Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Hotel security

  • Soyez le premier à commenter

Hotel security

  1. 1. HOTEL SECURITY
  2. 2. Security  Security as a condition is the degree of resistance to, or protection from, harm.  It applies to any vulnerable and valuable asset, such as a person, dwelling, community, nation, or organization.  Establishing or maintaining a sufficient degree of security is the aim of the work, structures, and processes called "security."
  3. 3. Concept in Hotel  It is the moral and legal responsibility of a hotel to protect its guests and their property against threats posed by human beings with a conscious intent to harm them.  The security department of the hotel is responsible for the overall security of the building, in-house guests, visitors, day users, and employees of the hotel.
  4. 4. Security in Hotel
  5. 5. Security? Why?  Hotel guests want to feel safe and secure in their temporary home. Hotels have a duty to protect them. After all, the business depends upon them.  Apart from the possibility of death or injury and destruction, the adverse publicity from an incident, can result in ruined reputations, failing business and knock-on effects to tourism in the country or region.  The risk to hotels can also increase because of the identity of an individual guest or his or her family. VIP’s, celebrities or the infamous can present special difficulties.  Hotel staff may not even become aware of risks that some guests may bring with them. Consequently a hotel must be vigilant at all times.
  6. 6. What are the risks? Examples of Risk  • Terrorism  • Kidnapping  • Robbery by organized crime  • Opportunist robbery  • Burglary from rooms  • Baggage theft  • Fraud  • Invasion of guest privacy, by locals, press, interest groups  • Blackmail of staff  Many more…
  7. 7. Risks
  8. 8. Poor Hotel Security
  9. 9. Consequences  The use of technology, has greatly impacted how criminals can target hotels.  For instance, instead of visiting a hotel to collect many pieces of information, a criminal can now scan the Internet pulling up specifics about room numbers, location to other areas of interest, the leadership team and photos of critical areas in the property.  Using applications like Google Earth, a criminal can diagram the structure and their escape routes.
  10. 10. Consequences  Possibility of death  Injury  Destruction  The adverse publicity from an incident  Result in ruined reputations  Failing business and knock-on  Effects to tourism in the country or region.  The risk to hotels can also increase because of the identity of an individual guest or his or her family.  VIP’s, celebrities or the infamous can present special difficulties.  Easy terrorist attacks
  11. 11. Effective Hotel Security  Now since we know what could be the consequences, it is always better to prevent it than curing it.  Sometimes some things may be irreplaceable and it is always preferable to avoid such circumstances.  In order to avoid such circumstances, an effective hotel security program is formulated in the hotel organization.
  12. 12. Effective Hotel Security Programs  An effective hotel security programs enables the hotel to avoid preventable incidents and react to a quick, appropriate manner.  Three basic elements should be included in the program. 1. People 2. Procedure 3. Equipments
  13. 13. Effective Hotel Security Programs People  No matter which department or post everyone can contribute in making the hotel a safe place for all.  This is not only the concern of the security department. Procedure  Every property needs to have procedures for the staff to follow. The staffs should be well informed about the emergency procedures as well as any unusual events. Equipments  Simple safety equipments to state-of-the-art security surveillance system all help make today's hotels a safer and better place to be.
  14. 14. Group Work How can an effective security system work? What are the equipments that could be used for security? Based on the three aspects we have discussed just earlier.
  15. 15. Organizational Structure  The organization of the security department includes the chain of command or hierarchy from executive down to the front line.  The purpose of this section is to make clear who reports to whom and who has which responsibilities.  This gives a clear understanding of the duties and responsibilities along with all the answers regarding what are the limitations within the position and the line of authority, responsibilities and accountability.  The organizational structure depends upon the following criteria: 1. Division of work 2. Span of Control
  16. 16. Criteria Division of Labor:  The division of labor refers to narrow specialization of tasks within a process so that each employee can become a specialist in doing one thing.  The degree of division of labor depends on the degree to which performance of particular tasks is measureable, the degree to which wages affect task performance, and the implementation of technology.
  17. 17. Span of Control  Span of Control in an organization is defined as the number of employees reporting directly to one supervisor.  Traditionally, the span of control has been defined as four to seven subordinates under one manager.  The average size of the span of control, together with the total number of employees, determine the number of levels in an organization structure.
  18. 18. Span of Control  In a large organization there is one head and a sub head. It is ideal to have a manager at the senior middle level so that one manager can take care of personnel/ operational side and the director can take the administrative or Investigative side. The director is still the highest authority but it saves a position.  the above mentioned positions can be skipped entirely if the organization is small to medium. in such case supervisors or shift managers can be allocated depending upon the number of frontline staffs.  The ideal proportion of supervisor to officer is 1:5, if there are 10 officers in a shift or team , there should be 2 supervisors.
  19. 19. Span of Control  V.A Graicunas developed the term Span of Control in 1933 when he researched the effectiveness of varying management ratios. he determined that there were several factors, such as the physical location of the employees( whether they worked together or separately), personalities, types of work performed, and the capabilities of the employees.  The ratio was found to be acceptable at 4 employees to 1 supervisor all the way to 22:1 depending on those factors. Police departments operate at about 4:1 and the fire departments operate at about 3:1.  Later after the introduction of the new technology ,"Computer and other automation system took away some of the duties of supervisors and managers.
  20. 20. Organizational Hierarchy of Security Department General Manager Director of Security Security Manager Security Supervisors Security Officer Security Guards Doorman
  21. 21. Group Work  Draw an organizational chart for a large hotel keeping in mind all the vulnerable areas, the no. of guards according to the 24 hour shift patterns in different departments of the hotel, public areas, entrances on the basis of the physical location of the employees( whether they worked together or separately), personalities, types of work performed, and the capabilities of the employees.  Please explain why you have chose the no. guards or supervisors in that particular area.  Assume that there is also a casino and 3 outlets including a bar, recreational area( gym, spa, swimming pool), 150 rooms & staff parking area.
  22. 22. Types of Security Providers Depending upon the various factors such as the company profile, structure, capacity, location, safety requirements as well as feasibility and economy of the hotel, a hotel chooses one of the following types of security service providers: 1. Proprietary/ In- House Security 2. Contract Security  Proprietary security and contract security companies are responsible for protecting companies and businesses and ensuring the safety of employees and consumers.  A proprietary security company is controlled entirely by a particular company(hotel itself in this case) and is responsible for the hiring, firing and management of personnel.  A contract security company is operated by a professional security company and contracts its services to different companies.
  23. 23. Cost  Proprietary security is more expensive because your company is in charge of paying for benefits and higher wages for experienced personnel.  Because the status of proprietary security is considered higher, it usually attracts a higher quality of guard.  The wages tend to be lower with a contract security company because uniforms, sick leave and training benefits are all covered by the service.
