Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Energy in Scotland - Consumer Perspectives

91 vues

Publié le

Hot on the heels of the launch of the Scottish Government’s Energy Consumer Action Plan, we reflect on what we have learned over the last few years about Scottish consumers’ experiences, attitudes and behaviours in respect of energy – including in relation to affordability, switching, home energy efficiency and support services for the vulnerable – and challenges the Government may face in delivering its vision for consumers.

Publié dans : Environnement
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Energy in Scotland - Consumer Perspectives

  1. 1. Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public © 2016 Ipsos. All rights reserved. Contains Ipsos' Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be disclosed or reproduced without the prior written consent of Ipsos. 1 Ipsos MORI March 2019 Energy in Scotland: © 2019 Ipsos. All rights reserved. Contains Ipsos' Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be disclosed or reproduced without the prior written consent of Ipsos. Consumer perspectives
  2. 2. 2Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public December 2017 saw the Scottish Government launch its first Energy Strategy. Among six priority areas set out in the strategy was consumer engagement and protection (along with energy efficiency; system security and flexibility; innovative local energy systems; renewable and low carbon solutions; and oil and gas industry strengths). Eighteen months on from the launch of the Strategy, we take a look at what we have learned over the last few years about Scottish consumers’ experiences, attitudes and behaviours in respect of energy – including in relation to affordability, switching, home energy efficiency and support services for the vulnerable – and challenges the Government faces in achieving its vision. Sara Davidson & Ciaran Mulholland Energy and Environment Research Ipsos MORI Scotland Introduction
  3. 3. Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public 3 The Cost of Energy
  4. 4. 4Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: Scottish Government 2018Base: 1,501 adults in Scotland . 50% of those earning £5,200-£15,599 per annum 65% of those earning less A quarter of Scots say they are struggling financially… 23% 38% 38% are coping are living comfortably are finding it difficult to manage
  5. 5. 5Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: The Scottish Government (2018), Scottish House Condition SurveyBase: 2,939 households in Scotland …and energy bills present particular challenges “[I’m managing] ok, but it’s getting harder as gas and electricity are going up all the time.” (55-64 years old, urban area) "It's not easy. Like I actually wouldn't be able to afford [fuel]. I think I ran out of money last week so had to phone my dad and say can I borrow £30 for food, because I had completely ran out of money.” (16-24 years old, urban area) 5%of households report they cannot afford to heat their homes and many more say it’s increasingly difficult.
  6. 6. 6Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: Scottish Government (2018) Scottish House Condition Survey A quarter of Scottish households remain in fuel poverty*… *A household is in fuel poverty if, in order to maintain a satisfactory heating regime, it would be required to spend more than 10% of its income on all household fuel use.
  7. 7. Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public 7 …most commonly older owner occupiers & people living in flats/tenements
  8. 8. 8Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: Ipsos MORI & Professor Donald Hirsch /Citizens Advice Scotland (2016) The Poverty Premium in ScotlandBase: 1,000 adults in Scotland 30%of people on a low income 1 in 5 Scots have experienced mental distress because of difficulties paying bills 19%had experienced stress or anxiety, rising to….. 57%of people in arrears
  9. 9. Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public 9 Switching
  10. 10. 10Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: Ipsos MORI & Professor Donald Hirsch /Citizens Advice Scotland (2016) The Poverty Premium in ScotlandBase: 1,000 adults in Scotland 35%had switched telecoms supplier Levels of switching in the energy market are low 24%of Scottish consumers had changed energy supplier in the last three years, while…
  11. 11. 11Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: Ipsos MORI & Professor Donald Hirsch /Citizens Advice Scotland (2016) The Poverty Premium in ScotlandBase: 1,000 adults in Scotland I'm not sure about when it tells you about kilowatt and all that. I'm not really sure what that all means, to be honest. (55+, rural area) I just don't really trust any of them. You switch to one and then they put their prices up and then the other one gets cheaper. (35-54 years old, urban area) All the big companies are all bound to more or less charge you the same… within a few pounds or whatever, so I don’t really think it would make much difference to me. (55-64 years old, rural area) Switching often seen as a hassle/confusing… …and not particularly worthwhile… 47% 20% 17% 7% 6% Happy with current supplier Switching is a hassle Have just never thought about it No difference between suppliers to make switching worthwhile Changed to a cheaper deal with current supplier Q: Why have you not switched supplier in the last three years?
  12. 12. 12Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: Ipsos MORI & Professor Donald Hirsch /Citizens Advice Scotland (2016) The Poverty Premium in ScotlandBase: 1,000 adults in Scotland People on a low income are: And there are signs of a ‘poverty premium’ in the market Less likely to have switched supplier (19% versus 24%) More likely to perceive switching as difficult (24% versus 17%) Less likely than high earners to pay for their energy via Direct Debit (49% versus 71% average) More likely to rely on a pre-payment meter (27% vs 17%) More likely to have experienced stress or anxiety as a result of difficulties paying bills (30% versus 19%)
