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Design Sprint Workshop

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Design Sprint Workshop

  1. 1. Design Sprint Workshop
  2. 2. Chris Tucker HELLO my name is problem solving addict project manager design sprint facilitator chris.tucker@freshtilledsoil.com
  3. 3. Challenge 1 High five everyone in the room. IN 60 SECONDS
  4. 4. Challenge 2 Make everyone happy. IN 60 SECONDS
  5. 5. YOU ARE HERE YOU WANT TO BE HEREMAKE EVERYONE HAPPY HIGH-FIVE EVERYONE DESIGN PROBLEM ENGINEERING PROBLEM
  6. 6. talk do talk 8:45 11:45 Agenda
  7. 7. ○Write BIG and with a Sharpie/marker ○Everybody participates ○All voices equal ○Be timely ○Be comfortable ○Have fun! Rules of Conduct
  8. 8. DS101
  9. 9. A Design Sprint is a flexible design framework that increases the chances of making something people want. What is a Design Sprint?
  10. 10. Design Sprint Approach UNDERSTAND Clarify and focus on the problem to solve DIVERGE Generate solutions to the identified problem CONVERGE Select which solutions are best to move forward BUILD Create a low-cost prototype to test with potential users TEST Test the prototype with users and debrief ✓ X ?
  11. 11. Make Things People Want Make People Want Things > (or Need)
  12. 12. Design Sprint SCIENTIFIC METHOD DESIGN PROCESS AGILE PHILOSOPHY Rigorous Experimental Hypothesis Driven Continuous Improvement Collaborative Responsive Human Centered Creative Divergent
  13. 13. DESIRABILITY FEASIBILITY PROFITABILITY we can create they’ll pay enough for thi$$$$ DESIGN SPRINTS WORK BEST AT DETERMINING DESIRABILITY t h i sthis somebody wants
  14. 14. BIG (SOMETIMES SCARY) IDEAS ARE BEST FOR TESTING IN DESIGN SPRINTS
  15. 15. DATA CAN BE USEFUL BUT OFTEN TIMES ONLY LOOKS BACK AND DOESN’T TELL THE WHOLE STORY
  16. 16. EVIDENCE-BASED DECISION MAKING OVER HIGHEST PAID PERSON’S OPINION
  17. 17. DESIGN SPRINTS ARE ALL ABOUT ANSWERS. PROTOTYPES ARE MADE BUT ARE USUALLY DESTROYED AFTERWARDS.
  18. 18. When you skip steps or pace it out, insights get shallow, ideas get dim, and momentum is lost. FIVE CONSECUTIVE DAYS ALLOWS FOR FOCUS AND DEPTH If your job can survive a 5-day vacation, it will thrive after a 5-day Design Sprint! * Importance of Time
  19. 19. Who should be in the room? The best information comes from the least likely characters. ORGANIZATIONAL DIVERSITY IS KEY }
  20. 20. Start with Context We can work with your team to make sure you’ve got enough information to hit the ground running. Data can be collected from (potential) user interviews and market data. PRE-SPRINT RESEARCH IS IMPORTANT
  21. 21. Questions?
  22. 22. Southwest Airlines has found that customer satisfaction is significantly higher on flights leaving from top rated airports like Phoenix or Portland. Boston is ranked 18 out of 30 (best to worst). Southwest has hired the fresh tilled soil extension team (you!) to create fresh new ideas for improving the experience of flying out of Boston Logan, from the moment passengers leave their home/ hotel to the moment the plane takes off. Their hypothesis is that if a passenger is already unhappy from the pre-flight experience, it is more difficult for them to achieve high satisfaction rating. Team Challenge
  23. 23. Day 1: Understand
  24. 24. Who are you designing for? What is know vs. a guess? What is the problem?
