anywhere in the project, and Revit MEP coordinates that change through the entire project. The following are examples of these element relationships: ■ The outside of a door frame is a fixed dimension on the hinge side from a perpendicular partition. If you move the partition, the door retains this relationship to the partition. ■ Windows or pilasters are spaced equally across a given elevation. If the length of the elevation is changed, the relationship of equal spacing is maintained. In this case, the parameter is not a number but a proportional characteristic. ■ The edge of a floor or roof is related to the exterior wall such that when the exterior wall is moved, the floor or roof remains connected. In this case, the parameter is one of association or connection. How does Revit MEP 2009 keep things updated? A fundamental characteristic of a building information modelling application is the ability to coordinate changes and maintain consistency at all times. You do not have to intervene to update drawings or links. When you change something, Revit MEP immediately determines what is affected by the change and reflects that change to any affected elements. Revit MEP uses 2 key concepts that make it especially powerful and easy to use. The first is the capturing of relationships while the designer works. The second is its approach to propagating building changes. The result of these concepts is software that works like you do, without requiring entry of data that is unimportant to your design. Element behavior in a parametric modeler In projects, Revit MEP uses 3 types of elements: ■ Model elements represent the actual 3D geometry of the building. They display in relevant views of the model. For example, walls, windows, doors, and roofs are model elements. ■ Datum elements help to define project context. For example, grids, levels, and reference planes are datum elements. ■ View-specific elements display only in the views in which they are placed. They help to describe or document the model. For example, dimensions, tags, and 2D detail components are view-specific elements. 6 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  16. 16. There are 2 types of model elements: ■ Hosts (or host elements) are generally built in place at the construction site. For example, walls and roofs are hosts. ■ Model components are all the other types of elements in the building model. For example, windows, doors, and cabinets are model components. There are 2 types of view-specific elements: ■ Annotation elements are 2D components that document the model and maintain scale on paper. For example, dimensions, tags, and keynotes are annotation elements. ■ Details are 2D items that provide details about the building model in a particular view. Examples include detail lines, filled regions, and 2D detail components. This implementation provides flexibility for designers. Revit MEP elements are designed to be created and modified by you directly; programming is not required. If you can draw, you can define new parametric elements in Revit MEP. In Revit MEP, the elements determine their behavior largely from their context in the building. The context is determined by how you draw the component and the constraint relationships that are established with other components. Often, you do nothing to establish these relationships; they are implied by what you do and how you draw. In other cases, you can explicitly control them, by locking a dimension or aligning 2 walls, for example. Understanding Revit MEP 2009 terms Most of the terms used to identify objects in Revit MEP are common, industry-standard terms familiar to most architects. However, some terms are unique to Revit MEP. Understanding the following terms is crucial to understanding the software. Project: In Revit MEP, the project is the single database of information for your design—the building information model. The project file contains all information for the building design, from geometry to construction data. This information includes components used to design the model, views of the project, and drawings of the design. By using a single project file, Revit MEP makes it easy for you to alter the design and have changes reflected in all associated areas (plan views, elevation views, section views, schedules, and so forth). Having only one file to track also makes it easier to manage the project. Level: Levels are infinite horizontal planes that act as a reference for level-hosted elements, such as roofs, floors, and ceilings. Most often, you use levels to define a vertical height or story within a building. You Understanding the Basics | 7
  17. 17. create a level for each known story or other needed reference of the building; for example, first floor, top of wall, or bottom of foundation. To place levels, you must be in a section or elevation view. Level 2 work plane cutting through the 3D view with the corresponding floor plan next to it Element: When creating a project, you add Revit MEP parametric building elements to the design. Revit MEP classifies elements by categories, families, and types. Category: A category is a group of elements that you use to model or document a building design. For example, categories of model elements include walls and beams. Categories of annotation elements include tags and text notes. Family: Families are classes of elements in a category. A family groups elements with a common set of parameters (properties), identical use, and similar graphical representation. Different elements in a family may have different values for some or all properties, but the set of properties—their names and meaning—is the same. For example, 6-panel colonial doors could be considered one family, although the doors that compose the family come in different sizes and materials. Families are either component families or system families: ■ Component families can be loaded into a project and created from family templates. You can determine the set of properties and the graphical representation of the family. 