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Soccer Fitness

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Soccer Fitness

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Soccer Fitness

  1. 1. SOCCER FITNESS A SCIENCE BASED APPROACH MikeYoung, PhD Athletic Lab - Cary, NC Vancouver Whitecaps -Vancouver, BC
  2. 2. Opening Thoughts Assume nothing Question everything “Common” sense? Science is fundamental
  3. 3. GAME REQUIREMENTS
  4. 4. FITNESSTRAINING
  5. 5. YEARLYPLANNING
  6. 6. REDUCING INJURY
  7. 7. ATHLETEMO NITO RING
  8. 8. FATIGUE MANAGEMENT
  9. 9. GAME REQUIREMENTS
  10. 10. Technical REQUIREMENTS OFTHE GAME
  11. 11. Technical Tactical REQUIREMENTS OFTHE GAME
  12. 12. Technical TacticalPsychological REQUIREMENTS OFTHE GAME
  13. 13. Technical TacticalPsychological Physical REQUIREMENTS OFTHE GAME
  14. 14. Technical TacticalPsychological Physical REQUIREMENTS OFTHE GAME
  15. 15. • Players cover average of 10-12km in a game (~6 miles) • Game is 80-90 minutes of continuous activity • 10-12km / 80-90 min = average pace of ~7km / hr (roughly 13’ mile pace)
  16. 16. • Players cover average of 10-12km in a game (~6 miles) • Game is 80-90 minutes of continuous activity • 10-12km / 80-90 min = average pace of ~7km / hr (roughly 13’ mile pace) “Logical” conclusion.... run, run, run (slow & steady)
  17. 17. BUT....
  18. 18. Flaw of Averages
  19. 19. JUST THE FACTS, MA’AM
  20. 20. FITNESS DEMANDS ANALYSIS OF MOTOR ACTIVITIES OF PROFESSIONAL SOCCER PLAYERSMARCIN ANDRZEJEWSKI,1,2 JAN CHMURA,3 BEATA PLUTA,1 AND ANDRZEJ KASPRZAK2 1 Faculty of Methodology and Recreation, University School of Physical Education, Poznan, Poland; 2 KKS Lech Poznan´ S.A, Football Club, Poznan´, Poznan´, Poland; and 3 Faculty of Players’ Motor Activity, University School of Physical Education, Wrocław, PolandABSTRACT Andrzejewski, M, Chmura, J, Pluta, B, and Kasprzak, A. Analysis of motor activities of professional soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 26(6): 1481–1488, 2012—The objective of this study was to determine the distance covered by professional soccer players during matches with the use of the computer- ized match analysis system Amisco ProÒ (version 1.0.2, Nice, France). Kinematic examination included the specification of the distance covered by 31 players participating in 4 matches in the Union of European Football Association during the 200 tactical, and mental preparation from the players (23). Recently, much attention has been paid to the selection of players possessing proper anthropometric and efficiency profiles, thus providing for the possibility of systematic workouts that allow players to achieve optimum perfor- mance. The preparation of a player is frequently focused on the improvement of technical or tactical skills at the expense of developing motor abilities (2,3,17,22,27). Lik team sports, soccer als
  21. 21. ANALYSIS OF MOTOR ACTIVITIES OF PROFESSIONAL SOCCER PLAYERSMARCIN ANDRZEJEWSKI,1,2 JAN CHMURA,3 BEATA PLUTA,1 AND ANDRZEJ KASPRZAK2 1 Faculty of Methodology and Recreation, University School of Physical Education, Poznan, Poland; 2 KKS Lech Poznan´ S.A, Football Club, Poznan´, Poznan´, Poland; and 3 Faculty of Players’ Motor Activity, University School of Physical Education, Wrocław, PolandABSTRACT Andrzejewski, M, Chmura, J, Pluta, B, and Kasprzak, A. Analysis of motor activities of professional soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 26(6): 1481–1488, 2012—The objective of this study was to determine the distance covered by professional soccer players during matches with the use of the computer- ized match analysis system Amisco ProÒ (version 1.0.2, Nice, France). Kinematic examination included the specification of the distance covered by 31 players participating in 4 matches in the Union of European Football Association during the 200 tactical, and mental preparation from the players (23). Recently, much attention has been paid to the selection of players possessing proper anthropometric and efficiency profiles, thus providing for the possibility of systematic workouts that allow players to achieve optimum perfor- mance. The preparation of a player is frequently focused on the improvement of technical or tactical skills at the expense of developing motor abilities (2,3,17,22,27). Lik team sports, soccer als •Aerobic capacity is EXTREMELY important •Average intensity approaches lactate threshold •Mid-Fielders run the most