  25. 25. to identify riskiest assumptions to focus on for the remainder of the design sprint Assumption Storming PURPOSE OUTPUT INSTRUCTIONS 1. On your own, write down what you know or think you know about the topic (one idea per post-it) 2. Place onto quadrant: importance vs. confidence 3. As a group, discuss overlapping assumptions and placement IMPORTANCE CONFIDENCE 10 minutes
  26. 26. to compose a better understanding of who the stakeholders is and what compels them Empathy Mapping 1. As a group, fill in content for the following sections of your empathy map: ○ think (+/-) ○ feel PURPOSE OUTPUT INSTRUCTIONS ○ says ○ see ○ need/frustration 10 minutes
  27. 27. PERSONA
  28. 28. JOURNEY MAP
  29. 29. to define the root problems we will ideate upon and work to solve through the rest of the sprint Problem Statement PURPOSE OUTPUT 5 minutes INSTRUCTIONS 1. On your own, write down your answer the question: What are we trying to solve for? 2. Share and categorize the problem statements by theme 3. Explore and discuss how different themes might connect (PROBLEM STATEMENT HERE)
  30. 30. Title (H1) Problem Solution Water on the floor Mop WHY? Leaky pipe Fix pipe WHY? Too much pressure Lower pressure WHY? Pressure regulator Replace regulator WHY? Maintenance schedule More frequent inspection
  31. 31. PROBLEM
  32. 32. Day 2: Diverge
  33. 33. How many different ideas can we create?
  34. 34. to further clarify what your users are trying to accomplish Job Stories PURPOSE OUTPUT 1. On your own, select a top need from your Empathy Map (usually from your Journey Map) 2. Fill in the blanks to the statement below to create a job story for your chosen need ○ When ____________, I want to ___________________, so that ______________. 3. As a group, share and discuss job statements INSTRUCTIONS (situation) (motivation or desire) (outcome) WHEN_______ I WANT______ SO THAT____ WHEN_______ I WANT______ SO THAT____ WHEN_______ I WANT______ SO THAT____ WHEN_______ I WANT______ SO THAT____ WHEN_______ I WANT______ SO THAT____ WHEN_______ I WANT______ SO THAT____ WHEN_______ I WANT______ SO THAT____ WHEN_______ I WANT______ SO THAT____ 5 minutes
  35. 35. 1. Fold a piece of paper into 6 boxes (2 x 3) 2. Draw a different idea of how to solve for your job story in each box (60 seconds per box!) 3. As a group, share, post on a wall, and note interesting ideas to produce many possible solutions for a single pain point Six-Ups PURPOSE OUTPUT INSTRUCTIONS It doesn't have to be pretty, just get the ideas out in sketches and even a few words. And no screens, we’re not wire framing yet. 10 minutes
  36. 36. Generate More Ideas Inspiration What are your favorite solutions/experiences? Bi-pass Is there a way to eliminate the situation before it happens? Socio Environmental What are some loosely related issues that are underserved? Go To The Impossible How would you use magic to solve this?
  37. 37. STORYBOARDS
  38. 38. to determine top ideas for testing $100 Test PURPOSE OUTPUT 1. Each participant gets “$100” 2. On your own, invest “$” on assumptions that are critical and need validation (minimum $5 increments) 3. Tally the “$” totals 4. Determine winning idea INSTRUCTIONS $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ VOTE
  39. 39. Day 3: Converge
  40. 40. Which idea is best to test?
  41. 41. tough on people *ideas
  42. 42. to visualize individual interpretations of possible solutions Individual Sketching PURPOSE OUTPUT 1. Either on the whiteboard or on large post-its, draw a picture of what your version of a possible solution looks like 2. The goal is that others will understand your solution without too much explanation so don’t shy away from providing detail and context INSTRUCTIONS 30-60 minutes NOW you get to wireframe. Finally!
  43. 43. to receive unfiltered feedback on first draft sketches Ritual Discent PURPOSE OUTPUT 1. Select a participant to present their sketch (2 minutes only!) ○ No comments or questions from the group 2. Group mates provide critical feedback (3 minutes only!) ○ Presenter turns around and takes notes (listening only - cannot respond) 3. Presenter responds to the group with “Thank You” 4. Repeat until everyone has presented and received feedback INSTRUCTIONS 5 minutes per presenter THEY LIKED… THIS WAS UNCLEAR… THIS COULD USE SOME LOVE…
  44. 44. Types of Feedback REACTIVE DIRECTIVE CRITIQUE
  45. 45. Types of Feedback REACTIVE DIRECTIVE CRITIQUE Oh my, that is horrible! A drunken parakeet could do better. That’s great, I love it!!