  24. 24. Control  Proprietary security employees often feel more loyal to a particular company, because they feel a camaraderie with fellow employees and have an opportunity for growth and promotions.  There may be periods of time when a company may have to add or lay off workers, which can create a security problem within a company.  By using a contract security service, companies have the opportunity to deal with staffing problems easily and quickly.
  25. 25. Consistency  If your company requires daily security organization that needs to be micromanaged, having day-to-day proprietary security may be the way to go.  An important consideration when deciding which type of company to use is that regardless of which type of security company you select, employee turnover is a possibility.  Depending on the site, this could be problem that affects the safety of the individuals in the area.
  26. 26. Effectiveness  Proprietary security personnel are trained to the specific needs of the company, which helps them become more familiar with the layout of a building and recognize individuals coming in and out of offices.  Because of a high turnover rate, contract security guards aren't given the opportunity to become as friendly with employees.  This can affect their loyalty and commitment and adversely, to your detriment, affect their performance.
  27. 27. Liability  When a company decides to go with proprietary security, it is responsible for taking the proper measures regarding background checks and ensuring that an applicant has the proper training and skills to handle a job of this magnitude.  When working with a contract security company, you don't have to worry about training, recruitment or background checks; it is all handled by that firm.
  28. 28. Turnover  Blake & Associates Inc.(American Company) notes that turnover in contract security is high -- between 130 and more than 400 percent annually.  In-house security has the advantage of less turnover, as there is the perception of the job being a more permanent position.  A business wouldn't have to regularly retrain new contract staff about the company and building. In addition to having a stable work environment, in-house employees view their employer as offering a higher-quality job and being more loyal to staff, according to Blake & Associates Inc.  Staffing-There might be periods where you would have to lay off or add more staff. The contract company can deal with this easily and quickly, In house does not tend to have this flexibility.
  29. 29. Relationships  Company employees may feel more comfortable with in-house security, knowing that all parties are employed by the same group.  Having staff in a company can create an "us versus them" environment.  Employees may not report incidents or may hesitate to report because the contracted security is not "one of them" and may not understand the business or the people well enough to deal with the situation appropriately.  Whereas( Impartiality)-Guards aren't directly tied to your company so they can perform duties, & enforce regulations more effectively. They aren't going to get friendly enough with your business to get too comfortable and slack off
  30. 30. Group Work  In your view which is a better option for a non chain 5 star hotel, non- star hotel and an internationally recognized chain hotel.  Why?  Presentation on the next day.
  31. 31. Job Description Why do we need to understand the job responsibilities of different post.?
  32. 32. Job Description of Security Manager  Responsible for: Security Department Main Scope and General Purpose of Job: To direct and co-ordinate the overall activities of the Security Department. To guarantee the safety of all the guests, employees and hotel property.  Give direction and control all activities relating to the Security department, ensure the hotel meets its financial and guest satisfaction objectives. Responsible to create and coordinate trainings or anything related to employee development programs.
  33. 33. Job Description of Security Manager  Direct Responsibilities:  Performs duties common to all supervisors and other duties as may be assigned.  Establishes standard policies and procedures for recruitment. Be aware of the Fire and Emergency procedures, and your Departments responsibility in an emergency.  Be aware of the Security policies and procedures of the Hotel, and ensure that at all times in all areas of the Hotel that they are being strictly adhered to.  Be responsible for formulating the departmental plan and supervise it to be followed up.  Briefs Supervisors on function, VIP arrivals and other events, which will necessitate additional or special preparations.  Cables relationship with all guest of the hotel.  Conduct regular operational meetings to review, monitor, adjust and upgrade the performance of the Department as a whole, explaining new directions and policies and procedures at the same time.  Conducts frequent front and back of house checks ensuring the procedures, standards of employee grooming and manning levels are in order and takes appropriate action where necessary.  Conforms to and enface policies & procedures and rules & regulations as laid down by the brand(hotel chain) and the hotel in order to achieve the highest levels of uniformity and guest service.
  34. 34. Job Description of Security Manager  Delegates to and supervise all staff within the department and assist them in preparing work schedules.  Directs and controls all subordinate to ensure that all day to day operational matters are handled on time.  Establish control procedures in all operation aspects in accordance with hotel’s policy.  Implement and enforces safety regulations and house rules.  Investigate cases happened in the hotel. Should criminal cases are occurred in the hotel, Assist Police to do investigation work.  Maintain a Hotel logbook on incidents, complaints etc. and refer them, if required to the appropriate department for follow up action.  Performs special duties as required or designated by the General Manager.  Prepare job responsibilities of the security department. Adjust and update it according to the working situation.  Prepare the plan (especially during the densely populated or vehicle period) for external traffic, so as to keep the hotel area in good order.
  35. 35. Job Description of Security Manager  Prepare various monthly reports as required by the General Manager.  Responsible for implementing the policies and procedures in operation of the Security.  Responsible for the entire operations, staffing and equipment of the Security Department.  Through close supervision recommend improvements and changes to the operation of the Security Department especially creating service standard of the hotel.  To handle and resolve all guest queries and complaints in an efficient manner and to establish an amicable relationship with all clients, customers and guests of the Hotel.  Trains personnel according to established procedures and security training conducts training meetings to discuss problems and future plans, gives information and assignment.
  36. 36. Training  The security manager is responsible for training the whole department about: 1. All hotel regulations and factors affecting the operations of the hotel. 2. Unarmed defense tactics 3. Fire prevention and safety techniques 4. Basic fire fighting 5. First Aid 6. Preservation of crime scene and evidence 7. Action, duties and power where crime is detected 8. Action in crisis situation 9. Report writing
  37. 37. Security Guard Main Scope and General Purpose of Job:  The primary responsibility of a hotel security guard is to protect the hotel and the guests, employees and property within it.  Hotel security guards spend the majority of their time patrolling the grounds and premises of the hotel, or monitoring the hotel via security cameras. They report to either the head of security or the hotel manager.
  38. 38. Main Duties of Security Guard  To make regular rounds of all hotel corridors and areas.  To observe any suspicious or abnormal activities on the part of staff or guests.  To be alert to undesirable persons such as pimps, prostitutes, drunks, etc. and to evict them from the premises.  To assist the Duty Manager in inspecting the rooms of doubtful clients and assisting with suspected “skippers”.  To investigate any offence reported whilst on patrol and to ensure full details are made available to the police when necessary.  To ensure that staff particularly maids, conform to rules when cleaning guests’ rooms.
  39. 39. Main Duties of Security Guard  To look out for keys left in doors and to ensure their safekeeping.  To seize and deal with property found on patrol.  To maintain a close watch for any fire or safety hazards.  To provide escort where required for cashiers, etc.  To assist guests in decoding in-room safes.  To monitor security equipment e.g. CCTV, smoke detector.  To sign out pass/master key to employees.  Handle lost and found items(usually only valuables).