8 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  18. 18. ■ System families include walls, dimensions, ceilings, roofs, floors, and levels. They are not available for loading or creating as separate files. ■ Revit MEP predefines the set of properties and the graphical representation of system families. ■ You can use the predefined types to generate new types that belong to this family within the project. For example, the behavior of a wall is predefined in the system. However, you can create different types of walls with different compositions. ■ System families can be transferred between projects. Type: Each family can have several types. A type can be a specific size of a family, such as a A0 title block or a 910 x 2110 door. A type can also be a style, such as default aligned or default angular style for dimensions. Instance: Instances are the actual items (individual elements) that are placed in the project and have specific locations in the building (model instances) or on a drawing sheet (annotation instances). Navigating the User Interface One of the advantages of Revit MEP is its ease of use, specifically its clear user interface. The Revit MEP window is arranged to make navigation easy. Even the toolbar buttons are labeled, making it easy to understand what each button represents. Revit MEP uses standard Microsoft® Windows® conventions. If you have used any other product that follows these conventions, learning Revit MEP is much easier. In the following illustration, the user interface is labeled. In the steps that follow, you navigate and become familiar with the user interface. Navigating the User Interface | 9
  19. 19. Start a new project 1 On the Standard toolbar, click (New). This creates a new project based on the default template. The Title Bar 2 Place the cursor at the top of the user interface. The title bar contains the name of the project and the view that is currently open. By default, new projects are numbered consecutively until saved with a new name. In addition, the Level 1 floor plan view is the default open view. TIP The view opened and the view names are dependent on the template on which the project is based. The Menu Bar 3 The menu bar across the top of the window includes standard menu names such as File, Edit, and View. Click View menu ➤ Zoom. Many of the commands have shortcut keys, which are listed on the menu. For example, the shortcut key for Zoom in Region is ZR. While working in the drawing area, you type the required key combination to perform the command. Another time-saving tool for selecting commands is to place the cursor in the drawing area and right-click. A shortcut menu displays a list of available commands, depending on the function you are performing and what is currently selected. The Toolbar 4 Click Window menu ➤ Toolbar. There are several toolbars across the top of the window beneath the menu bar. The toolbar buttons represent common commands. You can control the visibility of the toolbars and turn 10 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  20. 20. the text labels on or off using the Window ➤ Toolbar menu. You can use the toolbar grips to resize and move each toolbar. The Options Bar 5 Click Modelling menu ➤ Wall. The bar beneath the toolbars contains wall design options. The Options Bar is context-sensitive and varies depending on the tool or selected component. 6 Click Modelling menu ➤ Door. The design options available on the Options Bar are now applicable to doors. On the left side of the Options Bar, a door type is specified. The Type Selector 7 The drop-down list on the left side of the Options Bar is called the Type Selector. Select the drop-down list to view the list of doors. The Type Selector is a context-sensitive drop-down list. When you select the Door tool, the Type Selector displays a list of doors available in the project. The list of elements in the Type Selector is identical to the elements listed in the Families branch of the Project Browser under the respective category. Navigating the User Interface | 11
  21. 21. 8 Click Modelling menu ➤ Wall. 9 In the Type Selector, select the drop-down list to see the walls that are available. You can use the Type Selector in 2 ways: ■ You can select an element type before you add the element to the building model. For example, when you add a door, the door type that displays in the Type Selector is the door type that will be added to the building model. ■ You can use the Type Selector to change an element type after it has been added to the building model. In the drawing area, you can select any element and then change its type using the Type Selector. The Design Bar 10 Click Window menu ➤ Design Bars. The Show Design Bars dialog displays. 12 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  22. 22. The Design Bar is located on the left side of the interface, immediately below the Type Selector. There are 10 tabs in the Design Bar, containing buttons grouped by function. You can control which tabs display by selecting them in the Show Design Bars dialog. 11 Click OK. Each tab contains frequently used commands that are also available from the menu bar. ■ Basics tab: commands for creating most basic building model components ■ View tab: commands for creating different views in the project ■ Modelling tab: commands to create model elements ■ Drafting tab: commands for adding annotation symbols and creating sheet details for construction documents ■ Rendering tab: commands for creating rendered images ■ Site tab: commands for adding site components and producing site plans ■ Massing tab: commands for creating conceptual designs with masses ■ Room and Area tab: commands for making room and area schemes and plans ■ Structural tab: commands for adding structural components to the project ■ Construction tab: commands for creating construction industry information To access the commands in a tab, click the tab in the Design Bar. The respective commands display on the Design Bar. Navigating the User Interface | 13
