Essay On The Civil Rights Movement

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Essay on The Civil Rights Movement
The purpose of this essay is to outline the main events of the African–American Civil Rights Movement. Specifically, the focus will be on the main
activists involved in the movement such as Martin Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks and the major campaigns of civil resistance. The Civil Rights
Movement refers to the movements in the United States aimed at outlawing racial discrimination against African Americans and restoring voting rights
in Southern states.African–Americans were able to gain the rights to issues such as equal access to public transportation, right to vote, right to fair
trials, and many others. The many movements lasted roughly from 1955 to 1968. During this time African–Americans were constantly degraded and
reminded of...show more content...
The driver noticed a white man standing and then demanded her entire row move as blacks were forbidden to sit next to whites. After refusing to
move, Rosa Parks was reported to the police and arrested for violating the 'whites first' bus laws. Her case was used to fight segregation laws which
pushed for complete desegregation on public transport. 50,000 of Montgomery's African Americans supported the boycott which lasted for 381 days
until the local ordinance segregating African–Americans and whites on public buses was lifted. Ninety percent of African Americans in Montgomery
took part in the boycotts until a federal court ordered Montgomery's buses desegregated in November 1956. Martin Luther King Jr was a prominent
leader in the African–American Civil Rights Movement. A baptist minister, he became a civil rights activist early on. The Montgomery Bus Boycott
was planned and pursued by fellow activist leader E.D Nixon and soon led by King. During this time King's house was bombed and he was later
arrested. The Freedom Rides were journeys taken by Civil Rights activists on interstate buses into the segregated southern states of America. These
were organized by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), the first Freedom Ride left Washington D.C. on May 4, 1961. Activists travelled to the
highly segregated South and sought to integrate seating and desegregate bus terminals, restrooms and
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The Civil Rights Movement in the 1960’s Essay
African Americans have been struggling for equality for many decades. It only seems that during the 1960?s is when there were actual significant
advances made. This was about the same time that civil rights came into the political scene. Throughout the South, Blacks were still in the majority,
but had no political power what so ever. The Civil Rights Movement gave African Americans a voice and a chance to make a difference. The 1960's
helped open up hope and expectations for Black Americans.
One of the most prominent men of his time, Martin Luther King Jr. was known as ?A national hero and a civil rights figure of growing importance?
(Discovering 1). ?Martin Luther King Jr. aroused whites and blacks to protest racial...show more content...
wanted to fight racism with love and Malcolm X wanted blacks to fight back when they were attacked. ?He was one of the most fiery and
controversial blacks of the twentieth century? (Discovering 1). ?Malcolm X, was regarded as personifying black nationalism? (Civil 117). ?Malcolm
was known for his incisive analysis on the problems of American democracy and the limitations of the intergrationalist Civil Rights Movement? (Civil
116). He believed that black men must reject Western society standards and develop their own society and ethical standards (Colliers 143). He
established the Organization of Afro–American Unity. He did this in order to try to unify all the black organizations by fighting white racism (Colliers
143). Malcolm wanted to inform blacks about the cultures that had been taken away from them and the self–hatred the whites had inspired
(Discovering 1). He wanted to point them to a better way of life. ?The black power movement to instill pride and a sense of self reliance in the African
American community? (Compton's 132).
Many organizations helped to throughout the Civil Rights Movement. Many of these organizations were lead by black activist seeking reform. One
of the most successful organizations is the NAACP. This stands for the National Association of Colored Advancement. Roy Wilkins was the head of
the NAACP during this time (Civil 909). The NAACP purpose was to eliminate racial prejudice by removing racial
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The Civil Rights Movement Essay
Johnson: Savior of the Civil Rights Movement? The Civil Rights Movement and President Johnson are closely linked in history. Though there were
many other faces to the Civil Rights Movement, Johnson's was one of the most publicly viewed and instrumental in its passing. It was Johnson who
carried the weight and responsibilities of the issue after the assassination of JFK, and it was he who would sign it. Lyndon B Johnson was the most
influential forces in establishing the movement that would ensure civil rights for black americans. Johnson was a constant and unwavering supporter
of civil rights. Without his supreme efforts in establishing civil rights for all, equality would never have come to pass. Lyndon B Johnson was elected
...show more content...
Lynching and hate crimes were commonplace, especially down south. America reeked of hatred and fear. Something needed to be done, intolerance
had to be abolished, and people needed to learn acceptance. LBJ fully felt the extent of the disfiguration of black americans done by racism. He told
his audience that " Ability is stretched or stunted by the family that you live with, and the neighborhood you live in––by the school you go to and the
poverty or the richness of your surroundings"(LBJ, speech at HU) meaning that he understood there were people destroyed by racism and people in
need of help in order to return to function in society. Johnson acknowledged the hardships of African American people in American society. He let it be
understood that what many of them had to put up with was extremely unjust. He once said "The American Negro, acting with impressive restraint, has
peacefully protested and marched, entered the courtrooms and the seats of government, demanding a justice that has long been denied" showing his
deep respect and a profound admiration for the patience and self restraint shown by black protestors, especially when their white accusers were less
than human in their actions. He also understood that his actions
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The Civil Rights Movement Essay
The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution form what is known as the Bill of Rights. In essence it is a summary of the basic rights
held by all U.S. citizens. However, Negro citizens during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950–70's felt this document and its mandate that
guaranteed the civil rights and civil liberties of all people; were interpreted differently for people of color. The freedoms outlined in the Constitution
were not enforced the same by the government of the United States for the black race as it did for the white race.
"You all treat us so bad," just like we are animals." Those are the words voiced by Mrs. Rosa Parks, a Negro seamstress. Whose refusal to move to the
back of the bus and give her seat to a...show more content...
In other marches, K–9 units were used to terrorize prospective marchers and police used power water hose to disperse marchers. The force of the
water was so powerful that it rolled people down the streets. Massive murders and lynching were not investigated, but considered a necessary item to
deter the Negroes and their Movement.
Groups such as the Black Panthers were villanized by our government. Unlike the SLNC the Panthers wanted nothing to do with finding a nonviolent
solution. Unlike the SLNC they felt you fight violence with violence. The Federal Bureau of Investigation, headed by J. Edgar Hoover made it a
priority to disband the Panthers. Yet the Johnson administration allowed the harassment of the Panthers; but, the Klu Klux were allowed to flourish,
march in protest–proclaiming White Supremacy and all the while committing hate crimes against Negroes.
The injustice of the blatant defiance of the Constitution by the government and by Whites did not begin and end with the segregation of the
educational system. It incorporated almost every facet of our society. From Blacks not being served in restaurants, using the same public toilets, and
water fountains as Whites to even the military. Blacks were not allowed the basic freedoms that most people under the age of
45–years old, barely comprehend those pass denials to the black race today.
The story of Black Americans is mainly
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The Civil Rights Movement Essay
"Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." – – Martin Luther King, Jr.