  40. 40. Why read this?  Think?  Come up with answers……
  41. 41. Ans  Enhance better team coordination as well as higher efficiency in task performance.  Proper division and allocation of staffs.  To calculate manpower or labor.  It properly defines the organization structure ensuring and facilitating effective communication, authority, limitations and responsibilities eradicating any confusions.  Better prepare the personnel for emergency or contingency situations where staffs need to take quick decisions.  To ensure specialization and no over or double work is done.  To know the limitation within the person and assign duties accordingly which he/she would be able to complete which eliminates the problem of inadequacy or incompetence.  It sets the standard for any establishment:  When things go wrong we know whom to catch.  When things surpass expectation, we know whom to appraise.  This act as the most powerful tool while dealing with problem regarding labor unions, managements decisions, financial planning, expansions, etc.  Overall guides all the employees towards attainment of the same objective-the company’s goal.
  42. 42. Security Equipments  What do you understand by Security Equipments?  Security Equipment are Firearms, ammunition, batons, chemical agents, security restraints and similar devices.  Can they work on their own?  They are aid to the security personnel and help them become more effective and efficient.  But how?
  43. 43. While Choosing Security Equipments  Property management department should understand the uses and limitations of any given type of security equipment before authorizing its installation.  So before purchasing any security hardware or equipment, the hotel must evaluate the following: 1. Will the equipment to be purchased solve a particular security problem? 2. Is the equipment the most cost effective –in other words are there less expensive (in terms of both capital and operating cost) alternatives? This will include rental of equipment rather then purchase. 3. Will the equipment have counter-productive effects on the operations(not immediately noticeable)? 4. Who will be responsible for this equipment and whether he is capable of maintaining and using the equipment. Is the training required and if so at what?
  44. 44. Why all of that?  Thorough cost benefits analysis must be carried out before making any purchase.  Hotel should not fall into the misconception that what works well in one hotel must work in others as well.  Every hotel will have its own set of threats, safety requirements.  So the hotel needs to be aware of all the requirements and the equipments required.
  45. 45. Categories of Security Equipments  They can be broadly divided into 5 categories: 1. Equipment for Physical Security and perimeter control. 2. Equipment for Surveillance 3. Communication System 4. Alarm System 5. Equipments for Guest Room Security
  46. 46. Physical Security and Perimeter Control  Physical security involves the protection of the hotel buildings, its ground and the assets within the building.  Perimeter control is concerned with restricting access to a property.  What are the equipments used in physical security and perimeter control?
  47. 47. Physical Security and Perimeter Control  Access control systems allow authorized personnel and material to move through normal access routes while detecting and delaying movement of unauthorized personnel and material.  Access control adds little, if any, enhancement to a structure’s physical barriers. The use of electrically operated locks and strikes with access control systems may actually reduce penetration delay times for doors.  Thus, access control systems must be integrated with other components of the overall physical security system to be effective. This will ensure that personnel seeking entry to the protected area are queued at the control point(s).  There are many different types of access control systems and they vary extensively in their complexity and capabilities.
  48. 48. Equipments for Physical Security and Perimeter Control  Computer security equipment  Locks  Safes  Safety deposit centers  Security doors  Security fencing  X-ray machines, free standing metal detectors, halnd held metal detector  Shutters and grilles  Explosive detectors  Steel office storage and furniture  Vacant property protection: concrete, temporary fencing, barb wire
  49. 49. Physical Security and Perimeter Control  There are certain areas or aspects that are needed to be considered before buying the equipments for physical security and perimeter control.  Layout and design  Lighting  Parking Area  Glass Protection  Landscaping  Why?
  50. 50. Layout and Design  Every hotel should incorporate necessary security and safety equipments during the designing of the building, pubic areas, hotel rooms, inter-departmental offices, recreation centers, parking and all other access points within the hotel premise.  Criminals operate best when undetected, this usually means under the cover of darkness or concealed behind obstacles.  Designs in hotel should be given great priority so that security measures are appointed at the most strategic locations which provides security as well as economy of movement, operation and, surveillance.  The security department should be aware of the layout and design of all the hotel and its related premise and assess all the areas for the level of risk and plan accordingly all the necessary risk limiting, preventing as well as tackling equipments or
  51. 51. Objective of Physical Security and Perimeter Control:  deter potential intruders (e.g. warning signs and perimeter markings);  distinguish authorized from unauthorized people (e.g. using keycards/access badges)  delay, frustrate and ideally prevent intrusion attempts (e.g. strong walls, door locks and safes);  detect intrusions and monitor/record intruders (e.g. intruder alarms and CCTV systems); and  trigger appropriate incident responses (e.g. by security guards and police)
  52. 52. Layout and Design Consideration Depending on  the type of establishments,  its client base,  business volume(rooms, seasons)  location,  theme,  no. of employees,  operational requirements( operating hours & services provided),  Compliance with the SOP of security procedures  risk levels or operational hazard and  Operating expenses, the hotel should choose effective and efficient security access limiting equipments but guest privacy and comfort should not be compromised which is the main objective of the hotel.
  53. 53. Layout and Design Consideration  It is up to security designers, architects and analysts to balance security controls against risks, taking into account the costs of specifying, developing, testing, implementing, using, managing, monitoring and maintaining the controls, along with broader issues such as aesthetics, human rights, health and safety, and societal norms or conventions.  Physical access security measures that are appropriate for a high security prison or a military site may be inappropriate in an office, a home or a vehicle, although the principles are similar.
  54. 54. Lighting  The elements of private security are to detect, deter, delay and respond to unwanted activity in a protected facility, lighting provides deterrence to criminal activity.  In the field of physical security, security lighting is often used as a preventive and corrective measure against intrusions or other criminal activity on a physical piece of property. Security lighting may be provided to aid in the detection of intruders, to deter intruders, or in some cases simply to increase the feeling of safety. Lighting is integral to crime prevention through environmental design  In most hotels, the interior lighting plan is generally more than adequate for most safety considerations however; the areas around the property, especially
  55. 55. Case Study  Security lighting can be counter-productive.  Work as group and come up with the reason to why this happened.  Turning off lights halved the number of thefts and burglary in Övertorneå Sweden.  A test in West Sussex UK showed that adding all-night lighting in some areas made people there feel safer, although crime rates increased 55% in those areas compared to control areas and to the county as a whole.
  56. 56. Lighting Consideration  Bright, unshielded floodlights often prevent people from noticing criminal activity, and help criminals see what they are doing.  While adequate lighting around a physical structure is deployed to reduce the risk of an intrusion, it is critical that the lighting be designed carefully as poorly arranged lighting can create glare which actually obstructs vision.  Studies have shown that many criminals are aware of this effect and actively exploit it. The optimal design will also depend on whether the area will be watched directly by humans or by closed-circuit television, and on the location of the observers or cameras.  Security lighting may be subject to vandalism, possibly to reduce its effectiveness for a subsequent intrusion attempt. Thus security lights should either be mounted very high, or else protected by wire mesh or tough polycarbonate shields. Other lamps may be completely recessed from view and access, with the light directed out through a light pipe or reflected from a polished aluminum or stainless steel mirror. For similar reasons high security installations may provide a stand-by power supply for their security lighting.