  46. 46. Types of Feedback REACTIVE DIRECTIVE CRITIQUE You should have… I would have…
  47. 47. Types of Feedback REACTIVE DIRECTIVE CRITIQUE If this objective is to make users consider their bank balance… Tell me where you are in your design process.. ..Isn’t effective because it’ll get lost
  48. 48. Day 4: Prototype
  49. 49. Create a sharable version of your idea.
  50. 50. to define how your team will test critical assumptions during the Test phase Assumption Matching PURPOSE OUTPUT 1. Select 3 relevant assumptions 2. For each define: ○ TEST question - how you will test to determine if the assumption is valid or not ○ VALID IF - success criteria that determines if the assumption is valid INSTRUCTIONS 60 minutes ASSUMPTIONS TEST ? VALID IF
  51. 51. PRE-PROTO QUESTIONS to understand testers’ current habits and pain points (unbiased) ACTIONS tasks you want the user to attempt to complete (connected to a feature) POST-PROTO QUESTIONS to understand testers’ impression and applicability of the prototype (wrap-up) 1 2 3
  52. 52. Types of Prototypes PHYSICAL DIGITAL SERVICE Interactive model Lanscape model Experience diorama
  53. 53. photo credit: Field Innovation Team
  54. 54. Types of Prototypes PHYSICAL DIGITAL SERVICE Paper flip chart Interactive sketches Interactive static screens Video
  55. 55. 65 Lo Hi Interactive Fidelity Hi
  56. 56. Types of Prototypes PHYSICAL SERVICEDIGITAL Concept Model Scenario Role-Playing Physical Model
  57. 57. Day 5: Test
  58. 58. Get (in)validation.
  59. 59. CAPTURE
  60. 60. DETERMINE RESULTS
  61. 61. Interviewing 101
  62. 62. ○ Let them describe what they see. DON’T explain. ○ Embrace awkward silence. Let them break before you do. ○ It’s not about you. This is not a promotional opportunity. ○ Be interested, not interesting. ○ Wear a poker face. Don’t express emotion to responses. Listening Principles
  63. 63. ○ Ask open ended questions; never yes/no. Would you use this? Can you tell me a scenario in which you might use this? What, if anything, might prompt you to use this? How frequently, if ever, do you think you might use this? ○ Keep asking “Why?”. Don’t settle for vague answers. Speaking Principles
  64. 64. PRE-PROTO QUESTIONS to understand testers’ current habits and pain points (unbiased) ACTIONS tasks you want the user to attempt to complete (connected to a feature) POST-PROTO QUESTIONS to understand testers’ impression and applicability of the prototype (wrap-up) 1 2 3
  65. 65. After the Design Sprint
  66. 66. X ?IT WORKED! INVALIDATED UNANSWERED QUESTIONS First Possible Outcome
  67. 67. Assumptions Prototype Test Learn
  68. 68. X ?VALIDATED UNANSWERED QUESTIONS Second Possible Outcome IT DOESN’T WORK?
  69. 69. DON’T PANIC YOU JUST SAVED TIME, FACE, MONEY
  70. 70. ?VALIDATED UNANSWERED QUESTIONS Third Possible Outcome XINVALIDATED
  71. 71. What is right? *Who
  72. 72. What is right? the timing
  73. 73. } } } DESIGN SPRINT INTERVALS AGILE DEVELOPMENT WEEK 1 Refine Build Test WEEK 2 Refine Build Test WEEK 3 Refine Build Test WEEK 4 Refine Build Test WEEK n Understand Diverge Prototype Test Converge
  74. 74. freshtilledsoil.com/blog
  75. 75. Hopes & Fears Goal & Anti-Goal Who / Do Persona Design User Journey Map Experience Map Problem Reframe Daily Retrospective Pitch Practice Parking Lot Job-Stories Challenge Map Mind Map Silent Critique $100 Test Service Blueprint Sprint Debrief {
  76. 76. “The wisdom that you get from understanding a customer’s pain, is never something you need to backpedal on, it’s never something that you pivot on. That’s irrefutable knowledge.” David E. Weekly GOOGLE

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