The Civil rights Movement helped people realize how powerful their voice can be, which changed America completely. One of those people who had a
powerful voice was Martin Luther King, Jr. He was an inspiring and influential leader of the Civil Rights Movement. The quote above is just one of
many inspirational comments made by Martin Luther King. The peaceful protests against racism, which this African–American man directed, often got
responses of violent threats, beatings, and arrests. King stressed how significant it was that the black community would not stoop down to the...show
more content...
Later to become the first African–American Supreme Court Justice in America, Marshall was the man who argued the "separate but equal" was just a
myth trying to cover up racism. Even though it is not a single person, the Little Rock Nine was another contributor to discovering equal rights for
African–Americans. This group was the first crowd of blacks to attend Central High School, an all–white school in Little Rock, Arkansas. Being in the
Deep South, there was an unbelievable amount of racism. However, these African–American teenagers were determined to stay and be given an equal
chance at education as whites received. One day when she was walking into school, Elizabeth Eckford, age fifteen, said Though they had to fight
through insults and even death threats, several of the Little Rock Nine students proceeded through high school to get their diploma. Nine
African–American students faced a racist system and conquered it. On February 1, 1960, four African–American college students, all freshmen,
protested at a "whites only" Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. They insisted to be served and by doing this, they
unintentionally built the foundation for a countrywide movement. After the students sat and politely requested service, the manager of the store came
out and asked for them to leave. The next day, several other North Carolina Agricultural and Technical black students joined these freshmen and
protested. As the days went
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The Civil Rights Movement Essay
"Our problem today is that we have allowed the internal to become lost in the external" –Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Today's world is based on appearance, and most often the goal is not as important as the means by which it is achieved. Why is this such a 'problem?'
Time after time, people come to find that they have wasted their lives working towards a goal which, in the end, was never worth all that work to
begin with, or they realize that they could have gone about their actions differently. The people ofmodern America are all about living live for the
moment, taking risks, not making sacrifices, and never yielding to 'the long run'. Looking at the world of 2015, one can witness the apex of human
civilization. Who can...show more content...
In September of 1957, at Little Rock High School, crowds of people against the integration of public schools, prevented nine black students from
entering the school.
What a waste of time that was. Instead of getting so worked up about who goes to what school, people should have stepped down and kept their
opinions, and oppositions inside.
This is an example of why ?bottling up? emotions is a good thing.
It is not necessarily one?s appearance that make others not like him, but the things he says and does. Because of this, it is very hard to believe that
white people oppressed blacks solely because of skin color. Oppression is wrong no matter what, but certain actions, and the way they were executed,
which blacks took to eliminate segregation may have instead fueled hatred from whites. Sit–ins and bus boycotts are all forms of protest and rebellion,
no matter how nonviolent they are. The Rosa Parks bus incident in 1955 is a great example of how two sides can escalate conflict. On one hand Rosa
Parks refused to be polite and give up her seat, and started a nationwide boycott against public transportation. On the other hand, some white guy has
nothing better to do that complain that he can not sit at the front of the bus.
The only thing harder than integrating two races is integrating two races when one side is opposed. Due to, once again internal principles and beliefs
(as earlier discussed in this
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The Civil Rights Movement was a pivotal time in American history, leading us toward the acceptance and advancement of African Americans in
society, and eventually the same for other minority groups. The movement as a whole spanned from around the beginning of the 1950's to around the
beginning of the 1970's. All across the nation, African American people fought for their rights through numerous protests and boycotts. Some notable
events are the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the March on Washington, and the Greensboro lunch counter sit–ins. Many forms of legislation and many
judiciary decisions were made during this era, such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and 1968, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown v. Board of
Education ("A Timeline of the Civil Rights Movement FOOTSTEPS OF COURAGE").
This movement is extremely well documented when it comes to all kinds of sources, such as photographs, diaries, interviews, and videos. Many of
these sources are housed in Wilson Library, some of which are very intriguing and carry messages that are still relevant to this day. One noteworthy
photograph I discovered is one of a group of protestors on Franklin Street. The photograph was taken by an unknown photographer and it was taken
in December of 1963. The group stands firmly in front of the post office; a landmark on Franklin Street, which is now known as Peace and Justice
Plaza. It was named this because it is where protest marches would end and where a memorial plaque was placed for the
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Essay About The Civil Rights Movement
The Reconstruction after the Civil War was meant to rebuild Southern government and society, but failed to bring equality to African Americans. The
civil rights movement after World War II worked to bring this necessary justice to all men. The civil rights movement worked to fix America's problem
of inequality based on race, and succeeded where the Reconstruction had failed. After the end of World War II, the civil rights movement spread across
America. This movement began in the northern United States, and over time spread to the historically racist South. There, people like Rosa Parks and
Martin Luther King, Jr. sparked protests and launched campaigns, bringing to attention the people's desire for equality. Over time, this movement
allowed...show more content...
However, in 1896, the case of Plessy v. Ferguson ruled that segregation of races was constitutional, as long as "separate but equal" facilities were
provided. This resulted in public facilities in the South – such as buses, restaurants, and schools – becoming isolated based off of race. During the civil
rights movement, people worked to desegregate public establishments so that they could be used by everyone. In 1954, Chief Justice Warren ruled in
the case of Brown v. Board of Education that "...in the field of public education the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate educational
facilities are inherently unequal..." (Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts). Schools in the South, especially the Deep South, resisted
desegregation, but eventually had to comply with the court's ruling. The Montgomery bus boycott, sparked by Rosa Parks's arrest for sitting in the
"whites only" section of a public bus, lasted for over a year in from 1955 to 1956. Sit–ins began occurring in 1960, in which African Americans sat in
restaurants, demanding service despite the fact these areas were segregated. Both of these events brought attention to the unfairness of segregation, and
slowly public facilities worked to desegregate. The increase of awareness of the inequality that separate facilities brought was successful in making
services accessible to Americans of all
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The Civil Rights Movement: Freedom Rides Essay
During the Civil Rights Movement, African Americans sought to have their Constitutional Rights permitted. One form of protesting came forth in the
form of the Freedom Rides. After slavery ended, many amendments and laws were created to ensure the rights of African Americans, but because of
prejudices and racism, most of these were ignored. The Supreme Court's decision in Plessy v. Fergunson established "separate but equal" on interstate
transportation in 1896, but in 1947 the Supreme Court found it unconstitutional. And although segregation was outlawed, Jim Crow laws still ruled the
Deep South and "codified in law, sanctioned by the courts, and enforced by the ubiquitous threat of physical violence even more than legal reprisal"
(Catsam...show more content...
This belief soon changed because women became the core of the Civil Rights Movement, especially Diane Nash. She was, "One of the leaders of
the Nashville Movement, was one of the foremost figures when students took over the freedom rides after violence caused the original CORE
group to call the project to an end in Birmingham" (93). Freedom Rides became influential in changing people's mindsets because they noticed how
the students involved and how they were treated. The students were carefully trained in nonviolence, a "technique require[d] that a participant not
strike anyone, not even to save himself/herself or a group member from a beating" (Olds 18). Although the students used the passive approach,
trouble still awaited them. Once in Montgomery Alabama, furious crowds surrounded them screaming "GIT them niggers! GIT them niggers!"