  57. 57. Some typical considerations include:  Reduce and prevent glare and situations mentioned above  Shielded or full cut-off (FCO) lamp housings which conceal the bulb could be used, which should direct light onto the ground or target and away from observers.  These lights should send no light above 80 degrees from the lowest point.(Nadir)  Lighting should be bright enough, and not "as bright as possible". In many cases a good rule of thumb is 0.5 watts per square metre (0.05 watts per square foot).  This might need to be increased in very confused environments, but conversely can be reduced in very open environments. Multiple lamps of moderate power instead of a few powerful lamps will reduce glare, provide more even illumination with reduced pools of shadow, and provide some redundancy if one lamp's bulb blows out or develops a bad counter balance.
  58. 58. Glare
  59. 59. Some typical considerations include:  Prevent malicious tampering or interference. This means that besides the lamp itself, the entire circuit from the source (Electric company or generator), through the wires, to the lamp and back should be protected.  Luminaries should be accessible so that the maintainer can replace blown bulbs as quickly as possible and clean the luminaries periodically. However they should be protected or somehow made inaccessible to tampering.  Ensure the electric meter box is locked or inaccessible, or else power the lights from a different line.  Control and power lines, where outside or vulnerable, should be either buried well underground (in conduits preferably) or at a height of at least 8 metres (about 24 feet).  Ideally multiple circuits should be used to prevent an accidental or malicious short or cut causing all illumination to fail.
  60. 60. Parking  If you look at the statistics, roughly 80% of the criminal acts at shopping centers, strip malls and business offices occur in the parking lot.  Lawyers make a good living off liability cases based on a lack of sufficient security measures or not taking "reasonable care" in the protection of employees and customers against criminal threats.  The lawsuits often revolve around lack of sufficient lighting, surveillance and response. Once crime takes a foothold in an area it is difficult to break the trend, but there are some things you can do that can improve security, deter crime, reduce potential liability and make your customers feel safer.  It's interesting to note that where parking lot security has been implemented, customer use has actually increased because they feel safer. Increased customer use means increased profit which can be used to justify the increased cost related to any security improvements.
  61. 61. Types of Parking Parking areas can be generally categorized as  street parking,  surface parking lots,  freestanding structure,  and structures that are physically connected to the facilities.  Street parking are the parking that are on the side of the streets. Surface parking are the open areas that are allocated for parking. Structures built for the purpose of parking are the freestanding structure and parking facilities that are attached to compliment or ease people coming to a particular place like mall. Theatres,etc.
  62. 62. Types of Parking
  63. 63. Parking Security Equipments or Aids  Lights- Various type and use  CCTV  Guards  Mechanical or motorized Tire Spikes  Traffic Barrier post  Mirror  Under Chassis Vehicle / Car Inspection Mirror
  64. 64. Consideration for parking Areas  The following consideration should be taken before installing security equipments at the parking lots: 1. The type of parking 2. Capacity 3. Design 4. Operating hours 5. Use (public, private, for employees only, only for guest) 6. Terrain/ Landscape 7. Atmospheric conditions 8. Availability of natural lighting and natural ventilations
  65. 65. Glass  Glass is an amorphous (non-crystalline) solid material. Glasses are typically brittle(fragile) and optically transparent  Selecting the right glass is important to the hotel as it not only add to the charm of the hotel but also provides a medium of safety and if proper considerations aren’t taken, the same could be a tool for hazards and accidents.  There are glass protecting products but it is wiser to select the proper glass then laying a protective layer over it, unless it is mandatory.
  66. 66. Glass protecting Products/ Equipments  Bar or Grill  Aluminum or metal Protection Borders  Window Protection Films  Apart from this stronger glass are advised to be used.
  67. 67. Types of Glasses  Normal (Annealed) Glass  Normal glass is synonymous with flat glass irrespective of the process of manufacture.  Float glass has a perfectly flat, brilliant surface, whereas sheet glass has slight distortions.  Both are referred as normal (annealed) glass and can be processed to obtain many different varieties of glass for use in buildings.   Applications  Normal glass is used in residences, shopping malls, hotels, restaurants, etc. for windows, shelves, doors and partitions, Solar Applications, Display cases, Shop fronts, Solariums, Greenhouse, Atriums & Railings etc.
  68. 68. Types of Normal (Annealed) Glass  Clear Glass  It is normal annealed glass, though clear & transparent, it does posses some color tint usually greenish. It is due to presence of some impurities such as iron.  Clear glass has very high-energy transmission when exposed to sunlight.  It provides a clear view of the objects across it.  Applications: Used in doors, windows, solar applications, shelves etc.  It is also used for further processing to other glass types.
  69. 69. Tinted glass  It is normal glass that is coloured by the addition of metal oxides into molten glass.  Tinted glass possesses filtering properties that help reduce eyestrain due to dazzle.  Its absorption properties help diminish energy transmissions when exposed to sunlight.  Tints like green allows more visible light and cut out infrared radiation.  Variations in the thickness of the glass would yield different performance in terms of light and solar radiation transmission.  Although darker shades reduce the amount of heat being transmitted to the interiors, they also reduce the amount of transmitted daylight.  Applications:  Used in doors, windows and partitions etc
  70. 70. Tinted Glass
  71. 71. Patterned, figured or rolled glass  It is a decorative and translucent glass with figures or patterns on one face.  In addition to diffusing light and obstructing visibility from the outside, the figures soften the interior lighting.  This type of glass is usually more fragile and less convenient to clean.  Applications:  Interiors of the buildings, opaque glazing like bathrooms etc
  72. 72. Patterned, figured or rolled glass
  73. 73. Wired glass  It has wire mesh incorporated during its production. Wired glass is recommended for its fire protection property.  In case of fire, the glass cracks but broken pieces tend to remain in position restricting the spread of flame and smoke for some time.  Applications:  Used where nominal fire protection is required in windows doors & partitions etc.
  74. 74. Wired Glass
  75. 75. Extra clear glass  Extra clear glass is a high value glass, free from impurities such as iron.  It has high light transmission of more than 92 percent and is free from interference with the true colour & sparkling of objects across it.  Applications:  It is used for a sparkling display of expensive materials like jewellery, watches, crystal ware, fine fabrics, art wares, solar applications etc
  76. 76. Ceramic printed glass  Also known as silk-screened glass for its appearance like a silk screen.  Certain areas of application make it important to mask a part or whole of glass for privacy or hiding the background or enhancing the look of a product or for purely aesthetical reasons.  The size, density and colour would determine the opacity and shading whereas the variety of dots, squares, checks and patterns will give many design combinations to achieve the desired effect.  It is not affected by moisture, oil, soaps, chemicals or detergents and retains its original appearance though out the life of the glass.  Applications:  Curtain walls, shower installations, glass doors, spandrels and partitions, etc.
