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Twitter quotations 2020 from Helen Bevan

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Twitter quotations 2020 from Helen Bevan

  1. 1. 23 quotations that I posted with tweets during 2020 @HelenBevan [Quotations from other people] are sources of guidance in times of need, they can give us inspiration in times of struggle, they can motivate us in times of tribulations--success is not final and failure is not forever. Lolly Daskall @HelenBevan A year of Twitter quotations
  2. 2. About this slide deck Each page in this slide deck contains a quotation that I posted as a visual with a tweet during 2020. I used them to illustrate the point I was making in the tweet. I have attempted to group the quotations by similar themes in this deck. You may not agree with all of the quotations but I hope they might inspire, motivate and/or challenge you as they have me during this challenging year. @HelenBevan @HelenBevan A year of Twitter quotations
  3. 3. Diversity: a powerful lever for change in an ambiguous, complex world Diversity is how we can become collectively smarter. Diversity is the foundation for creativity. There are no best practices for creativity, only unique practices, of which we need many. We need to stop looking for the next best practice and create our own emergent practices through our diverse connections. Therefore, organisations have to become knowledge networks. An effective knowledge network cultivates the diversity and autonomy of each worker. Those in leadership positions should foster deeper connections, developed through ongoing and meaningful conversations. These leaders know they are just nodes in the knowledge network and not a special position in a hierarchy. They ensure variety and diversity, not control. Harold Jarche https://networkweaver.com/diversity-trumps-ability/
  4. 4. Why belonging at work counts more than inclusion or diversity Diversity is a fact (the numbers are what they are), inclusion is a choice (you decide whether to include someone or not), but belonging is a feeling that can be enforced by a culture that you can purposefully create. The best thought-out diversity and inclusion strategies will go so much further in cultures where people feel they belong because when we’re seen and valued for who we really are — our own unique and authentic selves — we thrive, and so do the people around us. Anita Sandshttps://medium.com/@AnitaSands/diversity-and-inclusion-arent-what-matter-belonging-is-what-counts-4a75bf6565b5
  5. 5. There is a critical relationship between diversity, inclusion, belonging and psychological safety Leaders who care about diversity must care about psychological safety, just as those who care about psychological safety must also care about diversity, inclusion, and belonging. Amy Edmondson www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/the-fearless-organization/202006/the-role- psychological-safety-in-diversity-and-inclusion
  6. 6. Why we should always make the effort to pronounce someone’s name correctly and if we don’t know, ask them Mutilating someone’s name is a tiny act of bigotry Jennifer Gonzalez https://www.cultofpedagogy.com/gift-of-pronunciation/ @HelenBevan Twitter quotations 2020
  7. 7. Being kind and compassionate has far reaching impact The positive ripple effect that comes from being kind doesn't just impact our health, but it can also impact our interactions with others and set off a positive chain reaction with far-reaching benefits across entire communities…... In a world where you can be pretty much anything, be kind. It's good for your health. Jaimee Bell @HelenBevan A year of Twitter quotations https://bigthink.com/mind-brain/kindness-benefits-james-doty
  8. 8. Emotional rescue: Songs for our times As countries all around the world enter the most restrictive peacetime measures they may have experienced, people everywhere will experience a range of moods and emotions that will impact on their lives. Such emotional swings and changes are not to be discounted lightly; they will shape how countries, communities and citizens respond to the requirements of the situation we collectively face. It is important that we understand them, see the collective pattern and ascertain where we are individually and collectively in order to determine appropriate responses. We foresee that after the initial burst of energy associated with the introduction of tough new measures, we may enter a period of despondency and disillusionment as the reality of the situation takes hold before we begin to emerge into a new world. We need to be conscious of how our moods change: this will help us as we navigate through uncharted territory together in an epic struggle that has profound implications for us all. We’ve characterised three changes of mood through song titles that can help us to appreciate what is happening to us and millions of others at this time: No regrets, Stuck in the Middle and I can see clearly now. Dr David Nabarro https://www.4sd.info/covid-19-narratives/narrative-seven/