(Lewis 158). They were attacked, beat and bled a great deal. Not only did the Freedom Riders get assaulted, but journalists who covered their stories
were also targeted. Ultimately, "If you had a pencil or a pad, or a camera, you were in real trouble" (Morrison 29). Though successful, when Freedom
Rides were first introduced, many civil rights leaders didn't want to take part of it, because of doubt concerning their overall effectiveness. Civil rights
leaders believed Freedom Rides would hold up the Movement, but over time they became one of the largest and most supported movements during the
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Summary: The Civil Rights Movement
Although the Civil Rights Movement hasgarneredmuchpublicawarenessandsympathy since it first picked up steam in
thelate1950s,itsgoalsareyettobefullyrealized.Thedays where segregation laws prevailed in schools, workplaces, and the like are long past, but its
effects still linger today. From a political perspective, blacks' voices are greater than ever before, with a voting turnout surpassing those of white
Americans' in the 2012 presidential election, and 10,500 black officialscurrentlyservingthegovernment.Financial,educational, and social equality,
however, remain an elusive
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The Civil Rights Movement Essay
Many changes occurred during the late 1950s into the early 1960s in the goals, strategies, and support of the movement for African American civil
rights. Many strides were made for racial equality in the United States. However, while changes were made, they did take a considerable amount of
time to achieve. This made some leaders of the civil rights movement frustrated and caused them to divert from their original goal of integration. They
instead strove for black separatism where blacks and whites would live segregated. The civil rights movement started in 1955 with the Montgomery
Bus Boycott. Rosa Parks, a black woman, sat in the front of a public Montgomery bus. According to the Jim Crow laws...show more content...
The student would continue to politely recite his or her lines until the police showed up. The student would be arrested for violating the Jim Crow
laws. However, the commotion caused by the police caused the restaurants to lose business. For this reason, restaurant owners were forced to
desegregate their lunch counters. This process exemplified the strategy of SNCC. In a statement released in 1960, the organization stated its method
for achieving civil rights. They believed in nonviolence to help their goal of integration. They wanted t be equal with the white man. They wanted to be
able to do everything white people could do. Blacks did not want to be separated from whites, they wanted to be together and equal. Stokley Carmichael
exercised these beliefs in his civil rights movements. The lunch counter sit–ins were non–violent and they succeeded in their purpose to integrate the
lunch counters of the South. However, change came to slow for Stokley Carmichael. He became frustrated as stated in the introduction. He changed his
beliefs of non–violence and integration to violence and black separatism. In a statement entitled "What We Want" released in 1966 by Stokley
Carmichael, he said that blacks should join together and form their own society. This was reverting back to
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Causes And Effects Of The Civil Rights Movement
The Civil Rights Movement and the Effects
We have all heard about this movement, the major events that have taken place, and its magnificent leaders. However, what is meant by civil rights?
What does this term refer to?
Civil rights have been defined as the nonpolitical rights of citizens, in particular, the personal freedom of US citizens guaranteed by the laws passed by
Congress, as well as amendments to US Constitution No. 13, and14. (Miriam Webster Dictionary).
The term civil rights have been defined as all citizenship rights from actions and decisions taken by the government to create equal and guaranteed
living circumstances for all citizens, In specific, the Constitution Amendments No. 13, 14, 15, 19, and 26. (Barbour 2014 p.133).
Though this movement existed throughout the 19th century, it spread quickly until it reached its peak between the 1950's and 1960's. It was aimed at
getting black Americans (Africans) the rights and privileges of equality and citizenship without racism. This was done through large campaigns of
nonviolent demonstrations, negotiations, civil disobedience and all legal means. The movement was focused in the south, where there was
considerable disparity in education, health care, economics, and so forth.
However, how did it all start?
There were many events that had been taken place, which were the cause of this movement to be peaked.
Some events were (Sparks) short–term like Emmett Till, Rosa Parks, Mal. X, and M. L. King.
Some
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"Black Lives Matter (BLM) is a movement against police violence that is, as argued by BLM supporters, disproportionately and systematically
directed at black people. The movement has highlighted incidents in which police have harassed and killed black men and women. BLM is
considered one of the most visible and controversial civil rights movement of the last decades". (Black Lives Matter. 2016) Black Lives Matter is an
American social activist group that is dedicated to preventing inequality against African Americans. The group was established in 2013 after a cop by
the name of George Zimmerman was found not guilty of killing a black man named Trayvon Martin. The group feels that blacks are being targeted by
cops and that justice is not being served, regarding those cops who show violence toward black Americans. In the sixties, African Americans began a
Civil Rights Movement that, to some, continue today; hence, the Black Lives Matter movement. During the sixties, the main consensus for the Civil
Rights Movement was through nonviolent direct action. Martin Luther King Jr. believed that, through nonviolence, African Americans could conquer
their main objectives. King and other activists were able to accomplish many goals; they had a real purpose and one that was worth fighting for. Yet,
with all the progress made since the sixties, does "Black Lives Matter" still have a reasonable purpose, or is this movement doing more harm than
good? Barbara Reynolds, a Civil Rights
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The Civil Rights Movement Essay
Civil Rights are those rights that guarantee to all individuals by the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th Amendments of the U.S Constitution, as the right to vote
and the right to equal treatment under the law (Agnes 121). The Civil Rights Era (1954–1973) was a time of racism, discrimination, protests for
equality, and gained momentum to overcome horrific obstacles. This time period was inspired by African–Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans,
and any other citizen that was against what forms of discrimination there was at the time (Appleby 820). The teaching of Civil Rights to students is
imperative, especially to African–American Students. Segregation is the policy of compelling racial groups to live apart and use separate schools,
...show more content...
Later on, he became the first African–American appointed to the Supreme Court in 1967. Through this lead, the NAACP is how "Mr. Civil Rights" as
they call him won over the class act Brown v. Board of Education (Sharp 91–96). Even though he won the case the fight for education did not stop
there. Now that segregated education was supposedly won, there were still some deep blemishes in this action. On December 1, 1955, a seamstress
of the NAACP, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to move out of her seat for a white person when asked. She was later arrested for not doing so.
After arrested and set free the issue could have ended there; however, it did not. Rosa Parks' arrest led to a history making movement, the Montgomery
Bus Boycott. This movement was put in place to put a dent in the cities financial policies. As significance, all African–Americans pulled together and
stopped using the city buses; as well as, car pulling and walking. (Appleby 824) With the victory of the Montgomery Boycott, Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. became a leader of the civil rights movement (Appleby 825). He was a leader that chose to use nonviolent retaliations; such as Mohandas Gandhi,
his influencer. In January 1957, Dr. King and sixty other ministers started an organization called the Southern Christian Leadership Conference
(SCLC), and Dr. King was the president–elect. The SCLC prepared
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The Civil Rights Movement (1955- 1965) Essay
Civil Rights Movement in the United States, was a political, legal, and social struggle to gain full citizenship rights for African Americans and to
achieve racial equality. The civil rights movement was a challenge to segregation, the system of laws and customs separating blacks and whites.