  23. 23. TIP You can control the visibility of each tab by right-clicking on the Design Bar and selecting the tab from the shortcut menu. The Project Browser 12 To the right of the Design Bar is the Project Browser. In the Project Browser, select Views (all). You can use the Project Browser to quickly manage the views, schedules, sheets, reports, families, and groups of your current project: ■ Right-click in the browser to add, delete, and rename views, families, and groups. 14 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  24. 24. ■ The browser is organized by view type (floor plans, elevations, 3D), family category (doors, walls, windows), and group name. Expand or collapse the browser list by clicking the + or – next to the name. ■ To open a view, double-click its name. ■ You can also drag and drop from the browser into the drawing area, making it easy to add a family or group to the project or add a view to a sheet. ■ The browser is dockable, so you can reposition it by dragging the Project Browser title bar to a new location. 13 In the Type Selector, scroll through the sorting options available for the Project Browser. 14 Click Settings menu ➤ Browser Organization. You can create and modify Project Browser organization schemes for views and sheets. After creating a browser organization scheme, you can instantly change the sorting within the Project Browser by selecting the scheme in the Type Selector. 15 In the Browser Organization dialog, click Cancel. The Status Bar 16 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Wall. 17 Place the cursor near the center of the drawing area. Do not click. The cursor displays as a pencil. Navigating the User Interface | 15
  25. 25. In the bottom left corner of the window, the status bar provides information regarding what you should do next. In this case, it tells you to "Click to enter wall start point." TIP The tooltip that displays is identical to the note in the status bar. 18 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the Wall command. You can control the status bar visibility from the Window menu. The status bar also provides information, in conjunction with tooltips, regarding selected elements in a view. When you place the cursor over an element, it highlights and the status bar displays the element name. 19 Place the cursor over the elevation symbol arrow on the left side of the drawing area. The elevation symbol consists of two parts: the main symbol and the elevation directional arrow (a triangle). Make sure you place the cursor over the elevation directional arrow. It highlights when the cursor is over it. In the status bar, notice that the name of the highlighted element is Views : Elevation : West. 20 Press TAB, and notice that the highlighted element switches to the main elevation symbol, Elevations : Elevation : Elevation 5. When attempting to select a specific element in a complex or crowded view, you can use the status bar and TAB to switch between elements and select the desired element. Revit MEP 2009 Help 21 Click Help menu ➤ Revit MEP 2009 Help. Help is available online at all times during a Revit MEP session. You can use this tri-pane, HTML help window to search for information and quickly display it to read or print. There are several tools that help you find information. You can select a topic on the Contents tab, find a keyword on the Index tab, search for all instances of a word or phrase on the Search tab, or save commonly used pages on the Favorites tab. 16 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  26. 26. In addition, context-sensitive help is available for many parts of the user interface. You can access context-sensitive help in the following ways: ■ Dialogs: Many dialogs include Help buttons. Click the Help button, and the topic specific to the dialog opens. If no Help button displays, press F1 for context-sensitive help. ■ Windows: From any window, press F1 for help. ■ Toolbar: From the toolbar, click on the Standard toolbar, and then click a specific menu command or button for help. You can also press SHIFT+F1. ■ Tooltips: To see tooltips, rest the cursor over the Toolbar button until the tooltip displays. TIP You can control the level of tooltip assistance using Settings menu ➤ Options. 22 Close the Revit MEP Help window. Performing CommonTasks in Revit MEP In this exercise, you learn to perform some of the common Revit MEP tasks that are included in the tutorials. After you are familiar with these tasks, it will be easier to work in Revit MEP and focus on the lessons of each tutorial. Use zoom commands to adjust the view In the tutorials, you are instructed to use a zoom command to adjust the viewable area in the window. For example, you may be asked to zoom to a specific region of a view or to zoom to fit the entire building or floor plan in the view. Understanding how to adjust the view will make it easier to work with the building model in the window. There are several ways to access zoom options. In the following steps, you open a training file and practice adjusting the view with the different zoom commands. 1 Click File menu ➤ Open. 2 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metricm_Cohouse.rvt. The 3D isometric view displays: 3 Click View menu ➤ Zoom to display the zoom menu. Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP | 17