  22. 22. FITNESS DEMANDS MATCH ACTIVITIES OF ELITE WOMEN SOCCER PLAYERS AT DIFFERENT PERFORMANCE LEVELS MAGNI MOHR,1 PETER KRUSTRUP,1 HELENA ANDERSSON,2 DONALD KIRKENDAL,3 AND JENS BANGSBO 1 1 Institute of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Department of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; 2 Department of Health Sciences, O¨rebro University, Sweden; 3 Center for Human Movement Science, Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina ABSTRACT We sought to study the physical demands and match per- formance of women soccer players. Nineteen top-class and 15 high-level players were individually videotaped in competitive matches, and time-motion analysis were performed. The players ity .1,300 times in a game correspond- total. The top- INTRODUCTION T he physical aspects of elite soccer players have been studied extensively in men (1,2,10,12,14– 18,22,25). Less information exists regarding the physical demands in women soccer players (5,6,7, 11,19,24). Body dimensions (8) and maximum aerobic power (6,8,11,23) of women players have been determined in several studies. In addition, some studies have examined the activity atch play (2,24). However, the main focus hich is believed to be
  23. 23. MATCH ACTIVITIES OF ELITE WOMEN SOCCER PLAYERS AT DIFFERENT PERFORMANCE LEVELS MAGNI MOHR,1 PETER KRUSTRUP,1 HELENA ANDERSSON,2 DONALD KIRKENDAL,3 AND JENS BANGSBO 1 1 Institute of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Department of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; 2 Department of Health Sciences, O¨rebro University, Sweden; 3 Center for Human Movement Science, Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina ABSTRACT We sought to study the physical demands and match per- formance of women soccer players. Nineteen top-class and 15 high-level players were individually videotaped in competitive matches, and time-motion analysis were performed. The players ity .1,300 times in a game correspond- total. The top- INTRODUCTION T he physical aspects of elite soccer players have been studied extensively in men (1,2,10,12,14– 18,22,25). Less information exists regarding the physical demands in women soccer players (5,6,7, 11,19,24). Body dimensions (8) and maximum aerobic power (6,8,11,23) of women players have been determined in several studies. In addition, some studies have examined the activity atch play (2,24). However, the main focus hich is believed to be •Top-class players perform more high intensity runs than lesser peers •Fatigue develops temporarily & towards the end of a game •Defenders have lower work rates than mid-fielders & attackers
  24. 24. FITNESS DEMANDS
  25. 25. •Straight sprints are the most dominant powerful action in decisive offensive situations in elite soccer •Most decisive powerful movements ending in goals are made without the ball
  26. 26. POSITIONAL DEMANDS ©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2007) 6, 63-70 http://www.jssm.org Physical demands of different positions in FA Premier League soccer Jonathan Bloomfield 1 , Remco Polman 2 and Peter O'Donoghue 3 1 Sports Institute of Northern Ireland, University of Ulster, Northern Ireland, UK, 2 Department of Sport, Health & Exercise Science, The University of Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, UK, 3 School of Sport, University of Wales Insti- tute Cardiff, Cardiff, UK Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical demands of English Football Association (FA) Premier League soccer of three different positional classifications (defender, midfielder and striker). Computerised time-motion video-analysis using the Bloomfield Movement Classification was undertaken on the purposeful movement (PM) performed by 55 players. Recogni- tion of PM had a good inter-tester reliability strength of agree- ment ( = 0.7277). Players spent 40.6 ± 10.0% of the match performing PM. Position had a significant influence o time spent sprinting, running, shu still (p < 0.0 age, stature, body mass and body mass index have been recently identified between elite players of different posi- tions suggesting that players of particular size and shape may be suitable for the demands of the various playing positions (Bloomfield et al., 2005). In this respect, posi- tional role appears to have an influence on total energy expenditure in a match, suggesting different physical, physiological and bioenergetic requ enced by play Research article