During the civil rights movement, individuals and organizations challenged segregation and discrimination with a variety of activities, including protest
marches, boycotts, and refusal to abide by segregation laws. Some believe that the movement began with the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 and
ended with the Voting RightsAct of 1965, there is still however some debate about when it began and whether it has ended yet. The civil rights
movement...show more content...
Segregated facilities were not as common in the North, but blacks were usually denied entrance to the best hotels and restaurants. Schools in New
England were usually integrated, but those in the Midwest generally were not. The most difficult part of Northern life was the intense economic
discrimination against blacks.
Blacks fought against discrimination whenever possible. In the late 1800s blacks sued in courts to put an end to separate seating in railroad cars, states
disfranchisement of voters, and denial of access to schools and restaurants. One of the cases against segregation was Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896, in
which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that separate but equal accommodations were constitutional.
To protest segregation, blacks created new national organizations. The National Afro–American League, in 1890; the Niagara Movement in 1905; and
the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909.
The NAACP became one of the most important black protest organizations of the 20th century. The historian and sociologist W. E. B. Du Bois was
one of the early leaders of the NAACP.
In the postwar years, the NAACP's legal strategy for civil rights continued to succeed. They were now led by Thurgood Marshall. The U.S. Supreme
Court heard arguments on five cases that challenged elementary– and secondary–school segregation, and in May
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The Civil Rights Movement Essay
The civil rights movement was a span of time when the African Americans endeavor was to acquire their constitutional rights of which they were being
deprived. A commendable bearing of the civil rights movement was the unachievable triumph that the blacks sought after and built. Through courage,
persistence, and determination, the African Americans won their independence (enotes, 2010). The civil rights evolution was a period when society
was oppressed for many years, rose up against the disadvantage and accomplished their freedom. Many were unsettled with the way the civil rights
movement was being toted out in the 1960's (Marable, 1992). As a consequence, someone assassinated the leader of the crusade; Dr.Martin Luther King
Jr....show more content...
The decrease of support for the Vietnam War began in 1968. Despite the antiwar activity in theUnited States that had been existing before, the Tat
Offensive opened the eyes of numberless people. Some people continued to be highly supportive of the war and firmly trusted that if the South fell to
communism, the Domino Theory would incur (Ellis, 1969). Some started to dispute the motives behind the US government's sharing in Vietnam. They
arrived proclaiming to be fighting for freedom, democracy and independence but the governance that they were supporting in South Vietnam was
anything but equality and therefore it was immoral to support them. Some deemed that the Vietnam War needed transparent objectives. The foundation
of the 1960's had a distinctive bearing in the social history of United States and the opinion of the people. Martin Luther King conducted a non–violent
protest for the civil rights movement that was a period for people who were burdened for many years to emerge against their odds and gain their
freedom.
Over time there have been many admirable protestors who have made meaningful changes to the manner in which the world is today, some for the
better and some for the worse. One of the most operative and consequential protestors was a man by the name of Martin Luther King Jr. He had
monumental courage and passion to vanquish segregation and racism that existed in the United States
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Causes and Effects of the Civil Rights Movement By: Christal Mcwhorter The Civil Rights Movement has changed all of American's lives for
ever. The Civil Rights Movement is a big event and according to Eyes on the Prize. "The March on Washington on August 28, 1963." The reason
why was because the African Americans were tired of being oppressed and being treated differently. One cause is segregation and this is where
people are divided or split up. One more cause is violence/abuse is where people are treated badly like being punched or even being bullied
basically or it is where someone is getting hurt in a certain process. One after effect is integration, and it is where people are being put together so
being combined. Integration is an after effect of the Civil Rights Movement and it made things fair for African Americans because this gave them a
chance to interact better with the Americans and they got better jobs and they were put as equals finally because of integration. To begin with there
was segregation, separation, and just being divided up from each other. African Americans were separated by schools even stores and just normal
shops, and they were separated even by public bathrooms. Also an example of segregation and according to the autobiography Leon's Story. "We had
to sit up in the balcony. The whites sat at the...show more content...
Integration is an effect of the Civil Rights Movement. This is a good thing for the African Americans because they did not have to go with anything
bad like schools that did not have the proper items needed. Another effect of integration is African Americans were able to vote. Also they were able
to get the same jobs so better paying jobs or a better salary. This was a great thing because no one was unequal anymore. Something else about
integration is, ever since the big oppression against African Americans stopped people have been much
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Essay on The Civil Rights Movement
The civil rights movement comprised efforts of grassroots activists and national leaders to obtain for African Americans the basic rights guaranteed to
American citizens in the Constitution. The key players in succeeding with the civil rights movement were the soldiers returning from the war, Martin
Luther King Jr, Malcolm X, The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and the anti–Vietnam War activists. During the civil rights
movement, nearly every African American had experienced segregation at lunch stands. In a Journal by Melvin Small, she stated, "Just as with the
segregated buses in Montgomery, Alabama the African–American community, especially the segment of college students, had once again reached its
saturation...show more content...
College students and lower grade black students helped to stand up against the racial cruelty. Although the war was taking place, students across the
nation took advantage of it by protesting nonviolent for justice. This was just a small piece of the puzzle for justice in the United States because the
black soldiers played an even bigger role in the success of the movement. Soldiers of WWII had a substantial impact on the civil rights movement. In
the book, A Breath of Freedom, it stated, "During World War II the African American population pushed for equality and integration of the United
States military, which, at the time, remained in accordance with the culture and customs of the white majority by keeping the two races segregated
(Höhn)." The term, separate but equal, made famous by the United States Supreme Court case Plessy vs. Ferguson remained instantiated as the law
to abide by in reference to racial policy (Höhn). This concept of keeping both races segregated had permeated across the United States and was the
prominent view of most white citizens during this period. Segregation was seen from a white point–of–view as a way for both races to live within the
society without racial conflict and tension. Separation of blacks and whites stretched across all societal institutions, including the United States
Military. During the closing years of World War II and increasingly thereafter, African American GIs (Government Issued) complained
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The Rise Of The Civil Rights Movement
In 1960, there were tremendous of social ferment that was responsible for agitation and protest. Through direct protest, many African Americans,
women, and homosexuals were able to gain recognition and break down the walls of discrimination and segregations. Out of the numerous elements
that arose in the 1960s, there are three movements that truly affected the American society. Firstly, the rise of the civil rights movement was greatly
influenced by racial discrimination of colored people in the South. Secondly, the women's movement aimed to convince the society that women are
capable of achieving and maintaining higher waged job like males. Lastly, the gay rights movement aimed to gain acceptance and stop discrimination of
homosexuality. The most significant effect on the development of American society was the women's movement and how they expanded their
economic and political opportunities. The common goal among African Americans, women's, and homosexuals was to obtain their equal rights as
citizens of America and to desegregate all the boundaries between white and black population.
