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Difficult Second Album Syndrome

Difficult Second Album Syndrome

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When we're creating content-driven PR or link building campaigns we’re often either trying to replicate our own successes, or we’re trying to replicate the successes of others. We often fail, but we don't always know why.

Here Hannah explores some of the reasons why we fail, and shares stories about some of the campaign "hits" and "misses" she's experienced.

Originally presented by Hannah Smith at Drink Digital in March 2021.

When we're creating content-driven PR or link building campaigns we’re often either trying to replicate our own successes, or we’re trying to replicate the successes of others. We often fail, but we don't always know why.

Here Hannah explores some of the reasons why we fail, and shares stories about some of the campaign "hits" and "misses" she's experienced.

Originally presented by Hannah Smith at Drink Digital in March 2021.

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Difficult Second Album Syndrome

  1. 1. difficult second album syndrome Hannah Smith Worderist.com
  2. 2. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “You’ve a lifetime to make your first album, but only a year or two to make your second” (so the saying goes)
  3. 3. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com This is often touted as the excuse for that “difficult second album” a topic we explored in 2015 for Concert Hotels
  4. 4. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Back then, the data seemed to suggest that if your first album is well-received then your second album probably won't be:
  5. 5. difficult second album syndrome Hannah Smith Worderist.com
  6. 6. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Cute… But so what?
  7. 7. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Difficult Second Album Syndrome isn’t unique to music artists
  8. 8. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I think it probably affects everyone
  9. 9. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Today I’m focusing on why this might be a challenge for people who create content with the objective of securing links and coverage
  10. 10. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Time is part of the reason that this stuff is hard: “You’ve a lifetime to make your first album, but only a year or two to make your second”
  11. 11. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Although when it comes to commercial creative work our timelines are even tighter than that
  12. 12. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We’re probably looking at something more like this: “You’ve a handful of chances to make your first successful thinger, and only a month or two to make your second”
  13. 13. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But it’s not just time that we’re working against...
  14. 14. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Artist Christoph Niemann has suggested success might actually make things more difficult:
  15. 15. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “I actually think [success] is a burden… because I feel like: well, now I have to repeat this” ~Christoph Niemann, artist, author, & animator. More on this here:https://worderist.com/2019/07/03/sunday-sketches-by-christoph-niemann/
  16. 16. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com If you’ve ever created a successful piece you’ll likely be able to relate to that feeling
  17. 17. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But even if you haven’t made a piece that was successful yet, you’ll probably have experienced something like this:
  18. 18. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “See this thinger that someone else made - it got loads of coverage, why aren’t we seeing success like that?”
  19. 19. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com As a result, I think that difficult second album syndrome has the potential to affect everyone
  20. 20. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Even if you’ve not yet had your first big “hit”
  21. 21. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Because on some level we’re all under the same pressure:
  22. 22. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We’re often either trying to replicate our own successes, or we’re trying to replicate the successes of others
  23. 23. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com we often fail but we don’t always know why
  24. 24. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & perhaps, as a result, self-doubt can start creeping in
  25. 25. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com whenever I begin to doubt myself, a little voice in my head pipes up:
  26. 26. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “you're not good enough, and those past successes were just a fluke”
  27. 27. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Maybe your little voice tells you something different
  28. 28. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Maybe you don’t have a little voice like that in your head at all
  29. 29. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But a lot of us do
  30. 30. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Over the years I’ve tried a bunch of things to quiet that little voice:
  31. 31. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’ve tried to ignore it
  32. 32. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com didn’t work
  33. 33. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’ve attempted to argue with it by seeking out hard evidence to the contrary: here are a bunch of things I’ve done which prove I am good at this stuff; they can’t possibly all be flukes
  34. 34. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com didn’t work
  35. 35. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’ve got angry at myself for listening to that little voice
  36. 36. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com that definitely didn’t work - actually it made me feel much worse
  37. 37. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com this is not a recipe for a happy life & it makes it much harder to do good work
  38. 38. This year I’ve been doing a course with this absolute Queen https://roar.training/confidence-now/
  39. 39. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & Kirsty suggested doing something a little different