  27. 27. ©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2007) 6, 63-70 http://www.jssm.org Physical demands of different positions in FA Premier League soccer Jonathan Bloomfield 1 , Remco Polman 2 and Peter O'Donoghue 3 1 Sports Institute of Northern Ireland, University of Ulster, Northern Ireland, UK, 2 Department of Sport, Health & Exercise Science, The University of Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, UK, 3 School of Sport, University of Wales Insti- tute Cardiff, Cardiff, UK Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical demands of English Football Association (FA) Premier League soccer of three different positional classifications (defender, midfielder and striker). Computerised time-motion video-analysis using the Bloomfield Movement Classification was undertaken on the purposeful movement (PM) performed by 55 players. Recogni- tion of PM had a good inter-tester reliability strength of agree- ment ( = 0.7277). Players spent 40.6 ± 10.0% of the match performing PM. Position had a significant influence o time spent sprinting, running, shu still (p < 0.0 age, stature, body mass and body mass index have been recently identified between elite players of different posi- tions suggesting that players of particular size and shape may be suitable for the demands of the various playing positions (Bloomfield et al., 2005). In this respect, posi- tional role appears to have an influence on total energy expenditure in a match, suggesting different physical, physiological and bioenergetic requ enced by play Research article •Players spent 48.7± 9.2% of purposeful movement going directly forward •726 ± 203 turns in a game•Upwards of 40% of purposeful movement is spent walking or slowly jogging
  28. 28. Season 2011 PHYSICAL COMPARISON ATTACKER MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 10737 10715 11073 H.I. Dist Covered 1168 1090 1221 H.I. Dist Covered WP 705 672 751 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 385 349 388 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 70 68 94 No. H.I. Activities 154 149 164 Sprint Dist. 375 325 383 HSR Dist 793 764 838 No. of Sprints 56 50 57 Recovery Time 39 40 36 LEFT MIDFIELD MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 11469 11361 11753 H.I. Dist Covered 1212 1305 1440 H.I. Dist Covered WP 653 701 741 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 473 529 584 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 76 74 114 No. H.I. Activities 168 178 193 Sprint Dist. 353 387 442 HSR Dist 859 918 998 No. of Sprints 55 60 66 Recovery Time 35 33 30 CENTRE MIDFIELD MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 11631 11544 11850 H.I. Dist Covered 1038 1114 1225 H.I. Dist Covered WP 395 432 492 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 581 626 650 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 55 56 80 No. H.I. Activities 166 169 184 Sprint Dist. 255 287 320 HSR Dist 783 827 905 No. of Sprints 44 48 53 Recovery Time 36 35 32 RIGHT MIDFIELD MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 11455 11514 11734 H.I. Dist Covered 1291 1352 1478 H.I. Dist Covered WP 673 715 771 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 538 556 591 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 76 79 114 No. H.I. Activities 173 183 195 Sprint Dist. 402 408 466 HSR Dist 888 944 1011 No. of Sprints 58 62 69 Recovery Time 34 32 30 LEFT BACK MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 10996 10741 11100 H.I. Dist Covered 1130 1114 1180 H.I. Dist Covered WP 438 440 430 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 609 595 640 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 82 79 107 No. H.I. Activities 157 151 165 Sprint Dist. 331 341 356 HSR Dist 798 773 825 No. of Sprints 51 52 55 Recovery Time* 38 39 35 CENTRE BACK MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 10299 10017 10420 H.I. Dist Covered 784 715 823 H.I. Dist Covered WP 165 144 165 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 546 499 566 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 71 72 91 No. H.I. Activities 119 107 125 Sprint Dist. 212 195 221 HSR Dist 571 520 602 No. of Sprints 34 31 36 Recovery Time 50 56 48 RIGHT BACK MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 11104 10690 11170 H.I. Dist Covered 1122 1063 1283 H.I. Dist Covered WP 409 402 517 H.I. Dist Covered WOP 627 587 660 H.I. Dist Covered BOP 77 73 104 No. H.I. Activities 155 146 170 Sprint Dist. 339 315 407 HSR Dist 783 748 876 No. of Sprints 52 48 60 Recovery Time 37 40 35 GOALKEEPER MLS FAPL nPC Dist. Covered 5145 5168 5628 H.I. Dist Covered 69 69 84 No. H.I. Activities 14 14 17 Sprint Dist. 15 14 20 HSR Dist 54 55 64 Run Dist. 189 196 235 Jog Dist. 1125 1128 1343 Walk Dist. 3676 3684 3885 No. of Sprints 3 3 4