The civil rights movement was one of the main elements that were responsible for agitation and protest that greatly expanded in the 1960s. This social
movement "originated among black Americans in the South who faced racial discrimination and segregation, or the separation of whites and blacks, in
almost every aspect of their lives" ("Protests in the 1960s," 3). There was constant racial
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Essay On The Civil Rights Movement

  • 1. Essay on The Civil Rights Movement The purpose of this essay is to outline the main events of the African–American Civil Rights Movement. Specifically, the focus will be on the main activists involved in the movement such as Martin Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks and the major campaigns of civil resistance. The Civil Rights Movement refers to the movements in the United States aimed at outlawing racial discrimination against African Americans and restoring voting rights in Southern states.African–Americans were able to gain the rights to issues such as equal access to public transportation, right to vote, right to fair trials, and many others. The many movements lasted roughly from 1955 to 1968. During this time African–Americans were constantly degraded and reminded of...show more content... The driver noticed a white man standing and then demanded her entire row move as blacks were forbidden to sit next to whites. After refusing to move, Rosa Parks was reported to the police and arrested for violating the 'whites first' bus laws. Her case was used to fight segregation laws which pushed for complete desegregation on public transport. 50,000 of Montgomery's African Americans supported the boycott which lasted for 381 days until the local ordinance segregating African–Americans and whites on public buses was lifted. Ninety percent of African Americans in Montgomery took part in the boycotts until a federal court ordered Montgomery's buses desegregated in November 1956. Martin Luther King Jr was a prominent leader in the African–American Civil Rights Movement. A baptist minister, he became a civil rights activist early on. The Montgomery Bus Boycott was planned and pursued by fellow activist leader E.D Nixon and soon led by King. During this time King's house was bombed and he was later arrested. The Freedom Rides were journeys taken by Civil Rights activists on interstate buses into the segregated southern states of America. These were organized by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), the first Freedom Ride left Washington D.C. on May 4, 1961. Activists travelled to the highly segregated South and sought to integrate seating and desegregate bus terminals, restrooms and Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 2. The Civil Rights Movement in the 1960’s Essay African Americans have been struggling for equality for many decades. It only seems that during the 1960?s is when there were actual significant advances made. This was about the same time that civil rights came into the political scene. Throughout the South, Blacks were still in the majority, but had no political power what so ever. The Civil Rights Movement gave African Americans a voice and a chance to make a difference. The 1960's helped open up hope and expectations for Black Americans. One of the most prominent men of his time, Martin Luther King Jr. was known as ?A national hero and a civil rights figure of growing importance? (Discovering 1). ?Martin Luther King Jr. aroused whites and blacks to protest racial...show more content... wanted to fight racism with love and Malcolm X wanted blacks to fight back when they were attacked. ?He was one of the most fiery and controversial blacks of the twentieth century? (Discovering 1). ?Malcolm X, was regarded as personifying black nationalism? (Civil 117). ?Malcolm was known for his incisive analysis on the problems of American democracy and the limitations of the intergrationalist Civil Rights Movement? (Civil 116). He believed that black men must reject Western society standards and develop their own society and ethical standards (Colliers 143). He established the Organization of Afro–American Unity. He did this in order to try to unify all the black organizations by fighting white racism (Colliers 143). Malcolm wanted to inform blacks about the cultures that had been taken away from them and the self–hatred the whites had inspired (Discovering 1). He wanted to point them to a better way of life. ?The black power movement to instill pride and a sense of self reliance in the African American community? (Compton's 132). Many organizations helped to throughout the Civil Rights Movement. Many of these organizations were lead by black activist seeking reform. One of the most successful organizations is the NAACP. This stands for the National Association of Colored Advancement. Roy Wilkins was the head of the NAACP during this time (Civil 909). The NAACP purpose was to eliminate racial prejudice by removing racial Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 3. The Civil Rights Movement Essay Johnson: Savior of the Civil Rights Movement? The Civil Rights Movement and President Johnson are closely linked in history. Though there were many other faces to the Civil Rights Movement, Johnson's was one of the most publicly viewed and instrumental in its passing. It was Johnson who carried the weight and responsibilities of the issue after the assassination of JFK, and it was he who would sign it. Lyndon B Johnson was the most influential forces in establishing the movement that would ensure civil rights for black americans. Johnson was a constant and unwavering supporter of civil rights. Without his supreme efforts in establishing civil rights for all, equality would never have come to pass. Lyndon B Johnson was elected ...show more content... Lynching and hate crimes were commonplace, especially down south. America reeked of hatred and fear. Something needed to be done, intolerance had to be abolished, and people needed to learn acceptance. LBJ fully felt the extent of the disfiguration of black americans done by racism. He told his audience that " Ability is stretched or stunted by the family that you live with, and the neighborhood you live in––by the school you go to and the poverty or the richness of your surroundings"(LBJ, speech at HU) meaning that he understood there were people destroyed by racism and people in need of help in order to return to function in society. Johnson acknowledged the hardships of African American people in American society. He let it be understood that what many of them had to put up with was extremely unjust. He once said "The American Negro, acting with impressive restraint, has peacefully protested and marched, entered the courtrooms and the seats of government, demanding a justice that has long been denied" showing his deep respect and a profound admiration for the patience and self restraint shown by black protestors, especially when their white accusers were less than human in their actions. He also understood that his actions Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 4. The Civil Rights Movement Essay The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution form what is known as the Bill of Rights. In essence it is a summary of the basic rights held by all U.S. citizens. However, Negro citizens during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950–70's felt this document and its mandate that guaranteed the civil rights and civil liberties of all people; were interpreted differently for people of color. The freedoms outlined in the Constitution were not enforced the same by the government of the United States for the black race as it did for the white race. "You all treat us so bad," just like we are animals." Those are the words voiced by Mrs. Rosa Parks, a Negro seamstress. Whose refusal to move to the back of the bus and give her seat to a...show more content... In other marches, K–9 units were used to terrorize prospective marchers and police used power water hose to disperse marchers. The force of the water was so powerful that it rolled people down the streets. Massive murders and lynching were not investigated, but considered a necessary item to deter the Negroes and their Movement. Groups such as the Black Panthers were villanized by our government. Unlike the SLNC the Panthers wanted nothing to do with finding a nonviolent solution. Unlike the SLNC they felt you fight violence with violence. The Federal Bureau of Investigation, headed by J. Edgar Hoover made it a priority to disband the Panthers. Yet the Johnson administration allowed the harassment of the Panthers; but, the Klu Klux were allowed to flourish, march in protest–proclaiming White Supremacy and all the while committing hate crimes against Negroes. The injustice of the blatant defiance of the Constitution by the government and by Whites did not begin and end with the segregation of the educational system. It incorporated almost every facet of our society. From Blacks not being served in restaurants, using the same public toilets, and water fountains as Whites to even the military. Blacks were not allowed the basic freedoms that most people under the age of 45–years old, barely comprehend those pass denials to the black race today. The story of Black Americans is mainly Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 5. The Civil Rights Movement Essay "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." – – Martin Luther King, Jr. The Civil rights Movement helped people realize how powerful their voice can be, which changed America completely. One of those people