  13. 13. Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public 13 Home energy efficiency
  14. 14. 14Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: Ipsos MORI/Scottish Government (2017) 2017 Scottish House Condition Survey Scotland’s homes are increasingly energy efficient…
  15. 15. 15Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: The Scottish Government (2018), Scottish House Condition SurveyBase: 2,529 households in Scotland …but work to do in promoting behavioural shift 18%report owning an energy monitoring device 54%of households say they monitor their energy use very or fairly closely but just…
  16. 16. 16Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public For many people energy efficiency just isn’t a priority… Source: Ipsos MORI & Involve/Citizens Advice Scotland (2017) Consumer Participation in Energy Policy Q: “Improving the energy efficiency of my home is not really a priority for me right now” 11% 38% Strongly agree Tend to agree Base: 54 qualitative research participants 9% 16% Strongly disagree Tend to disagree
  17. 17. 17Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public …so they are reluctant to spend on EE measures Q: “Having to spend my own money up front puts me off investing in home energy improvements, even if there are savings to be made” Source: Ipsos MORI & Involve/Citizens Advice Scotland (2017) Consumer Participation in Energy Policy Base: 54 qualitative research participants 33% 26% Strongly agree Tend to agree 9% 11% Strongly disagree Tend to disagree
  18. 18. 18Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public 64% 37% 35% 7% 7% 14% 10% 40% 37% More likely No difference Less likely A Pay-as-You-Save (PAYS) loan, which enables owners to install energy efficiency improvements at no upfront costs, with repayments made through the owner’s energy bill An interest-free loan with a cashback grant of 25% of the total costs of the works An equity loan or ‘green mortgage’, which enables homeowners to borrow against the value of their home Source: Ipsos MORI & Involve/Citizens Advice Scotland (2017) Consumer Participation in Energy Policy Support for potential financial incentives is limited Q: Would any of these financial incentive options make you more or less likely to take steps to improve the energy efficiency of your home? Bases: 54, 53 and 52 qualitative research participants respectively
  19. 19. 19Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Q: To what extent would each of these make you more or less likely to take steps to improve the energy efficiency of your own home? 13% 16% 61%A reduction of £500 in my Council Tax for 1 year for moving my home into the next £1000 off my Land and Buildings Transactions Tax for implementing specific energy improvements within 12 months of purchasing a property A reduction of £100 in my Council Tax per year for 10 years for moving my home by 2 EPC bands Short term tax relief could prove more popular Source: Ipsos MORI & Involve/Citizens Advice Scotland (2017) Consumer Participation in Energy Policy Bases: 54, 37 and 52 qualitative research participants respectively % saying more likely
  20. 20. Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public 20 Vulnerable consumers
  21. 21. 21Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Sources Ofgem (2018) Consumer Vulnerability Strategy: Reporting on Progress *Databases held by energy companies that consumers can sign up to in order to receive additional (non- financial) support – e.g. bills in accessible formats, advance warning of supply interruptions etc. Uptake of priority service registers (PSRs)* has more Number of electricity customers on a PSR 2014 2015 2016 2017 Scotland 232,646 273,627 345,599 485,582 GB 2,922,152 3,604,599 4,375,612 5,969,532 Number of gas customers on a PSR 2014 2015 2016 2017 Scotland 164,779 212,690 273,534 374,629 GB 2,293,109 2,985,188 3,663,464 4,758,524 than doubled since 2014
  22. 22. 22Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public Source: Ipsos MORI/Citizens Advice Scotland (2018) Research into Simpler Registration for Consumers in Vulnerable Situations …but low awareness of PSRs remains an issue First of all, I didn't know they had all these services. Second, I find out I am entitled to them, and third, [I’ve] got to register with them…If you don't know where they are, how are you going to register?.. It's absolutely shocking.” I never heard of this before and I'm kind of surprised that, having moved, three years ago, I wasn't made aware of this. I have heard [of priority service registers] but only in terms of some friends I have who are both quite physically disabled… I knew they were on a register with their electricity company.
  23. 23. 23Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public • The cost of energy is a challenge for many in Scotland – and a quarter of households remain in fuel poverty • One in five Scots have experienced mental distress as a result of difficulties paying bills • Yet levels of switching in the energy market are relatively low – particularly among low income groups – and only a minority of energy consumers closely monitor their energy use • Awareness of additional support for consumers is also low, despite increased uptake over recent years. Key challenges going forward
  24. 24. www.ipsos-mori.com/ Energy in Scotland: Consumer perspectives | April 2019 | Version 1 | Public 24 Sara Davidson Ciaran Mulholland 0131 226 8673 Sara.Davidson@ipsos.com 0131 226 8673 Ciaran.Mulholland@ipsos.com

×