  29. 29. Conclusions... Different positions may require different levels & types of fitness Aerobic demand of the sport is high Anaerobic lactate component is less than what many believe
  30. 30. Conclusions... Linear sprinting is a HUGE determinant of goal scoring Speed without the ball may be a bigger determinant of scoring ability than speed with the ball
  31. 31. Conclusions... The game is primarily characterized as short bursts of high intensity straight ahead acceleration punctuated by intermittent rest periods of very low & moderate activity
  32. 32. Conclusions... Due to the intermittent high intensity efforts with insufficient recovery, the sport can best be classified as an alactic-aerobic sport
  33. 33. Application?
  34. 34. POINTS OF TRAINING EMPHASIS Considerable emphasis should be given to developing: Aerobic capacity Alactic Anaerobic abilities (especially linear speed) Limited (but beneficial) training should be done to enhance anaerobic lactate capacity
  35. 35. Aerobic Capacity
  36. 36. Aerobic Capacity Aerobic capacity fuels theability to perform repeatedhigh intensity efforts whenthe rest interval betweenefforts is insufficient forcomplete recovery
  37. 37. ANAEROBIC ALACTIC ABILITIES •Speed (especially linear) •Power •Strength
  38. 38. Quickness & Agility?
  39. 39. Quickness & Agility? A distinct but related motor pattern to speed, power & strength
  40. 40. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 2009, 4, 291-306 © 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc. High-Intensity Training in Football F. Marcello Iaia, Ermanno Rampinini, and Jens Bangsbo This article reviews the major physiological and performance effects of aerobic high- ed-endurance training in football, and provides insight on implemen- cal training. Analysis and physiological mea- tically demanding, and . BRIEF REVIEW ANAEROBIC LACTIC CAPACITY
  41. 41. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 2009, 4, 291-306 © 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc. High-Intensity Training in Football F. Marcello Iaia, Ermanno Rampinini, and Jens Bangsbo This article reviews the major physiological and performance effects of aerobic high- ed-endurance training in football, and provides insight on implemen- cal training. Analysis and physiological mea- tically demanding, and . BRIEF REVIEW •Players operate on the fringe of lactate threshold •Although not critical anaerobic lactic capacity may play an important support role •Great for training efficiency
  42. 42. FITNESSTRAINING
  43. 43. • Intensity must be sufficiently low that you are training aerobic pathways and not glycolytic • Durations must be sufficiently long that you are providing an adequate stimulus • For non-continuous efforts, rest intervals must be appropriate to achieve the desired outcome...too long or too short and you won’t provide the desired stimulus AEROBIC FITNESS
  44. 44. Aerobic Training Guidelines Continuous Method: Duration: 15-60 min Intensity: 70-85% of max HR Interval Method: Duration: 3-8 min / interval Reps: 3-5 Intensity: 85-95% of max HR Work:Rest Ratio: 1:0.5-3 Should be addressed in some manner 3-4x / week
  45. 45. Aerobic Training Guidelines The combination of games and standard duration technical / tactical practices may provide sufficient aerobic stimulus Additional work is appropriate for maintenance, remediation and during critical training windows of the year (off- season, long stretches w/o games, etc)
  46. 46. ANAEROBIC LACTIC CAPACITY
  47. 47. Anaerobic Glycolytic Training Guidelines Interval Method: Duration: 15 - 60 sec Intensity: 100-120% of V02max Work:Rest ratio: 1:1-2 Will primarily be addressed through small sided games and / or HIIT Methods Repetition Method: Duration: 40 sec - 12 min Intensity: 95-105% V02max Work:Rest ratio: 1:3-5
  48. 48. SPEED!