  40. 40. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “Listen to that little voice & have a think about what it’s trying to tell you”
  41. 41. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com here’s what I think my little voice is trying to tell me:
  42. 42. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “You keep on trying to make these things, and they don’t always work, and then you feel bad about yourself. Don’t you think you’d feel better about yourself if you just stopped doing these things?”
  43. 43. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com When things aren’t going well I do sometimes think: would I be happier if I didn’t do this job?
  44. 44. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com but deep down I know that doing something other than what I’m doing right now would actually make me less happy
  45. 45. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & I have a better relationship with the voice in my head now
  46. 46. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com It’s still not quiet, and I don’t think it ever will be
  47. 47. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But now I understand what it’s trying to tell me, I don’t feel the need to try to argue with it, or get angry with myself about it
  48. 48. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Being less preoccupied with that little voice has made it easier for me to do my work
  49. 49. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com If you have a similar little voice, maybe trying that exercise will help you too :)
  50. 50. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Ok, that’s enough about the little voice in my head...
  51. 51. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We’re all under much the same pressure:
  52. 52. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We’re often either trying to replicate our own successes, or we’re trying to replicate the successes of others
  53. 53. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com we often fail but we don’t always know why
  54. 54. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Today I’m going to explore why we fail (or, more accurately, why I think we fail)
  55. 55. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Let’s do this :)
  56. 56. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com If we’re seeking to recreate the success of another piece, first we need to understand why the original piece was successful
  57. 57. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & we think we ought to be pretty good at this
  58. 58. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com because we’re programmed to spot patterns
  59. 59. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com the trouble is, our ability to spot patterns doesn’t necessarily serve us well
  60. 60. I think “Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel” is a great example of this:
  61. 61. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com In 2013 Elisa Lam, a young Canadian traveller, goes missing, and is eventually found dead at the hotel
  62. 62. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But what happened to her?
  63. 63. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “internet sleuths” came up with a range of theories:
  64. 64. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com she was killed by a Mexican death metal singer, she was the victim of a copycat killing inspired by the 2005 horror flick Dark Water, she was involved in an international conspiracy to spread a new strain of tuberculosis...
  65. 65. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com All of those theories were based on patterns that were spotted
  66. 66. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com trouble is, those patterns were just coincidences
  67. 67. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com we are great at spotting patterns BUT we find it much harder to distinguish whether or not those patterns are meaningful
  68. 68. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Perhaps you think that you are immune...
  69. 69. You know Nicholas Cage films do not cause people to drown in swimming pools
  70. 70. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com That still might not protect you
  71. 71. Meet Will Critchlow - he’s smart, right?
  72. 72. Back in 2015 a bunch of us at Distilled were fascinated by the success of this piece
  73. 73. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I don’t think that “BEER” was the reason this piece was successful...
  74. 74. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com If “beer” was the reason, then every piece about beer would be successful & that’s definitely not the case
  75. 75. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com The trouble is, we often absorb thinking like this...
  76. 76. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com sensemaking The process by which people give meaning to their collective experiences, an idea introduced by Karl Weick in 1979.
  77. 77. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Sensemaking is not just about how individuals make sense of things, it’s about how organisations (or groups of people) make sense of things
  78. 78. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Weick noted: People favour plausibility over accuracy in accounts of events and contexts
  79. 79. When thinking about why a piece was successful, we’re often guilty of jumping quickly to a plausible explanation, then moving on
  80. 80. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But one person, getting one thing a bit wrong shouldn’t be a problem, right?
  81. 81. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Sensemaking is a social activity: plausible stories are preserved, retained, & shared
  82. 82. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We absorb these plausible stories & they affect the way we interpret future events
  83. 83. If we accept that “beer” is the reason this piece is successful...
  84. 84. What happens when we see another successful piece about beer?
  85. 85. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We see a successful piece We conclude “beer” is the reason it’s successful We see another successful piece We notice it’s about beer too THERE’S A PATTERN! All future successful pieces we encounter about beer add “evidence” to support this explanation
  86. 86. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I see this happening in a lot of directions