  77. 77. Ceramic Printed Glass
  78. 78. Laminated glass  High security places, for example, banks, teller, and drive-through windows, ticket windows, gas stations, currency exchanges, armored vehicles, jewellery shops and burglar resistant showcases.   Other areas where laminated glass is used are:  • Curtain wall glazing  • Sloped glazing  • Skylights  • Glass roofs & floors  • Aquariums  • Animal observatory windows  • Safety glazing for partitions  • Security glazing for banks against bullets/ hand propelled objects.  • Earthquakes, high velocity winds & fire resistance applications.  • Museums  • Acoustic glazing
  79. 79. Tempered Glass  Tempered glass is an extremely strong glass which is heat treated to a uniform temperature of approximately 650ºC and rapidly cooled to induce compressive stresses of 770 kg/cm2 to 1462 kg/cm2 on the surfaces and edge compression of the order of 680 kg/cm2.  Tempered glass is not manufactured on float line. It is a separate process.  Tempered or toughened glass gains its added strength from the compressed surfaces. However, if a deep scratch or an impact penetrates the surface, the glass will break into a number of small particles.  The heat treatment process for tempered glass requires that all fabrication be completed prior to toughening.  Any attempt to cut, drill, grind or sand blast the glass after toughening may result in glass breakage. The heat treatment process does not change the light transmission and solar radiant heat properties of the glass.
  80. 80. Applications  It is used in commercial applications where wind, snow or thermal loads exceed the strength capabilities of normal (annealed) glass such as safety glazing for entranceway, railings, partitions or fire knock-out windows.  Tempered glass can be used in balustrades, escalator side panels, handrails, shower screens, bathtub enclosures, sliding/swing doors, squash, racquetball wall, showcases, partitions etc. Other areas where tempered glass should be used are:  • Mainly used for safety and strength  • Curtain walls of high-rise buildings  • Exterior and interior of buildings where strength is important  • Spandrels for walls and decorative paneling  • Door openings, showroom and lobby facades, escalator side plates, and  staircase handrails  • Viewing partitions of sports complexes, resorts and airports.
  81. 81. Curtain Walls
  82. 82. Heat Strengthened Glass  Heat strengthened glass is a type of tempered glass which has been strengthened thermally by inducing a surface compression of 422 to 658 kg/cm2 as compared to a range of 770 to 1462 kg/cm2 in case of fully tempered glass.  It is valued for its mechanical strength, which is twice that of normal annealed glass though half of fully tempered glass.  With the exception of strength and breakage haracteristics, heat - strengthened glass retains the normal properties of annealed glass.  Heat-strengthened glass provides necessary resistance to thermal stress associated with high performance glazing materials such as tinted glass and reflective glass.
  83. 83. Applications  Reflective glass is used in office buildings, high-rise buildings,  • Entrance  • Privacy windows  • Decorative walls  • Spandrel glazing  • Vertical and sloped glazing  Building facades
  84. 84. Insulated Glass  The insulating glass is a prefabricated unit made of two or more glass panes, separated by a cavity and edges-hermetically(A hermetic seal has the quality of being airtight. In common usage, the term often implies being impervious to air or gas) sealed together.  This edge seal not only binds the individual sheets of glass together to maintain the mechanical strength of the joint but also protects the cavity between the glasses from outside influences.
  85. 85. Insulated Glass
  86. 86. Applications  • Office buildings, hospitals, hotels, houses and buildings with exceptionally high heating or cooling requirements.  • Buildings that need the temperature and humidity strictly controlled such as telephone exchanges, laboratories, etc.  • Airport control towers, windows of coaches of trains, and other environments that need regulated atmosphere and prevention of condensation.  • Buildings near highways, railways and airports that need sound insulation property of insulating glass.
  87. 87. Consideration of selecting glass in hotel Depending on  The location  Use – roofs, window, door, partition, etc  Safety measure  Practicality  Functionality- molding, design,
  88. 88. Equipments for Surveillance  Surveillance is the monitoring of the behavior, activities, or other changing information, usually of people for the purpose of influencing, managing, directing, or protecting.  The word surveillance is the French word for "watching over"; "sur" means "from above" and "veiller" means "to watch“  In simple terms it can be defined as the “careful watching of someone or something.
  89. 89. Equipments of Surveillance  Apart from other sophisticated surveillance equipments such as Biometric Reader- retina recognition, voice recognition, finger print recognition or the surveillance from the satellite, hotel surveillance is done either personally or by the help of Closed Circuit Television Cameras which not only helps us to see what is going on but also record it at the same time on your PC, Laptops or smart phones as well.