  49. 49. SPEED TRAINING GUIDELINES • Emphasize appropriate mechanics and maximal intensity • Work : rest ratios = 1 : 20 - 40 • Rep lengths of 10-40m (~ 1 - 5 sec) • Total volume should be constrained (160m - 300m)
  50. 50. SPEED TRAINING GUIDELINES Adding changes of direction, start-stops, turns, lateral movement, change of tempo, jumps, headers, etc are all appropriate but should not take away from the focal point of developing linear speed
  51. 51. To be fit for soccer you must be able to sprint fast. Repeatedly. With minimal rest. Repeat Sprint Ability
  52. 52. LIMITERS OF RSA •Fatigue from repeat efforts is inversely correlated to initial sprint performance •Limitations in energy supply, which include energy available from phosphocreatine hydrolysis, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative metabolism, and the intramuscular accumulation of metabolic by- products, such as hydrogen ions are key factors in performance decrement •Neural factors (magnitude and strategy of recruitment) are related to fatigue •Stiffness regulation, hypoglycemia, muscle damage and environmental conditions may also compromise repeat sprint ability (Bishop et al, 2011)
  53. 53. 1. Include traditional sprint training to improve an athlete’s capacity in a single sprint effort 2. Some high intensity interval training is beneficial to improve the athlete’s ability to recover between sprint efforts. (Bishop et al, 2011) TRAINING RSA
  54. 54. RSA Training Guidelines Intensity: 95-100% Reps: 10-30m Volume: <300m total Work:Rest Ratio: 1:5-10 Frequency: 1-2x / week RSA is addressed indirectly through other training methods but specific training is also recommended
  55. 55. AGILITY & QUICKNESS?
  56. 56. Small Sided Games! Stimulus will depend on the following variables: Rest interval between games Players involved Field size & dimensions Duration of games Restrictions Can be a sport-specific means of addressing aerobic, anaerobic, and / or anaerobic alactic abilities while simultaneously working on technical & technical skills
  57. 57. STRENGTH & POWER
  58. 58. “Do I really need to lift?”
  59. 59. “...there is sufficient evidence for strength training programs to continue to be an integral part of athletic preparation in team sports.” “Do I really need to lift?”
  60. 60. Benefits of Strength Training Enhances acceleration Reduces likelihood for injury Enhances power (jumping, change of direction, etc) Improves running economy
  61. 61. Maximal strength is most efficiently developed using external loads that challenge the neuromuscular system
  62. 62. • Muscles don’t act in isolation • Train movements not muscles • Address asymmetries and imbalances TRAINING HOLISTICALLY
  63. 63. • Multi-joint exercises through complete ranges of motion • For strength & power, lower rep ranges, higher loads, and moderate volumes are suggested • For hypertrophy, moderate reps and load with higher volume is suggested BASIC GUIDELINES
  64. 64. EXERCISE SELECTION: STRENGTH
  65. 65. Exercise Absolute Power (Watts)Absolute Power (Watts) 100kg Male 75kg Female Bench Press 300 Back Squat 1100 Deadlift 1100 Snatch 3000 1750 Snatch 2nd Pull 5500 2900 Clean 2950 1750 Clean 2nd Pull 5500 2650 Jerk 5400 2600 POWER DEVELOPMENT *Total pull: Lift-off until maximal vertical velocity **2nd pull: Transition until maximal vertical barbell velocity
  66. 66. Exercise Absolute Power (Watts)Absolute Power (Watts) 100kg Male 75kg Female Bench Press 300 Back Squat 1100 Deadlift 1100 Snatch 3000 1750 Snatch 2nd Pull 5500 2900 Clean 2950 1750 Clean 2nd Pull 5500 2650 Jerk 5400 2600 POWER DEVELOPMENT *Total pull: Lift-off until maximal vertical velocity **2nd pull: Transition until maximal vertical barbell velocity Even if use of Olympic lifts are inappropriate due to lack of equipment, low teachingexpertise, or athleteinexperience; the basicprincipals should still be incorporated (externally loaded, multi-joint, lower body explosive movement)
