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A Field Guide for Allies

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Karen delivered this talk at the AnitaB.org Male Allies 2018 Summit in New York City, March 29, 2018.

Publié dans : Technologie
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A Field Guide for Allies

  1. 1.  A Field Guide for Allies Karen Catlin Advocate for Women in Tech @kecatlin karencatlin.com © 2018 by Karen Catlin. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. “60% Of Women In Silicon Valley Have Been Sexually Harassed” “Mass Firings at Uber as Sexual Harassment Scandal Grows” “Tech Leavers Study: Tech is a hostile work environment if you’re not a straight white dude” “Google engineer's anti-diversity manifesto sparks outrage”
  3. 3. Goals 1. Greater awareness of what happens “in the field” 2. Share simple actions to create a more inclusive culture
  4. 4. I want a diverse workforce because .
  5. 5.  1. Improved problem solving
  6. 6.  2. More innovation
  7. 7.  3. Better decision making Photo by The Jopwell Collection
  8. 8.  4. Better financial performance
  9. 9. Got it. But what can I do?
  10. 10.  “Just like me” networks
  11. 11.  Common interests fuel networks
  12. 12.  Outside of work…
  13. 13. “Just like me” networks limit diversity •  Hiring •  Workplace trust Stretch assignments Promotions Reorgs, succession plans
  14. 14. At networking events, I introduce myself to people who don’t look like me. I attend events for underrepresented groups, to listen, learn, and network. When meeting someone at a tech event, I assume they’re technical. @betterallies  CTA: Diversify your network
  15. 15. Meetings
  16. 16.  Manterruptions
  17. 17.  Bro-propriations
  18. 18. of women report having questions directed to men that should have been addressed to them. 88%
  19. 19.  CTA: Amplify, Advocate I see you agree with the point Ana made earlier in the meeting. I’d like to hear Emma finish her thought. Mei’s the expert. Let’s ask her. @betterallies
  20. 20. Feedback
  21. 21. Women: less likely to receive feedback tied to business outcomes Shorter reviews Men: offered a clearer picture of how to get to the next level: What to keep doing What to improve “People like working with you.” “You are effective at building team consensus. You successfully resolved which features to prioritize in our last sprint, leading us to ship the product on time.”
  22. 22. 👩 •  Described as “supportive,” “collaborative” and “helpful” 2x as men •  76% of references of being “too aggressive” •  2x references to team vs individual accomplishments 👨 •  Reviews included words like “drive,” “transform,” “innovate” and “tackle” 2x as women •  3x feedback tied to biz outcome •  2x references to tech expertise •  More likely to be told where to grow technically  Performance Reviews
  23. 23. Raise your hand if you agree: I seldom hesitate to give difficult feedback.
  24. 24.  CTA: Give Equal Feedback @betterallies I give direct feedback. I don't ease up just to prevent hurt feelings. I focus on business impact, what to keep doing, and how to improve. I share the expertise I see & skills to learn. I write reviews of the same length for men & women.
  25. 25. Office Housework
  26. 26. of women report being asked to do lower-level tasks that men are not asked to do. 47%
  27. 27. Administrative Take notes Schedule a meeting Order food, make reservations Undervalued Train interns Write unit tests Clean up source code comments Join a committee or site council
  28. 28. Impact of office housework: •  Puts us in a subservient role •  Takes time away from important work •  Interrupts “flow” •  Prevents us from making killer points Photo by #WOCInTechChat
  29. 29.  CTA: Disrupt Office Housework I share the load. “Ann’s great at unit tests. But it’s the perfect stretch assignment for Dave.” I set up rotations for taking meeting minutes and other admin tasks. I clean up mugs and pizza boxes after our team lunch.@betterallies
  30. 30. We all have a role to play to improve diversity & inclusion
  31. 31. @betterallies maleallies.com
  32. 32. Appendix Slides
  33. 33. Elephant in the Valley •  47% asked to do lower-level tasks that men weren’t asked to do •  88% had clients/colleagues direct questions to men that should have come to them •  84% reported eye contact with male colleagues only, not me •  66% felt excluded from networking due to gender
  34. 34. Additional reading Women help make a group more effective at solving difficult problems www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100930143339.htm NCWIT study: teams comprised of men and women produced the most frequently cited software patents www.ncwit.org/resources/how-can-companies-promote-innovation-diverse-employees/how-can-companies-promote Cloverpop study on decision making www.forbes.com/sites/eriklarson/2017/09/21/new-research-diversity-inclusion-better-decision-making-at-work/#4f705c424cbf Catalyst study on gender & financial results catalyst.org/system/files/why_diversity_matters_catalyst_0.pdf Ruth Bader Ginsburg Used This Simple Trick to Cut Down on ‘Manterrupting’ fortune.com/2017/04/06/ruth-bader-ginsburg-supreme-court-advice-interrupting/ Obama’s Female Staffers Came Up With a Genius Strategy to Make Sure Their Voices Were Heard nymag.com/thecut/2016/09/heres-how-obamas-female-staffers-made-their-voices-heard.html Elephant in the Valley Survey - www.elephantinthevalley.com Why is Silicon Valley So Awful to Women? www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/04/why-is-silicon-valley-so-awful-to-women/517788/ Kapor Center Tech Leavers Study– www.kaporcenter.org/tech-leavers/ Stanford Clayman Institute Research: Vague Feedback Is Holding Women Back hbr.org/2016/04/research-vague-feedback-is-holding-women-back

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