  90. 90. HOW HOTEL VIDEO SURVEILLANCE CAN BE BENEFICIAL  Security – Hotel video surveillance can help keep your guests safe from theft and other criminals by helping you track your visitors and prevent break-ins on your property.  Prevent theft – Hotel security cameras can help keep intruders out of exclusive hotel areas like swimming pools and gyms, where theft is common. A surveillance system in your store room and other maintenance areas can uncover potential employee theft.  Remain competitive – Along with providing security, a professional video surveillance system gives your guests peace of mind while staying at your hotel, and can help you increase your return business and remain competitive in an aggressive market.  Flexible – Modern security cameras are easy to install and can be adjusted at anytime to fit your needs. Unlike analog CCTV cameras, wireless IP cameras don't require technicians, power tools, or miles of wiring. All you do is mount the cameras and start recording.  Remote monitoring – Adding an NVR (Network Video Recorder) to your security camera system gives you the ability to broadcast your surveillance footage over the internet. This breakthrough in surveillance technology allows you to monitor any of your cameras at any time from any internet connection,
  91. 91. POTENTIAL RISKS OF HOTEL/MOTEL SECURITY CAMERAS  Privacy – Protect the privacy of your guests and employees by keeping your surveillance cameras in public places like lobbies, restaurants, pool and spa areas, and meeting areas, and out of guest rooms and break rooms.  Damage – Cameras, especially when they are outdoors, can be damaged by storms or falling objects. While this kind of damage is rare, it's important to keep a secondary security system in place to protect your guests and property should they occur.  Outages – Power disruptions or surges can cause interruptions in recording or damage to your system
  92. 92. Types of CCTV Cameras  Indoor Camera: Indoor camera as the name suggests are used for indoor security mechanism. Depending upon your security needs, you can mount it at any suitable location inside the building. These are suitable for security in homes, schools, offices, hotels, etc. Outdoor Camera: Outdoor CCTV Camera is used for outdoor places. They are mostly used for entry and exit points with limited night lighting. Outdoor cameras typically have hard shell vandal-proof casings and a variety of lens options. IR Day/Night Camera: IR Day/ Night Camera are used for high alert security areas where surveillance needs to happen throughout day and night. In the daytime the camera functions like a normal camera with standard colors and at night it switches to low-lux black and white mode. When visibility decreases due to no-light at night, Infrared LEDs are automatically illuminated providing full security. These cameras are used by military personals, in parking lots, and high security zones. Dome Camera: Dome cameras are installed inside a dark dome and are designed in a way that they go unnoticed by visitors. They come in compact design for a discreet appearance. The thief does not know if the camera is recording. These cameras can also be rotated and tilted manually. Dome type cameras are used in public places like railway station, bus terminals, and other areas where there is huge gathering of
  93. 93. Types of CCTV Cameras  Bullet Camera: Bullet cameras are placed inside a bullet shaped housing, and they are used in residential places as well as commercial places. They are small in size, have an integrated design, and are really effective. They offer illuminate viewing even in darkness and are weatherproof as well. Vandal Proof Camera: Vandal proof cameras are used as outdoor security cameras. These cameras are sheltered within solid material and are covered by a "hub" of break-proof glass which doesn't hinder the quality of the video camera streams. It is difficult to break these cameras and this makes them perfect for high security. They are suitable for wall or ceiling mounting and are rain and fog resistant. Hidden Camera: Hidden cameras are compact in size and are used for secret monitoring. They are usually installed in public places like department stores, theatres, clubs, etc. Hidden cameras have a built-in recorder that records and broadcasts simultaneously. By using a large number of security cameras and networking them various strategic views of the place can be obtained. Pan Tilt Zoom Camera: Pan-tilt-zoom camera offers the ability to view and zoom in all directions. You can even set the camera to automatically rotate to different fields of vision
  94. 94. Consideration before buying CCTV System  Your hotel or resort's specific security needs depend on many factors. Consider each of the following when you are purchasing and configuring your hotel video surveillance system:  Where do you experience the most thefts?  How do you currently manage security at your hotel?  Do you feel like your surrounding area contributes to your overall security?  How would you describe your average guest?  Business travelers  Leisure travelers  Families  How is your hotel or resort laid out?  Single building housing guest rooms, amenities like pool and spa, and facilities.  Several buildings spread out over a large property  Have you ever had issues with employee theft?
  95. 95. Communication System  Communication is the most basic and the most important aspect or tool of efficient service and effective security.  Today hotel have adopted numerous communication devices which have eased the process of communication.  To respond quickly to a security need, a communication system is required to quickly notify staff responsible for the security function.  Our main aim is prevention is better than cure and this exactly fits in this definition.
  96. 96. Types of Communication Equipments  Paging System(Pager)- Alarm, Message or Call me  Walkie- Talkie(Two way radio communication)- Uses radio frequency to communicate  Telephone- the easiest and most efficient medium – intercom, PABX, etc.
  97. 97. Considerations while buying  The following things are needed to be considered before buying the communication equipments:  Size of the organization- Big, small, medium  Operational areas- Garden, Beach, Indoors, Basement  Distance- within the hotel premises, long distances, etc  Purpose- emergency awareness, message delivery, security check etc.  Durability  Functionality- specified to only one task or multi task, night visibility, internet connectivity  Design- easy to carry, small  Portability- hands free, wireless.
  98. 98. Alarm System  A burglar alarm is a system designed to detect intrusion – unauthorized entry – into a building or area. They are also called security alarms,security systems, alarm systems, intrusion detection systems, perimeter detection systems, and similar terms.  Burglar alarms are used in residential, commercial, industrial, and military properties for protection against burglary (theft) or property damage, as well as personal protection against intruders. Car alarms likewise protect vehicles and their contents. Prisons also use security systems for control of inmates.
  99. 99. Types of Sensors on alarm  In hotel alarm systems are often used for monitor the many entrances and emergency exits found throughout a hotel.  There are various type of sensors used in the alarm according to its different functions – fire, burglary, heat, smoke etc.  Some of them are:  Infrared  Ultrasonic  Smoke, heat, Carbon monoxide  Microwave  Vibration  Magnetic Field  Glass Break etc
  100. 100. Parts of an Alarm  The most basic alarm consists of one or more sensors to detect intruders, and an alerting device to indicate the intrusion. However, a typical premises security alarm employs the following components:  Premises control unit (PCU), or panel: The "brain" of the system, it reads sensor inputs, tracks arm/disarm status, and signals intrusions. In modern systems, this is typically one or more computer circuit boards inside a metal enclosure, along with a power supply.  Sensors: Devices which detect intrusions. Sensors may placed at the perimeter of the protected area, within it, or both. Sensors can detect intruders by a variety of methods, such as monitoring doors and windows for opening, or by monitoring unoccupied interiors for motions, sound, vibration, or other disturbances.  Alerting devices: These indicate an alarm condition. Most commonly, these are bells, sirens, and/or flashing lights. Alerting devices serve the dual purposes of warning occupants of intrusion, and potentially scaring off burglars.  Keypads: Small devices, typically wall-mounted, which function as the human-machine interface to the system. In addition to buttons, keypads typically feature indicator lights, a small mulch-character display, or both.  Interconnections between components. This may consist of direct wiring to the control unit, or wireless links with local power supplies.  Security devices: Devices to detect thieves such as spotlights, cameras &
  101. 101. Types of Alarm  Local Alarms:-  Local alarms are those not hard-wired to a central monitoring location and may serve as deterrents(A thing that discourages or is intended to discourage someone from some act.)  Examples is the local alarm that is integrated with the panic hardware on a fire exit. When the exit door is opened, the circuit is broken and the alarm sounds.  Contact Alarms:-  Contact alarms systems are hard-wired to a central point. so the same can be monitored and appropriate action may be taken when the alarm goes off. Silent alarms are always hard-wired to a central point and may be considered for cashier areas, storerooms, and other areas. From such a point, the alarm can be silently transmitted to the telephone room, police department, or private security company; both the police and the on-premises security personnel can be alerted.  Example of a contact alarm sometimes used in cashier areas that is helpful during robberies involves using a money clip that cannot be removed from a cash register without tripping a silent alarm.
  102. 102. Types of Alarm  Remote Alarms:-  Remote alarm systems typically relying some sort of transmission for example, the more elaborate microwaves, radio waves and photoelectric light.  Microwave detectors are active units which transmit and receive electromagnetic energy are designed to detect motion. Perimeter protection with microwaves is used in some properties due to its long range capabilities; its potential for stability, once adjusted; and its virtually tamper-proof characteristics.  This is best used in locations where unwanted movement should be detected.  Radio frequency (R F) fields trip an alarm when any intruder breaks the radio wave by moving into an R F field. As with the use of the microwave detector noted above, these systems are of greatest value in locations where there should be no motion.  This system is best used as an intruder alarm.