who had a powerful voice was Martin Luther King, Jr. He was an inspiring and influential leader of the Civil Rights Movement. The quote above is just one of many inspirational comments made by Martin Luther King. The peaceful protests against racism, which this African–American man directed, often got responses of violent threats, beatings, and arrests. King stressed how significant it was that the black community would not stoop down to the...show more content... Later to become the first African–American Supreme Court Justice in America, Marshall was the man who argued the "separate but equal" was just a myth trying to cover up racism. Even though it is not a single person, the Little Rock Nine was another contributor to discovering equal rights for African–Americans. This group was the first crowd of blacks to attend Central High School, an all–white school in Little Rock, Arkansas. Being in the Deep South, there was an unbelievable amount of racism. However, these African–American teenagers were determined to stay and be given an equal chance at education as whites received. One day when she was walking into school, Elizabeth Eckford, age fifteen, said Though they had to fight through insults and even death threats, several of the Little Rock Nine students proceeded through high school to get their diploma. Nine African–American students faced a racist system and conquered it. On February 1, 1960, four African–American college students, all freshmen, protested at a "whites only" Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina. They insisted to be served and by doing this, they unintentionally built the foundation for a countrywide movement. After the students sat and politely requested service, the manager of the store came out and asked for them to leave. The next day, several other North Carolina Agricultural and Technical black students joined these freshmen and protested. As the days went Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 6. The Civil Rights Movement Essay "Our problem today is that we have allowed the internal to become lost in the external" –Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Today's world is based on appearance, and most often the goal is not as important as the means by which it is achieved. Why is this such a 'problem?' Time after time, people come to find that they have wasted their lives working towards a goal which, in the end, was never worth all that work to begin with, or they realize that they could have gone about their actions differently. The people ofmodern America are all about living live for the moment, taking risks, not making sacrifices, and never yielding to 'the long run'. Looking at the world of 2015, one can witness the apex of human civilization. Who can...show more content... In September of 1957, at Little Rock High School, crowds of people against the integration of public schools, prevented nine black students from entering the school. What a waste of time that was. Instead of getting so worked up about who goes to what school, people should have stepped down and kept their opinions, and oppositions inside. This is an example of why ?bottling up? emotions is a good thing. It is not necessarily one?s appearance that make others not like him, but the things he says and does. Because of this, it is very hard to believe that white people oppressed blacks solely because of skin color. Oppression is wrong no matter what, but certain actions, and the way they were executed, which blacks took to eliminate segregation may have instead fueled hatred from whites. Sit–ins and bus boycotts are all forms of protest and rebellion, no matter how nonviolent they are. The Rosa Parks bus incident in 1955 is a great example of how two sides can escalate conflict. On one hand Rosa Parks refused to be polite and give up her seat, and started a nationwide boycott against public transportation. On the other hand, some white guy has nothing better to do that complain that he can not sit at the front of the bus. The only thing harder than integrating two races is integrating two races when one side is opposed. Due to, once again internal principles and beliefs (as earlier discussed in this Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 7. The Civil Rights Movement was a pivotal time in American history, leading us toward the acceptance and advancement of African Americans in society, and eventually the same for other minority groups. The movement as a whole spanned from around the beginning of the 1950's to around the beginning of the 1970's. All across the nation, African American people fought for their rights through numerous protests and boycotts. Some notable events are the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the March on Washington, and the Greensboro lunch counter sit–ins. Many forms of legislation and many judiciary decisions were made during this era, such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and 1968, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown v. Board of Education ("A Timeline of the Civil Rights Movement FOOTSTEPS OF COURAGE"). This movement is extremely well documented when it comes to all kinds of sources, such as photographs, diaries, interviews, and videos. Many of these sources are housed in Wilson Library, some of which are very intriguing and carry messages that are still relevant to this day. One noteworthy photograph I discovered is one of a group of protestors on Franklin Street. The photograph was taken by an unknown photographer and it was taken in December of 1963. The group stands firmly in front of the post office; a landmark on Franklin Street, which is now known as Peace and Justice Plaza. It was named this because it is where protest marches would end and where a memorial plaque was placed for the Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 8. Essay About The Civil Rights Movement The Reconstruction after the Civil War was meant to rebuild Southern government and society, but failed to bring equality to African Americans. The civil rights movement after World War II worked to bring this necessary justice to all men. The civil rights movement worked to fix America's problem of inequality based on race, and succeeded where the Reconstruction had failed. After the end of World War II, the civil rights movement spread across America. This movement began in the northern United States, and over time spread to the historically racist South. There, people like Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr. sparked protests and launched campaigns, bringing to attention the people's desire for equality. Over time, this movement allowed...show more content... However, in 1896, the case of Plessy v. Ferguson ruled that segregation of races was constitutional, as long as "separate but equal" facilities were provided. This resulted in public facilities in the South – such as buses, restaurants, and schools – becoming isolated based off of race. During the civil rights movement, people worked to desegregate public establishments so that they could be used by everyone. In 1954, Chief Justice Warren ruled in the case of Brown v. Board of Education that "...in the field of public education the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal..." (Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts). Schools in the South, especially the Deep South, resisted desegregation, but eventually had to comply with the court's ruling. The Montgomery bus boycott, sparked by Rosa Parks's arrest for sitting in the "whites only" section of a public bus, lasted for over a year in from 1955 to 1956. Sit–ins began occurring in 1960, in which African Americans sat in restaurants, demanding service despite the fact these areas were segregated. Both of these events brought attention to the unfairness of segregation, and slowly public facilities worked to desegregate. The increase of awareness of the inequality that separate facilities brought was successful in making services accessible to Americans of all Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 9. The Civil Rights Movement: Freedom Rides Essay During the Civil Rights Movement, African Americans sought to have their Constitutional Rights permitted. One form of protesting came forth in the form of the Freedom Rides. After slavery ended, many amendments and laws were created to ensure the rights of African Americans, but because of prejudices and racism, most of these were ignored. The Supreme Court's decision in Plessy v. Fergunson established "separate but equal" on interstate transportation in 1896, but in 1947 the Supreme Court found it unconstitutional. And although segregation was outlawed, Jim Crow laws still ruled the Deep South and "codified in law, sanctioned by the courts, and enforced by the ubiquitous threat of physical violence even more than legal reprisal" (Catsam...show more content... This belief soon changed because women became the core of the Civil Rights Movement, especially Diane Nash. She was, "One of the leaders of the Nashville Movement, was one of the foremost figures when students took over the freedom rides after violence caused the original CORE group to call the project to an end in Birmingham" (93). Freedom Rides became influential in changing people's mindsets because they noticed how the students involved and how they were treated. The students were carefully trained in nonviolence, a "technique require[d] that a participant not strike anyone, not even to save himself/herself or a group member from a beating" (Olds 18). Although the students used the passive approach, trouble still awaited them. Once in Montgomery