  67. 67. EXERCISE SELECTION: POWER
  68. 68. Heavy-Low Rep vs. Light-High Rep
  69. 69. • 1-3x/ week • Short but intense workouts • 20-40 minutes per session is sufficient • High load / low rep and / or explosive emphasis • Train the entire body • Use appropriate rest intervals Weight Training Guidelines
  70. 70. Bodyweight strength exercises are great for muscular endurance, work capacity, strength maintenance and when facility / equipment access is limited
  71. 71. Plyometrics Intensity is directly related to vertical displacement and points of contact (1 leg vs 2) Can and should occasionally be mixed in with running Quality rather than quantity is important Appropriate mechanics are critical
  72. 72. RUNNING ECONOMY: HOW STRENGTH & POWERTRAINING CAN AFFECT ENDURANCE
  73. 73. • Running economy is a result of enhanced neuromuscular characteristics like improved muscle power development and more efficient use of stored elastic energy • Resistance training using heavier loads or explosive movements improves muscle power and enhances the ability to store and use elastic energy MECHANISMS OF BENEFIT
  74. 74. •2.9% Improved Performance •4.6% Improved Economy
  75. 75. Evidence Supporting Resistance Training • K Stkren, J Helgerud, E Stka, and J Hoff. Maximal Strength Training Improves Running Economy in Distance Runners. MSSE 2008 • G Millet, B Jaouen, F Borrani, and R Candau. Effects of concurrent endurance and strength training on running economy and VO2 kinetics. MSSE 2002. • J Esteve-Lanao, M Rhea, S Fleck,   and A Lucia.  Running Specific Periodized Strength Training Attenuates Loss of Stride Length during intense Endurance Running.   JSCR 2008. • And MUCH MORE Evidence Refuting Resistance Training
  76. 76. CORE?
  77. 77. Myth: Mind-numbing reps of “abs” are the best way to strengthen the core
  78. 78. Myth: Mind-numbing reps of “abs” are the best way to strengthen the core Reality: The primary roleof the core iscontrolling flexion,extension and rotation
  79. 79. Myth: Mind-numbing reps of “abs” are the best way to strengthen the core Reality: Running &loaded exercises are atleast as beneficial Reality: The primary roleof the core iscontrolling flexion,extension and rotation
  80. 80. Myth: Mind-numbing reps of “abs” are the best way to strengthen the core Reality: Running &loaded exercises are atleast as beneficial Reality: Rotational & anterior (back) exercises must be incorporated Reality: The primary roleof the core iscontrolling flexion,extension and rotation
  81. 81. • Refers to functional capacity & positioning of core of body • Use static & dynamic exercises • Whole body movements requiring mid-line stabilization are beneficial Core Strength
  82. 82. Activity of trunk muscles during squats and pulls from the floor (dead lifts) is greater or equal to that produced with many common stability ball exercises. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, Volume 22, Issue 1, Pages 95-102, 2008. Trunk Muscle Activity During Stability Ball and Free Weight Exercises: Nuzzo, McCaulley, Cormie, Cavill, and McBride
  83. 83. Core Training
  84. 84. Core Training
  85. 85. Rotten Core Flexibility Training
  86. 86. ROLE OF FLEXIBILITY FOR SOCCER
  87. 87. •Stretching doesn’t reduce soreness •Overstretching can MAKE you sore
  88. 88. •Stretching makes you weaker (acute)
  89. 89. •Stretching makes you slower (acute) •More stretching = more slower
  90. 90. Too Flexible?