  103. 103. Types of Alarm  Photoelectric light beam is a filtered light beam passes between a sending and receiving unit; as is the case in R F field systems,any break in the beam sets off an alarm.  This system is generally used for outside perimeter control, especially in resort properties.  And Finally Fire Safety Alarms:-  While the use of some alarm systems is usually optional, fire alarm systems are generally required by local fire and safety Laws.  Fire alarms is required to alert employees of fires or other emergency conditions. Because of this reason all hotels, motels and apartments must have a fire alarm system in proper operating condition which is tested at least every two months.
  104. 104. Considerations while buying an alarm system  Initial cost  Maintenance cost  Durability  Visibility- easy detectable or not  Area of installation  Purpose / Need  Functionality- wireless, hard wired, size, shape, the sensors it uses.  Feasibility- whether the requirements of the system are easily available or not.
  105. 105. Equipments for Guest Room Security  When we travel to different places, the main reason that we choose a good hotel is the assurance of a safe, clean and comfortable room.  Different security equipments installed in the room makes the guest feel safe and comfortable even when they are travelling away from their own safe dwellings.  Hotel guest room security may be enhanced by the use of security equipment such as hotel/motel function locks, safety chains, and similar devices.  Secondary access limiting devices on sliding glass, balcony, and connecting room doors, access limiting devices for operational windows, a guestroom telephone or other communication device available for use 24 hours a day, a peephole in or window next to the guestroom door etc.  The Following are the areas and equipments in the guest room security:
  106. 106. Hotel Guest Room Locks:  Hotel Guest room Security locks can be a critical aspect of guest protection. Locks and locking systems are needed which lend themselves to the smooth and efficient operation of the property, but which are not easily compromised.  If a property uses a master keying system in which one key opens all or many of the property's doors, it should face the possibility that a master key may be lost or stolen. If this happens, every lock's code or combination ( that is, the arrangement of tumblers in the core of the lock) may need to be changed.  Depending on the type of locks used, this re-keying can be a relatively quick and inexpensive process or a long and costly one. [ One of the best ways to avoid this situation is to follow
  107. 107. Biometrics  A new and highly technical access control system involves biometrics. Such a system utilizes human characteristics which are unique to a specific individual. No two Fingerprints are same anywhere in the world , the retina or iris of an eye, and the size, shape, and even the print of a hand.  In Future biometric applications there would be the possibility to include a person's voice being recorded at check-in and immediately being transmitted to the door accessing a restricted guestroom corridor, guestroom, health club, point-of-sales
  108. 108. Secondary Access-Limiting Devices  Sliding glass doors another consideration in establishing the security of a guestroom. A number of secondary access-restricting devices are currently available and should be examined as possible additions to the single latch provided with each sliding glass door.  Hinged bars and metal and wood sections that can be placed in the sliding channel or additional lock units are sometimes used to add to the security of sliding glass doors.  A metal peg may be inserted in a hole drilled through both the sliding door and the frame to prevent the sliding door unit from being lifted out of the channel and removed from the frame.  Windows which open may need secondary latching devices. If local fire codes permit, devices which limit how far windows can be opened may be installed to help prevent intruders from entering through ground floor or balcony windows and to reduce or eliminate the possibility of children or even adults falling out of
  109. 109. View ports  Consider the need for the guest to be able to identify a caller before opening the door. A view port [door viewer or peephole] is one device that can serve this purpose.  A wide-angle view port maximizes the view of the corridor adjacent to the guestroom door.
  110. 110. Room Communications  Management should consider placing a telephone device in each guestroom. This telephone can be used by the guest to notify the property of emergencies or suspicious activities and by the property to notify the guest of emergencies like Fire, Bomb threat etc.  Nowadays hotels are exploring the feasibility of using two-way interactive cable television to provide security for emergency communication with the guest.  This facility usually delivers entertainment and programming to the guestroom, but it also has the capability to return communication via the same device. This permits monitoring of guest medical alerts, burglar alarms, and fire alarms etc.
  111. 111. In-Room Security Information  There has been a great effort on the part of the hospitality industry to effectively involve the guest as a member of the security team for a property.  Hotels are required to have a floor plan or an information card be provided which indicates the location of the guestroom in relation to fire stairwells. This information card also lists the steps to be taken by the guest in the event of afire emergency.  In addition to fire protection data, consider including security data on the guestroom door. Decals or notices may be posted that:  How to double lock the guestroom door.  Notification for the guest to indicate that not to open the door without first identifying the person seeking entrance.  Instructions on a tent card for all guestroom security devices.  Mention the availability of safe deposit boxes at the front desk on the Guest registration card.  Any additional information about the locality of the property.
  112. 112. Other Necessary Equipments  Smoke Detectors:-  Smoke or heat detection units are required by an increasing number of local jurisdictions. Regulations vary from those only requiring smoke and/or heat detectors in corridors, storerooms, and under stairways to those requiring full systems that provide protection in every guestroom, guest bathroom, public area, and back-of-the-house location.
  113. 113. Smoke Detectors and Heat Detectors  Smoke and heat detection units also vary in their characteristics; some have the ability to report a heat buildup prior to evidence of smoke or flame, while others respond only to smoke and other products of combustion.  Single-station hard-wired smoke detectors require that the unit be on electric wiring as opposed to battery power. In some cases where the sounding of a unit can put the building into general alarm, a public address system can advise guests and staff within the property accordingly.  Automated systems, which integrate all smoke detectors in each location with a master panel, permit staff to immediately determine where a smoke detector has activated and to respond accordingly.  There are also battery back-up systems for use during power failures (which frequently occur in a fire scenario) that may be installed as a third level back-up when auxiliary power generation activates at the time of a primary electric source interruption.  Many local jurisdictions enacted regulations requiring fully automated smoke detector systems in all new construction and the retrofitting of smoke detectors for all lodging
  114. 114. Fire Extinguishers:-  There are four classes of fires that a lodging property should be prepared for  1) Class A fires involve ordinary combustibles,  2) Class B fires involve flammable liquids,  3) Class C fires involve electrical equipment, and  4) Class K fires involve cooking oils and fats.  Tips: Although some jurisdictions will permit the elimination of fire extinguishers in a facility with a full sprinkler system, consideration should still be given to the use of extinguishers as they would permit the fighting of incipient fires rather than waiting for a fire to generate enough heat to activate
  115. 115. Carbon Monoxide Detectors:-  Carbon monoxide is a dangerous by-product of a malfunctioning water heater, kerosene heater, coal boiler, or any other wood, coal, or petroleum product unit. (It is also the most critical toxic gas generated in any structural fire).  There have been tragic incidents in which carbon monoxide from such units has resulted in the death of a guest or staff. Since carbon monoxide is invisible and has no smell, it cannot be detected by natural means.