  27. 27. The zoom menu lists the zoom options and their shortcut keys. 4 Click Zoom Out (2x). In the drawing area, the view zooms out from the building model. 5 On the View toolbar, click the drop-down menu next to the Zoom command to display the zoom options. NOTE Clicking the Zoom icon itself activates the Zoom In Region command. 6 Click Zoom To Fit. The view of the building model is sized to fit the available window. 7 Click in the drawing area, and type the shortcut ZR to zoom in on a region. The cursor becomes a magnifying glass. 8 Click the upper left corner and lower right corner of the region to magnify; this is referred to as a crossing selection. When you release the mouse button, the view zooms in on the selected area. 18 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  28. 28. 9 If you use a mouse that has a wheel as the middle button, you can roll the wheel to zoom the view. Use the wheel mouse to zoom out to see the entire building again. If you do not have a wheel mouse, use a zoom menu command or the toolbar option to zoom out. NOTE As you zoom in and out, Revit MEP uses the largest snap increment that represents less than 2mm in the drawing area. To modify or add snap increments, click Settings menu ➤ Snaps. Zoom is also available using SteeringWheels. SteeringWheels provide 2D and 3D navigation tools. 10 To display SteeringWheels, on the View toolbar, click . The Full Navigation wheel displays in the drawing area. As you move the mouse, the wheel follows the cursor around the drawing area. 11 Move the cursor over the Zoom wedge of the wheel so that it highlights. 12 Click and hold the mouse button. The cursor displays a pivot point for the Zoom tool. 13 Drag the cursor down or left to zoom out. 14 Drag the cursor up or right to zoom in. You can change the pivot point by releasing the mouse button, moving the wheel to the desired location, and then using the Zoom tool again. For more information about SteeringWheels, click the pull-down menu on the Full Navigation wheel, and click Help. To define settings for SteeringWheels, click Settings menu ➤ Options, and click the SteeringWheels tab. 15 To exit the wheel, press ESC. Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP | 19
  29. 29. Resize elements using drag controls 16 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click 2nd Flr. Cnst. When drawing or modifying a building model, it is important to understand how to adjust the size of components in the drawing area. Small blue dots, called drag controls, display at the ends of selected lines and walls in a plan view. Similar controls, referred to as shape handles, display along the ends, bottoms, and tops of selected walls in elevation views and 3D views. 17 Type ZR, zoom in on the upper-left corner of the floor plan, and select the wall, as shown. Notice the small blue dots that display at both ends of the wall. These are the drag controls. 18 Click and drag the left control, moving the cursor to the left horizontally, to lengthen the wall. 19 Click in the drawing area to deselect the wall. Move an element 20 Scroll the view down so you can see the couch and table in the floor plan. 21 Select the Craftsman02 table, and on the Tools toolbar, click (Move). 20 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  30. 30. Some commands, such as Move and Copy, require 2 clicks to complete the command. After selecting the element to move, for example, click to specify the starting position, and click again to specify the ending position. In this case, you want to move the table closer to the wall. 22 Click the lower-left endpoint of the table. 23 Click next to the lower wall, as shown. The table moves down, and the lower-left corner is placed at the move endpoint. Another way to move an element is to select it and drag it to a new location. 24 Select the plant, and drag it on top of the table. Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP | 21
  31. 31. Undo commands 25 On the Standard toolbar, click the drop-down menu next to (Undo). All changes you make to a project are tracked. The Undo command allows you to reverse the effects of one or more commands. In this example, you decide that you prefer the table in its original position. 26 On the Undo menu, select the second item in the list, Move. Selecting the second item in the list will undo the last 2 actions. All commands are canceled up to and including the selected command. The table and plant are returned to their original locations. NOTE To quickly undo the previous action, on the Standard toolbar, click the Undo command, or press CTRL+Z. End a command 27 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Lines. Some commands, such as the Lines command, stay active or current until you choose another command or end the current command. 28 Click in the drawing area to start the line, and click again to end it. Notice that the Lines command is still active and you could continue to draw lines. 29 To end the command, use one of the following methods: ■ Choose another command. ■ On the Design Bar, click Modify. ■ Press ESC twice. 30 Close the file without saving your changes. 22 | Chapter 1 Introduction
  32. 32. Express Workshop 23
  33. 33. 24
  34. 34. Express Workshop The Express Workshop tutorials focus on specific areas of Revit MEP functionality and highlight powerful features that are integral to the most common MEP workflows. Each tutorial demonstrates tools you can use to complete tasks that are common to an overall workflow. When you have finished these tutorials, you will have a basic understanding of Revit MEP design and documentation tools, as well as some of the best practices that help you efficiently design and develop an MEP project. Creating a Supply Air System In this lesson, you create a supply air system that consists of 2 low pressure, secondary supply air systems and a primary, high pressure system. In Revit MEP, an HVAC system is a logical connection between air terminals and HVAC mechanical equipment. After air terminals and mechanical equipment are