  87. 87. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com What else do these two piece have in common?
  88. 88. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Both maps...
  89. 89. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We see a successful piece We conclude it’s successful because it’s a map We see another successful piece We notice it’s a map too THERE’S A PATTERN! All future successful pieces we encounter which are maps add “evidence” to support this explanation
  90. 90. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But again, if that was true then every map-based piece would be successful & that’s definitely not the case
  91. 91. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com These explanations are both easy to debunk
  92. 92. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & I’m sure that most of you don’t think “beer” or “map” is the only reason those pieces were successful
  93. 93. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com perhaps you’d tell me it’s also because: “they offer journalists something that they don’t have the time or resource to create themselves”
  94. 94. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & I’d acknowledge that yes, that’s true
  95. 95. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com The trouble is I’ve made several pieces about resonant topics (like beer), which offered journalists something they don’t have the time or resource to create themselves...
  96. 96. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But nevertheless, they weren’t all successful
  97. 97. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I think that pretty much any reason you give me, I could debunk in the same way
  98. 98. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & yet, at various times I have said things like:
  99. 99. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “study what works & try to deconstruct why” ~ me in 2013, from Throwing Sh*t Against the Wall & Analysing What Sticks,
  100. 100. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “by deconstructing the success of others you can improve your own chances” ~ me in 2014, from Appetite for Deconstruction, Lessons in Virality from Axl Rose
  101. 101. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “study successful content & try to figure out why it worked” ~ me in 2016, from How to Build a Time Machine
  102. 102. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’m like a broken record, huh? (I’m not the only person who’s said this, lots of people have)
  103. 103. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & despite saying this a bunch of times, I wasn’t always that great at actually figuring out why a piece was successful
  104. 104. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I spent a lot of time looking at successful pieces, but probably not nearly enough time looking at the coverage they generated
  105. 105. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Often I’d actually be looking at a successful piece & trying to slot it neatly into one of my ready-prepared sensemaking explanations
  106. 106. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com It was a low-effort & pretty comforting way of feeling like I understood this stuff
  107. 107. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & those explanations aren’t entirely wrong, but they aren’t actually that helpful
  108. 108. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I still this there’s merit in this advice:
  109. 109. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com “study the piece & try to deconstruct why it worked”
  110. 110. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But we need to somehow make sure we’re arriving at a better answer than “beer” or “map”
  111. 111. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We need to ask better questions...
  112. 112. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com So, rather than asking myself “Why was this piece successful?” I try to answer these questions instead:
  113. 113. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com What stories did journalists write when they covered this piece?
  114. 114. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com You could still answer this in a pretty shallow way
  115. 115. When journalists covered this piece they wrote stories about beer
  116. 116. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Don’t do that... Look at the stories journalists actually wrote (For this piece, there were a bunch of different stories - “outrage” at how insipid the winning beers were, analysis on the 2 major brewers, InBev & SABMiller who own most of these beers, nostalgic travel stories, & more)
  117. 117. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Did the coverage of this piece feed into something else which was going on in the newscycle? (e.g. another news story, a trend, etc)
  118. 118. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Were there waves of coverage that lead to the ultimate success of this piece? If one of those things hadn’t happened, would it still have been a success?
  119. 119. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com What emotions did this coverage provoke? (within readers, but also within yourself)
  120. 120. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Which verticals (or types of publication) covered this?
  121. 121. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Did this piece get coverage in multiple countries?
  122. 122. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com This is way more work though, do we really need to do all that?
  123. 123. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Yep, I think we do… Here’s why:
  124. 124. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Typically we try to replicate success in one of two ways: or “Remake” same idea & same topic “Remix” same idea, different topic
  125. 125. This is a remake - it’s a mash-up of publicly available data sources on the most congested roads
  126. 126. This what we were remaking - it was created by a vehicle tracking company http://www.satrakvehicletracking.co.uk/blog/uks-slowest-motorways-revealed-satrak/
  127. 127. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com We’ve used a different dataset, but we’re still answering the same question the previous piece did same idea, same topic = remake
  128. 128. This is a remix: it explores what these $1bn companies & their founders have in common