Alabama, furious crowds surrounded them screaming "GIT them niggers! GIT them niggers!" (Lewis 158). They were attacked, beat and bled a great deal. Not only did the Freedom Riders get assaulted, but journalists who covered their stories were also targeted. Ultimately, "If you had a pencil or a pad, or a camera, you were in real trouble" (Morrison 29). Though successful, when Freedom Rides were first introduced, many civil rights leaders didn't want to take part of it, because of doubt concerning their overall effectiveness. Civil rights leaders believed Freedom Rides would hold up the Movement, but over time they became one of the largest and most supported movements during the Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 10. Summary: The Civil Rights Movement Although the Civil Rights Movement hasgarneredmuchpublicawarenessandsympathy since it first picked up steam in thelate1950s,itsgoalsareyettobefullyrealized.Thedays where segregation laws prevailed in schools, workplaces, and the like are long past, but its effects still linger today. From a political perspective, blacks' voices are greater than ever before, with a voting turnout surpassing those of white Americans' in the 2012 presidential election, and 10,500 black officialscurrentlyservingthegovernment.Financial,educational, and social equality, however, remain an elusive Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 11. The Civil Rights Movement Essay Many changes occurred during the late 1950s into the early 1960s in the goals, strategies, and support of the movement for African American civil rights. Many strides were made for racial equality in the United States. However, while changes were made, they did take a considerable amount of time to achieve. This made some leaders of the civil rights movement frustrated and caused them to divert from their original goal of integration. They instead strove for black separatism where blacks and whites would live segregated. The civil rights movement started in 1955 with the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Rosa Parks, a black woman, sat in the front of a public Montgomery bus. According to the Jim Crow laws...show more content... The student would continue to politely recite his or her lines until the police showed up. The student would be arrested for violating the Jim Crow laws. However, the commotion caused by the police caused the restaurants to lose business. For this reason, restaurant owners were forced to desegregate their lunch counters. This process exemplified the strategy of SNCC. In a statement released in 1960, the organization stated its method for achieving civil rights. They believed in nonviolence to help their goal of integration. They wanted t be equal with the white man. They wanted to be able to do everything white people could do. Blacks did not want to be separated from whites, they wanted to be together and equal. Stokley Carmichael exercised these beliefs in his civil rights movements. The lunch counter sit–ins were non–violent and they succeeded in their purpose to integrate the lunch counters of the South. However, change came to slow for Stokley Carmichael. He became frustrated as stated in the introduction. He changed his beliefs of non–violence and integration to violence and black separatism. In a statement entitled "What We Want" released in 1966 by Stokley Carmichael, he said that blacks should join together and form their own society. This was reverting back to Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 12. Causes And Effects Of The Civil Rights Movement The Civil Rights Movement and the Effects We have all heard about this movement, the major events that have taken place, and its magnificent leaders. However, what is meant by civil rights? What does this term refer to? Civil rights have been defined as the nonpolitical rights of citizens, in particular, the personal freedom of US citizens guaranteed by the laws passed by Congress, as well as amendments to US Constitution No. 13, and14. (Miriam Webster Dictionary). The term civil rights have been defined as all citizenship rights from actions and decisions taken by the government to create equal and guaranteed living circumstances for all citizens, In specific, the Constitution Amendments No. 13, 14, 15, 19, and 26. (Barbour 2014 p.133). Though this movement existed throughout the 19th century, it spread quickly until it reached its peak between the 1950's and 1960's. It was aimed at getting black Americans (Africans) the rights and privileges of equality and citizenship without racism. This was done through large campaigns of nonviolent demonstrations, negotiations, civil disobedience and all legal means. The movement was focused in the south, where there was considerable disparity in education, health care, economics, and so forth. However, how did it all start? There were many events that had been taken place, which were the cause of this movement to be peaked. Some events were (Sparks) short–term like Emmett Till, Rosa Parks, Mal. X, and M. L. King. Some Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 13. "Black Lives Matter (BLM) is a movement against police violence that is, as argued by BLM supporters, disproportionately and systematically directed at black people. The movement has highlighted incidents in which police have harassed and killed black men and women. BLM is considered one of the most visible and controversial civil rights movement of the last decades". (Black Lives Matter. 2016) Black Lives Matter is an American social activist group that is dedicated to preventing inequality against African Americans. The group was established in 2013 after a cop by the name of George Zimmerman was found not guilty of killing a black man named Trayvon Martin. The group feels that blacks are being targeted by cops and that justice is not being served, regarding those cops who show violence toward black Americans. In the sixties, African Americans began a Civil Rights Movement that, to some, continue today; hence, the Black Lives Matter movement. During the sixties, the main consensus for the Civil Rights Movement was through nonviolent direct action. Martin Luther King Jr. believed that, through nonviolence, African Americans could conquer their main objectives. King and other activists were able to accomplish many goals; they had a real purpose and one that was worth fighting for. Yet, with all the progress made since the sixties, does "Black Lives Matter" still have a reasonable purpose, or is this movement doing more harm than good? Barbara Reynolds, a Civil Rights Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 14. The Civil Rights Movement Essay Civil Rights are those rights that guarantee to all individuals by the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th Amendments of the U.S Constitution, as the right to vote and the right to equal treatment under the law (Agnes 121). The Civil Rights Era (1954–1973) was a time of racism, discrimination, protests for equality, and gained momentum to overcome horrific obstacles. This time period was inspired by African–Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and any other citizen that was against what forms of discrimination there was at the time (Appleby 820). The teaching of Civil Rights to students is imperative, especially to African–American Students. Segregation is the policy of compelling racial groups to live apart and use separate schools, ...show more content... Later on, he became the first African–American appointed to the Supreme Court in 1967. Through this lead, the NAACP is how "Mr. Civil Rights" as they call him won over the class act Brown v. Board of Education (Sharp 91–96). Even though he won the case the fight for education did not stop there. Now that segregated education was supposedly won, there were still some deep blemishes in this action. On December 1, 1955, a seamstress of the NAACP, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to move out of her seat for a white person when asked. She was later arrested for not doing so. After arrested and set free the issue could have ended there; however, it did not. Rosa Parks' arrest led to a history making movement, the Montgomery Bus Boycott. This movement was put in place to put a dent in the cities financial policies. As significance, all African–Americans pulled together and stopped using the city buses; as well as, car pulling and walking. (Appleby 824) With the victory of the Montgomery Boycott, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. became a leader of the civil rights movement (Appleby 825). He was a leader that chose to use nonviolent retaliations; such as Mohandas Gandhi, his influencer. In January 1957, Dr. King and sixty other ministers started an organization called the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and Dr. King was the president–elect. The SCLC prepared Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 15. The Civil Rights Movement (1955- 1965) Essay Civil Rights Movement in the United States, was a political, legal, and social struggle to gain full citizenship rights for African Americans and to achieve racial equality. The civil rights movement was a challenge to segregation, the system of laws and customs separating blacks and whites. During the civil rights movement, individuals and organizations challenged segregation and discrimination with a variety of activities, including protest marches, boycotts, and refusal to abide by segregation laws. Some believe that the movement began with the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 and ended with the Voting RightsAct of 1965, there is