  116. 116. Sprinkler Systems:-  Sprinkler systems are now mandated in an establishment four stories or higher, adhering to the Hotel and Fire Safety laws on each countries.  This requires a system covering back-of-the-house, public, and all guestroom locations.  Most jurisdictions now require full sprinkler systems in the new construction of any commercial occupancy regardless of the height of the structure.
  117. 117. Accident Prevention Signs:-  OSHA(Occupational Safety and Health Administration) classifies accident prevention signs into three categories:  1) Danger signs.  2) Caution signs and,  3) Safety instruction signs.  Danger signs: which indicate immediate danger, should be posted to warn of specific dangers and to warn that special precautions may be necessary.  Red should be the basic color for identification of all danger signs, which include restricted area, in case
  118. 118. Accident Prevention Signs:-  Caution signs: should only be used to warn against potential hazards or to caution against unsafe practices.  The color yellow has been used to advantage for marking physical hazards on stairs in both back-of-the-house stairways and fire stairwells.  Areas of construction or remodeling should have caution signs. Floor stand signs could warn guests of wet floors and to watch their step.  Safety instruction signs: should be used only where there is a need for general instructions relative to safety measures.  These signs are typically green with white lettering. Signs with green arrows, for example, could be used to note the path to follow between buildings or on trails.
  119. 119. Security Procedures  A hotel may be subject to numerous amount of threats. Some are foreseeable and some are not. It is always wise to be prepared and have a set of procedures laid down so that at the time of emergency, with appropriate in advance training, such procedures may not only help but reduce the risk level and casualties at emergency situations.  Nowadays, almost every hotel has a set of security procedures laid down for such emergency situations. Some of them are discussed in this chapter.
  120. 120. Key Control  The main aim of hotel is to provide safe and secure environment for guest and their belongings. Hence, proper key control will ensure that the guest rooms are secure and the guest property, as well as the guest, are safe.  For this a hotel should establish a clear procedure for the control of keys.
  121. 121. Procedures for Key Control  Authorization of a person to order keys from suppliers.  Control the number of keys to be duplicated and keep a strict record on the number of keys duplicated.  Keep the keys in a safe place. Keys kept at the Front Desk should not be left unattended or accessible to anyone reaching over the desk.  Ensure periodic inventory checks.  Replace locks immediately following a break-in or criminal activity.  Change locks at regular interval of time.(The police recommend a change once every two year). The cheapest system in a long run may be an
  122. 122. Procedures for Key Control  Make sure that the keys are retrieved from the guest on departure.  Maintain locks to ensure that they are always in good working conditions.  Key racks should be kept out of view of the public.  Set up a system whereby keys may only be issued on the production of the pass(key card) given to the guest on checking in which has to be returned at the time o checkout. In addition to this, the front desk staff should always verify name and room number(and any other information) of guest and check this against the hotel records before handing over keys.  Retrieve guest room keys involuntarily left on the front desk counter. A drop box should be made available.  Consider a practice of using keys that do not have he property’s name, address, logo or room number in them. This practice makes it much more difficult for the keys that have been lost to be traced to the appropriate property by who
  123. 123. Electronic Key System  A variety of electronic systems are available; most include one or more of the following elements:  A mortise lock integrated with an electronic card reader.  A key card which either communicates with the front desk computer and permits entry or which is compatible with the permission-level within the microchip in the lock set unit in the guestroom door. This establishes entrance capability either at the time the key card is being produced or upon introduction to the door lock.  A computer terminal at the front desk or adjacent area which produces the key card and selects the code which will permit entry by a new key card and will reject all prior units issued for that room.  A computer capable of providing millions of combinations for entrance to a guestroom.  A battery source and/or hard-wired system for energizing the lock system.  touch-pad system.  The capability of "timing" the card so it no longer functions as of a set time, such as upon check-out.
  124. 124. Surveillance and Access control  It is important that hotel security should know who are in the building and the purpose of their visit.  If the public is invited to patronize certain areas, such as bars, restaurant, banquet room, etc, it does not mean that other areas which are designated for guests, are also available to the public.  Anybody disguised as guest can get into the hotel property and remember always to keep on eye on suspected behaviour.
  125. 125. Precautions  There are certain precautions that are needed to be considered in monitoring access through non-public areas: Supervision of entrances E.g employee entrance, delivery entrances and service entrances.  The hotel will have many different entrances which have to be taken special care of.  Back-gate entrance of employee should be practiced.  Delivery entrance scanning, proper checking and proper time allocation should be kept in mind while receiving deliveries like food material, maintenance parts, guest room supplies.
  126. 126. Routine Patrolling of guest corridor.  Security personnel, guards or even elevator operators should have an eye on the corridors as these are accessible to only guest and any suspicious person with bags, or harmful arms, or equipments should be immediately informed or taken required action.  Apart from CCTV surveillance, patrolling from time to time will help increase the security perimeters as well as stop crime on time.
  127. 127. Elevator Control in high rise hotel buildings:  Elevators are the easiest way to get to guest rooms.  The elevator operator should politely and tactically ask the guest about the hotel rooms or where they are staying to cross check the guests if they are in-house guest or not.  If the elevator is not operated by an operator, then CCTV cameras should be continuously monitored by the security personnel for any suspicious guests.
  128. 128. Display of Staff identification on entrance, work hours and exit from the Hotel to all Staffs  Hotel should issue proper name tags or identity card so that one can easily recognize whether the person is a hotel staff or not.  While using the staff gate entrance or exit, presentation of staff ID should be practiced to ensure no unauthorized person enters through the staff entrance.
  129. 129. Packages/ Parcel check to guard against theft of hotel property by Employees  Any packages or parcel going out of the hotel should be checked before letting the hotel employee exit or return home.  Sometimes employees will intentionally take away small valuable hotel properties which may be undetected if not checked.
  130. 130. Identifying salesmen or deliverymen and their purpose of Visit.  Salesmen or delivery men should be asked to present their identification like visiting card or identity card and all details regarding the time of entry, purpose of visit and the name of the person they wish to see should be recorded in entrance registers or log books.  While entering, a proper visitor pass should be produced by the guard to ensure that the person(salesmen or deliveryman) is a visitor and came for an official purpose.
  131. 131. Secondary or emergency Exit and entrance should be monitored.  Fire exit points in hotel are another easy way to enter or exit the hotel.  Since we cannot lock the fire exit, frequent monitoring is required for those areas.
  132. 132. Every department should have an eye on suspicious activity and secure their own area from unauthorized persons.  Reporting the security personnel if any suspicious person or suspicious activity is taking place.  Unattended bags, car parked in no parking zone intentionally or in a very busy areas, new persons entering from the employee gate, guest refusing to shoe any form of identification, scanty baggage, etc.

×