  129. 129. This is what we were remixing - it explores what the world’s billionaires have in common
  130. 130. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Both pieces explore the same thing: “what traits do this cohort share?” but one looks at Billionaires & the other looks at Unicorn companies & their founders same idea, different topic = remix
  131. 131. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I don’t think there’s anything wrong with doing either of these things I’ve done both, many times
  132. 132. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But both “remakes” & “remixes” are prone to failure “Remake” same idea & same topic “Remix” same idea, different topic
  133. 133. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Let’s take a closer look
  134. 134. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com remakes
  135. 135. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Remakes often feel like a safe bet, but that’s not always the case
  136. 136. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com This is best explained with examples, so: I’m going to take two remakes & try to determine if they’d still be successful if we remade them again today
  137. 137. Should we remake this remake?
  138. 138. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com The conditions that led to the success of this piece are alive & well today
  139. 139. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Journalists continue to write stories about these types of studies & they don’t seem to mind that the “winners” don’t change much
  140. 140. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com If you remade this piece with a new dataset you could reasonably expect to get similar levels of success even if the “winners” don’t change* (*assuming that someone else doesn’t beat you to it)
  141. 141. So remaking this remake is a reasonably safe bet :)
  142. 142. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But that’s not always the case...
  143. 143. Should we remake this remake?
  144. 144. For this remake, we gathered new data & found a new winner
  145. 145. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Studies about on-screen death counts are not something entertainment journalists perpetually cover
  146. 146. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com They don’t behave in the same way as motoring journalists
  147. 147. & early coverage came about because the new “winner” was surprising & controversial
  148. 148. Shortly after the piece launched, Director James Gunn shared a piece of early coverage, & then spent 2 hours arguing with people about it on twitter “No, Stars Wars does not count”
  149. 149. A huge chunk of the coverage the piece subsequently received was just journalists reporting on James Gunn’s tweets
  150. 150. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com What are the chances of you replicating that?
  151. 151. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com If you fail to find a new “winner” you’ll almost certainly struggle to get coverage; (I don’t think Gunn’s going to spend another 2 hours on twitter) & even with a new winner, you still might struggle
  152. 152. Remaking this piece is not quite such a safe bet
  153. 153. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com what about remixes?
  154. 154. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com With remixes the reasons for failure are slightly different
  155. 155. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Let’s look at a couple:
  156. 156. This is a remix
  157. 157. This was the original
  158. 158. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com As with most remixes, my justification for making the Candy Crush piece, was largely based on the success of the Instagram piece...
  159. 159. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I think it went something like this:
  160. 160. This helps people contextualise & understand just how big Instagram is
  161. 161. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & so I asserted:
  162. 162. This will be successful because it will help people contextualise & understand just how big Candy Crush is
  163. 163. I thought these two topics were broadly comparable & therefore these pieces would likely share similar levels of success
  164. 164. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But what I failed to acknowledge was how journalists were writing about Instagram & Candy Crush were not the same
  165. 165. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & actually, journalists weren’t writing about Candy Crush much at all
  166. 166. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’d love to tell you that I’ve never made that mistake again
  167. 167. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But I have...
  168. 168. Buoyed by the success of this remix...
  169. 169. We remixed it again (remix the remix), & made something for Crufts (the piece is no longer live)
  170. 170. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But again, I failed to acknowledge that the way journalists write about Crufts is not the same as the way they write about Unicorns & their founders
  171. 171. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’ve frequently been guilty of assuming that the ways in which journalists write about different topics are the same, when often they really aren’t
  172. 172. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Ok, let’s wrap this thing up...
  173. 173. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Why do we struggle to recreate the success of previous pieces?
  174. 174. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Because we often fail to understand why they really worked
  175. 175. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Trying to answer these questions might give you a clearer understanding: - Stories - What stories did journalists write when they covered this piece? - Trends & other breaking news - Did the piece feed into something else which was going on in the newscycle? - Waves - Were there waves of coverage? What caused those waves? - Emotions - What emotions did the coverage provoke? - Verticals - Which verticals or types of publication covered this? - Countries - Did the piece get coverage in multiple countries?