still however some debate about when it began and whether it has ended yet. The civil rights movement...show more content... Segregated facilities were not as common in the North, but blacks were usually denied entrance to the best hotels and restaurants. Schools in New England were usually integrated, but those in the Midwest generally were not. The most difficult part of Northern life was the intense economic discrimination against blacks. Blacks fought against discrimination whenever possible. In the late 1800s blacks sued in courts to put an end to separate seating in railroad cars, states disfranchisement of voters, and denial of access to schools and restaurants. One of the cases against segregation was Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896, in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that separate but equal accommodations were constitutional. To protest segregation, blacks created new national organizations. The National Afro–American League, in 1890; the Niagara Movement in 1905; and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909. The NAACP became one of the most important black protest organizations of the 20th century. The historian and sociologist W. E. B. Du Bois was one of the early leaders of the NAACP. In the postwar years, the NAACP's legal strategy for civil rights continued to succeed. They were now led by Thurgood Marshall. The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on five cases that challenged elementary– and secondary–school segregation, and in May Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 16. The Civil Rights Movement Essay The civil rights movement was a span of time when the African Americans endeavor was to acquire their constitutional rights of which they were being deprived. A commendable bearing of the civil rights movement was the unachievable triumph that the blacks sought after and built. Through courage, persistence, and determination, the African Americans won their independence (enotes, 2010). The civil rights evolution was a period when society was oppressed for many years, rose up against the disadvantage and accomplished their freedom. Many were unsettled with the way the civil rights movement was being toted out in the 1960's (Marable, 1992). As a consequence, someone assassinated the leader of the crusade; Dr.Martin Luther King Jr....show more content... The decrease of support for the Vietnam War began in 1968. Despite the antiwar activity in theUnited States that had been existing before, the Tat Offensive opened the eyes of numberless people. Some people continued to be highly supportive of the war and firmly trusted that if the South fell to communism, the Domino Theory would incur (Ellis, 1969). Some started to dispute the motives behind the US government's sharing in Vietnam. They arrived proclaiming to be fighting for freedom, democracy and independence but the governance that they were supporting in South Vietnam was anything but equality and therefore it was immoral to support them. Some deemed that the Vietnam War needed transparent objectives. The foundation of the 1960's had a distinctive bearing in the social history of United States and the opinion of the people. Martin Luther King conducted a non–violent protest for the civil rights movement that was a period for people who were burdened for many years to emerge against their odds and gain their freedom. Over time there have been many admirable protestors who have made meaningful changes to the manner in which the world is today, some for the better and some for the worse. One of the most operative and consequential protestors was a man by the name of Martin Luther King Jr. He had monumental courage and passion to vanquish segregation and racism that existed in the United States Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 17. Causes and Effects of the Civil Rights Movement By: Christal Mcwhorter The Civil Rights Movement has changed all of American's lives for ever. The Civil Rights Movement is a big event and according to Eyes on the Prize. "The March on Washington on August 28, 1963." The reason why was because the African Americans were tired of being oppressed and being treated differently. One cause is segregation and this is where people are divided or split up. One more cause is violence/abuse is where people are treated badly like being punched or even being bullied basically or it is where someone is getting hurt in a certain process. One after effect is integration, and it is where people are being put together so being combined. Integration is an after effect of the Civil Rights Movement and it made things fair for African Americans because this gave them a chance to interact better with the Americans and they got better jobs and they were put as equals finally because of integration. To begin with there was segregation, separation, and just being divided up from each other. African Americans were separated by schools even stores and just normal shops, and they were separated even by public bathrooms. Also an example of segregation and according to the autobiography Leon's Story. "We had to sit up in the balcony. The whites sat at the...show more content... Integration is an effect of the Civil Rights Movement. This is a good thing for the African Americans because they did not have to go with anything bad like schools that did not have the proper items needed. Another effect of integration is African Americans were able to vote. Also they were able to get the same jobs so better paying jobs or a better salary. This was a great thing because no one was unequal anymore. Something else about integration is, ever since the big oppression against African Americans stopped people have been much Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 18. Essay on The Civil Rights Movement The civil rights movement comprised efforts of grassroots activists and national leaders to obtain for African Americans the basic rights guaranteed to American citizens in the Constitution. The key players in succeeding with the civil rights movement were the soldiers returning from the war, Martin Luther King Jr, Malcolm X, The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and the anti–Vietnam War activists. During the civil rights movement, nearly every African American had experienced segregation at lunch stands. In a Journal by Melvin Small, she stated, "Just as with the segregated buses in Montgomery, Alabama the African–American community, especially the segment of college students, had once again reached its saturation...show more content... College students and lower grade black students helped to stand up against the racial cruelty. Although the war was taking place, students across the nation took advantage of it by protesting nonviolent for justice. This was just a small piece of the puzzle for justice in the United States because the black soldiers played an even bigger role in the success of the movement. Soldiers of WWII had a substantial impact on the civil rights movement. In the book, A Breath of Freedom, it stated, "During World War II the African American population pushed for equality and integration of the United States military, which, at the time, remained in accordance with the culture and customs of the white majority by keeping the two races segregated (HГ¶hn)." The term, separate but equal, made famous by the United States Supreme Court case Plessy vs. Ferguson remained instantiated as the law to abide by in reference to racial policy (HГ¶hn). This concept of keeping both races segregated had permeated across the United States and was the prominent view of most white citizens during this period. Segregation was seen from a white point–of–view as a way for both races to live within the society without racial conflict and tension. Separation of blacks and whites stretched across all societal institutions, including the United States Military. During the closing years of World War II and increasingly thereafter, African American GIs (Government Issued) complained Get more content on HelpWriting.net
  • 19. The Rise Of The Civil Rights Movement In 1960, there were tremendous of social ferment that was responsible for agitation and protest. Through direct protest, many African Americans, women, and homosexuals were able to gain recognition and break down the walls of discrimination and segregations. Out of the numerous elements that arose in the 1960s, there are three movements that truly affected the American society. Firstly, the rise of the civil rights movement was greatly influenced by racial discrimination of colored people in the South. Secondly, the women's movement aimed to convince the society that women are capable of achieving and maintaining higher waged job like males. Lastly, the gay rights movement aimed to gain acceptance and stop discrimination of homosexuality. The most significant effect on the development of American society was the women's movement and how they expanded their economic and political opportunities. The common goal among African Americans, women's, and homosexuals was to obtain their equal rights as citizens of America and to desegregate all the boundaries between white and black population. The civil rights movement was one of the main elements that were responsible for agitation and protest that greatly expanded in the 1960s. This social movement "originated among black Americans in the South who faced racial discrimination and segregation, or the separation of whites and blacks, in almost every aspect of their lives" ("Protests in the 1960s," 3). There was constant racial Get more content on HelpWriting.net