  91. 91. Stretching May Not Decrease Injury
  92. 92. DANGER OF HYPERMOBILITY Stewart&Burden,2004
  93. 93. DANGER OF HYPERMOBILITY Stewart&Burden,2004 Due to the demands ofthe sport, soccer playersneed more flexibility thanother athletes but as isusually the case, toomuch is never good
  94. 94. YEARLY PLANNING
  95. 95. PLAN AHEA
  96. 96. OFF-SEASONTRAINING: PUT HAY INTHE BARN
  97. 97. UNDERSTAND THIS
  98. 98. IN-SEASONTRAINING
  99. 99. Use common sense!
  100. 100. IN-SEASONTRAINING CONSIDERATIONS • Pre-game training for those not selected • Post-game training for bench players who see minimal or no time • Maintaining fitness while minimizing likelihood for soreness and fatigue
  101. 101. INJURY REDUCTION
  102. 102. Many Injuries are Preventable
  103. 103. INJURY DATA Here is what the latest research tells us regarding what types of soccer injuries occur: Most common boys’ injuries: o Ankle sprains (16.5% of all boys’ injuries) oThigh and upper leg strains (10.3%) o Concussions (9.3%) Most common girls’ injuries: o Ankle sprains (20.8% of all girls’ injuries) o Concussions (12.0%) o Knee sprains (10.6%) oThigh and upper leg strains (9.6%) Amount of time lost following injury: o Less than one week (55.0% of all injuries) o One to three weeks (28.6%) o More than three weeks (16.4%)
  104. 104. INJURY CORRELATES • Previous injury • Aerobic fitness prior to season • Asymmetries • Flexibility deficiencies
  105. 105. Performance PERFORMANCE & INJURY
  106. 106. PerformanceInjury Prevention PERFORMANCE & INJURY
  107. 107. WARMUP
  108. 108. ROLE OFTHE WARMUP • Ready the body and mind for practice / games: • Increase core body temperature • Improve performance • Reduction of injury • Psychologically, neurologically, physiologically prime • Training stimulus?
  109. 109. WARMUP CONSIDERATIONS • Timing • Physical &Technical • Practice vs. Games • In-game sideline warmups • General guidelines • Duration
  110. 110. WARMUP EXAMPLE
  111. 111. PRE-MATCH PRIMER
  112. 112. ATHLETE MONITORING
  113. 113. SURVEYS If you want to know....ask!
  114. 114. HEART RATE • Heart rate is a great indicator of training intensity • Current technology allows longitudinal tracking of every player on a team
  115. 115. GPS Tracking
  116. 116. Time-Motion Quantifying fitness values from practice & games
  117. 117. The Future is Here
  118. 118. HRV & OMEGA WAVE
  119. 119. Field tests are the most ‘real-world’ and pragmatic means of assessing readiness but may be logistically difficult to incorporate on a frequent and regular
  120. 120. FIELDTESTING • Aerobic: Bleep,Yo-Yo1 & 2, XC Runs, Cooper test, etc • Agility:Arrow head, Illinois, Pro-Agility, etc • Speed: 10m, 20m, 30m, 40m • Repeat Sprint Ability: 6 x 30m w/ 30 sec rest, etc • Strength: weight room and body weight • Power: power output, vertical jump, etc
  121. 121. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER
  122. 122. MANAGING FATIGUE & ENHANCING RECOVERY
  123. 123. Travel Stress
  124. 124. SLEEP & REST
  125. 125. NUTRITION • Daily • Training • Pre-training • Post-training • Games • Pre-games • Half-time Man City “Nutrition Locker”
  126. 126. Teach lifestyle habits Active recovery sessions? Manual therapy Cryo therapy Facilitating Recovery?
  127. 127. •Cold water immersion facilitates recovery •But not for the reasons you think...
  128. 128. Fitness is more than just running and lifting
  129. 129. Fitness is more than just running and lifting Manage fatigue & player readiness
  130. 130. Fitness is more than just running and lifting Manage fatigue & player readiness Plan, track, monitor, repeat
  131. 131. Fitness is more than just running and lifting Manage fatigue & player readiness Plan, track, monitor, repeat Smarter beats harder any day
  132. 132. THANKS @MIKEYOUNG FITFORFUTBOL.COM ELITETRACK.COM ATHLETICLAB.COM HPCSPORT.COM MIKE@ATHLETICLAB.COM

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