  176. 176. We see a successful piece We conclude it’s successful because it’s a map We see another successful piece We notice it’s a map too THERE’S A PATTERN! All future successful pieces we encounter which are maps add “evidence” to support this explanation It’s important that we try to do this, because those patterns we’re so fond of spotting often leave us exposed...
  177. 177. Patterns like “beer” & “map” don’t allow us to acknowledge this stuff: Remakes fail when we’re not able to recreate the conditions which lead to the success of the original piece Remixes fail when we don’t understand what journalists are actually writing about in the niche we’re working in “Remake” same idea & same topic “Remix” same idea, different topic
  178. 178. But changing our approach could reduce our exposure: Remakes fail when we’re not able to recreate the conditions which lead to the success of the original piece By gaining a clearer understanding of those conditions we’re better able to evaluate our chances of success “Remake” same idea & same topic
  179. 179. The conditions that led to the success of this piece are still in play
  180. 180. So remaking this is a reasonably safe bet
  181. 181. This was a weird outlier - journalists do not perpetually write stories about studies pertaining to on-screen death counts
  182. 182. Remaking this might not be such a safe bet...
  183. 183. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com What about remixes?
  184. 184. Changing our approach might reduce our exposure here too: Remixes fail when we don’t understand what journalists are actually writing about in the niche we’re working in By researching what journalists are writing about in that niche we’re better able to evaluate our chances of success “Remix” same idea, different topic
  185. 185. When we launched this piece, lots of journalists were writing about just how big Instagram was getting
  186. 186. When we launched this piece, Candy Crush had (arguably) already peaked - no one was writing much about it’s growth
  187. 187. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’d like to leave you with a couple of final thoughts
  188. 188. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com this stuff is really hard
  189. 189. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com The following stats are from Aira’s 2020 State of Link Building Report
  190. 190. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com 28% of us have created a campaign in the last year that secured no links Source: https://www.aira.net/state-of-link-building/link-building-process/
  191. 191. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com If you’ve not managed to create a campaign that achieved over 100 links in the past 12 months, then you’re not alone:
  192. 192. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com neither have the vast majority - 79% of the respondents surveyed have not seen this level of success either Source: https://www.aira.net/state-of-link-building/link-building-process/
  193. 193. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com The vast majority of campaigns created are not “successful”
  194. 194. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’ve launched far more “misses” than “hits” & everyone fails a lot more often than you probably realise More on this here: https://worderist.com/2019/09/09/skewing-reality/
  195. 195. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com Putting together this talk has been pretty eye-opening for me
  196. 196. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’ve gone back over a lot of old talks & blog posts
  197. 197. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com There are a bunch of things that I’ve said & written in the past which were well-meant...
  198. 198. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com but were either horribly incomplete, or easy to misinterpret, or both
  199. 199. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & so I’d encourage you to think critically about what I’ve shared here
  200. 200. Are all campaigns either “remakes” or “remixes”? “Remake” same idea & same topic “Remix” same idea, different topic Probably not, because this is not the only way we come up with ideas. I suspect however, that many of the ideas we consider to be original, are actually either remakes or remixes, we’re just not necessarily aware of the existence of the originals.
  201. 201. & are these the only reasons we fail? Remakes fail when we’re not able to recreate the conditions which lead to the success of the original piece Remixes fail when we don’t understand what journalists are actually writing about in the niche we’re working in “Remake” same idea & same topic “Remix” same idea, different topic
  202. 202. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com nope :(
  203. 203. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com But I’m hoping I’ve given you some new things to think about :)
  204. 204. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & I’ll say it again, I’d encourage you to think critically about what I’ve shared here
  205. 205. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com I’d also encourage you to continue to think critically about some of the explanations of successful pieces you might have absorbed
  206. 206. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com & remember that beer is rarely the answer :)
  207. 207. good luck out there x
  208. 208. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com thoughts, feelings, questions? AMA :) Hannah Smith Creative Content Consultant Worderist.com Wanna hire me? drop me an email - hannah@worderist.com If you enjoyed this talk, you might also enjoy my newsletter : https://worderist.com/newsletter/
  209. 209. @hannah_bo_banna Worderist.com A massive thank you to the amazing humans who helped me put this talk together: Areej AbuAli, James Barnes, Alex Cassidy, Will Critchlow, Mark Johnstone, & Gisele Navarro. Image Credits Every Country’s Most Popular Beer: https://vinepair.com/wine-blog/most-popular-beer-every-country-map/ Brewery Road Trip: https://flowingdata.com/2015/10/26/top-brewery-road-trip-routed-algorithmically/ Highways to Hell: https://www.gocompare.com/new-interactives-content/highways-to-hell/ Slowest Motorways Revealed: http://www.satrakvehicletracking.co.uk/blog/uks-slowest-motorways-revealed-satrak/ Directors’ Cut: https://www.gocompare.com/life-insurance/directors-cut/ The Deadliest Films: http://www.randalolson.com/2013/12/31/deadliest-films-of-all-time-by-on-screen-death-counts/ Photos on the Web: https://cewe-photoworld.com/photos-on-the-web/

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