  9. 9. Facilitation and facilitative leadership is a capability that every leader should invest in Facilitation, or facilitative leadership is the dynamic and effective ability to move a process along in the most inclusive, focused, energised and alive way possible. Facilitation [is] a way of being that offers safe space, creates a container for exploration, makes way for emergence, enables collaboration and co-creation, builds a culture of inclusion, and helps to align discrete actions with and towards a larger purpose. I believe it’s as necessary a leadership skill today as planning, organising, and controlling was fifty or seventy years ago. Sahana Chattopadhyay https://medium.com/age-of-emergence/organization-design-71ab1b106c7a
  10. 10. We need to move from “parent-child” to “adult-adult” relationships at work This shift from parenthood to partnership in work is relevant to us all. It won’t be easy – our parent and child ways of being are so ingrained in us, learned habits from school and work… When we have a truly adult-adult culture, it liberates each individual’s full intelligence and creativity, creating workplaces that are nourishing rather than depleting. Lisa Gill https://corporate-rebels.com/guest-blog-paradigm-shift/
  11. 11. In delivering change, actions matter more than words New language explains new ways of working. The ways of working give meaning to the words and are the most powerful symbol of the changes. If you want to explain your new language and develop a consistent meaning for your people, match the words with consistent and visible practice. Simon Terry https://simonterry.com/2020/02/06/change-gibberish/
  12. 12. Change starts with me: the fastest and easiest way to create movement in what’s going on around you is to focus on what going on inside you [Our research] indicated that over half the reason why big change either succeeds or fails is down to how skilled leaders are at being able to tune into and regulate their inner emotional and mental response to experience. Deborah Rowland https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/businessreview/2020/02/25/change-and-obliquity-how-to- achieve-complex-objectives-through-indirect-means/
  13. 13. How to get started with change The most important thing you can do to bring change about is simply to get started. If not now, when? If not you, who? Greg Satell https://www.digitaltonto.com/2020/the-5-myths-that-kill-transformation- and-change/
  14. 14. To take ownership of a new strategy, teams need more than information or inspiration — they need a specific, personalised license to act The real work of strategy execution lies in teams, not in the leaders. And that no organisation can afford a single day in which employees do not have a working hypothesis about where they contribute most. It is easy to default into cascade mode — passing on information, and declaring priorities, insights, and expectations — and miss the opportunity to build the commitment and ownership the organisation and the strategy require. Elizabeth Doty https://www.strategy-business.com/blog/How-to-help-your-employees-own-your-strategy
  15. 15. How to manage mavericks Geniuses aren’t always easy people to live with, but their contributions produce such a jump in quality that they deserve the collective hard work and support [that’s required]. Ben Lyttleton https://www.strategy-business.com/blog/How-to-manage- mavericks?gko=a829f&sf230448802=1
  16. 16. System leadership: a definition of connection Connection is the energy that is created between people when they feel seen, heard and valued - when they can give and receive without judgement. Brene Brown https://t.co/4Torf9S9Eb?amp=1 ‘
  17. 17. How to make organisational/system transformation happen You have to attract, not try to overpower. Change can’t be a corporate mandate. People have to want to join in. There has to be an element of fun and joy to it all. While managers often plan initiatives to be linear, hierarchical, and based on persuasion, initiatives actually succeed by growing through informal networks, which are non-linear. This allows them to start slowly, but then scale very quickly [by giving power to] advocates to share their excitement with others, who can then bring in others still. Greg Satell https://hbr.org/2020/03/you-dont-need-a-grand-strategy-to-achieve-organizational-change
  18. 18. Inclusive leadership is a critical competence in a time of crisis Now is a time for leaders to think about what type of leader they need to be for all of their workers, especially the most vulnerable and marginalised. As we move from rapid response to short- to long- term recovery, community, connection, and allyship — including deep awareness about how implicit bias shows up in decision making — will become even more important critical leadership competencies. Daisy Auger-Dominguez https://hbr.org/2020/04/how-to-be-an-inclusive-leader-through-a- crisis?utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_campaign=dailyalert_ac tivesubs&utm_content=signinnudge&referral=00563&deliveryName=DM76336
  19. 19. The mutual aid movement is helping to create a different future Many pathways toward a better world are being laid bare by the altruistic mutual aid efforts arising in cities around the globe. These locally designed and collaboratively built acts of solidarity—which view the vulnerable as participants in their survival rather than passive consumers of assistance—inform a model of community resilience and collective empowerment with implications far beyond their immediate impact. The coronavirus pandemic has shaken the globe, and it is likely that things will never return to the way they once were. While we fight to mitigate the damage the crisis has wrought, we should learn lessons from the mutual solidarity and community resilience that it has unveiled. It will ensure the world that comes after the crisis is a better one for all. Samer Araabi https://ssir.org/articles/entry/lessons_from_mutual_aid_during_the_coronavirus_crisis?utm_source=Enews&ut m_medium=Email&utm_campaign=SSIR_Now&utm_content=Title#
  20. 20. Emerging from the Covid-19 pandemic with a focus on living our mission and values Don’t shy away from how this crisis has changed your [organisational] culture, or if your workplace has long needed an overhaul. Find out how to positively impact employees during this crisis and do that thing immediately. Use this as an opportunity to realign your mission, vision, or values with employee happiness and morale. Jason Nazar https://www.fastcompany.com/90502230/8-critical-lessons-leaders-need-to-emerge-from-the-covid-19-crisis-and-one-that- will-surprise-you?partner=rss&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=rss+fastcompany&utm_content=rss
  21. 21. Challenges in taking the learning from the Covid 19 response to the next stage in the health and care system The gratifying psychology of feeling necessary, and even heroic, in addressing the day-to-day challenges…. implicitly devalues the work of creating a standard system that can be replicated. Frontline clinicians have been shown to prefer firefighting and workarounds over taking time out to implement process improvements. It takes creativity to design, and discipline to implement, management systems. This is the challenge that today’s health care systems are facing. Amy Edmondson https://hbr.org/2020/05/what-hospitals-overwhelmed-by-covid-19-can-learn-from- startups?utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_campaign=dailyalert_activesubs&utm_content=signinnudge&referral=00 563&deliveryName=DM81486
  22. 22. It’s time to rethink extroversion vs. introversion It’s often said that extroverts get their energy from people, while introverts are energised by solitude. The data show that’s a myth. In a pair of studies, people rated their energy hourly or weekly. Extroverts felt more energised when they were being talkative and outgoing - but introverts did, too. Then, in an experiment, people were randomly assigned to act like extroverts or introverts in a group discussion. Acting extroverted energised even the introverts. Being introverted has nothing to do with liking alone time. It turns out that the desire for solitude comes from a different trait altogether: independence. Adam M Grant https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/16/smarter-living/coronavirus-introverts-lonely.html
  23. 23. On the value of small meetings Breakouts are the superfood of innovation. In small groups, you have inclusion, you have risk taking, you have psychological safety and you have people willing to say stupid stuff that might be the tipping point of extraordinary things Keith Ferrazzi @Ferrazi https://twitter.com/Inc/status/1318924773884309505
  24. 24. Your virtual meetings need a Yoda Candour is difficult even for co-located teams, but it’s the number one gauge of team productivity. To keep people engaged during virtual meetings, appoint a “Yoda.” Like the wise Jedi master in Star Wars, the Yoda keeps team members in line and makes sure everyone stays active and on topic. The Yoda keeps honesty from boiling over into disrespect by being courageous and calling out any inappropriate behaviours. At critical points during the meeting, the leader should turn to the Yoda and ask, “So, what’s going on here that nobody’s talking about?” This allows the Yoda to express the candour of the group and encourage risk-taking. Keith Ferrazzi https://hbr.org/2015/03/how-to-run-a-great-virtual- meeting
  25. 25. Some wisdom about making the most of our time If you find you're breathing but not living, it's not time you need, but love. If you find you're not as productive as you want to be, it's not time you're lacking, but FOCUS. We all have the same amount of time in a given week. What matters is HOW we use it.‘ ‘ ‘ Wisdom from Shane Parrish @ShaneAParrish

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