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Word Document "The Cord" for March 2016

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Word Document "The Cord" for March 2016

  1. 1. THE CORD San Luis Rey Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order Mission San Luis Rey, Oceanside, CA. Gathering March 6, 2016 Mass in the Serra Center at 10:00 AM Community Prayer in the St. Clare Chapel after Mass Lunch in the O'Keefe Lounge from 12:00-12:50 PM General Meeting in the Guadalupe Room from 1:00-3:00 PM Council Meeting will follow at 3:00 PM Future Meetings: April 3, 2016, May. 1, 2016 June 5, 2016 We all know Padre Pio, but who is St. Leopold Mandić? by Patty Knap 02/09/2016 Pope Francis venerates the remains of Padre Pio and St. Leopold Mandić in St. Peter's Basilica on February 6, 2016. (Credit: © L'Osservatore Romano)
  2. 2. The bodies of two saints now lie on view in the Vatican at the request of Pope Francis for the Jubilee of Mercy. One is Padre Pio (St. Pio of Pietrelcina) who is the world- renowned stigmatic priest from Italy. The other is St. Leopold Mandić. Pope Francis asked the Capuchins to bring the relics of St. Padre Pio and St. Leopold to Rome for Ash Wednesday and for the commissioning of the “missionaries of mercy.” Most of us are familiar with Padre Pio, but who was St. Leopold? St. Leopold was also a Capuchin priest like Padre Pio. Born the youngest of 12 children in 1866 in the Montenegro area of Croatia, he was called Bogdan as a child. Throughout his life he suffered from severe abdominal pain as well as a severe stutter. Along with these ailments, chronic arthritis deformed his posture and hands. His bent spine gave him a height of just 4'5". He had poor eyesight and was usually in pain. Despite his lifelong physical problems, his was a life of faith and sacrifice. At 16, Bogdan began his studies at the Capuchin Seraphic School in Italy. He took the religious name, Brother Leopold, and made his Profession of Vows at 17. Brother Leopold was ordained a priest in Venice in 1890. He wanted to become a missionary in Eastern Europe, which was under siege by religious conflict, but his request was turned down because of his poor health. He was instead stationed at several friaries around Venice. He began to teach about the early Church Fathers at a school in Padua, where he became well known for his devotion to his students and his hours spent in prayer each night. Besides one year in an Italian prison during World War I for refusing to renounce his Croatian nationality, Brother Leopold would spend most of the next three decades devoted to spreading the faith in Padua. From his small cell, he would spend up to 15 hours a day hearing confessions and giving spiritual direction. He was known for his constant prayer, fasting, and sacrificing. His dream was to reunite the Catholic and Orthodox churches by going to the Orient, but that never happened. He became known as the Apostle of Confession and Apostle of Unity. He wrote a famous prayer for ecumenism, and was known to prophesy and to levitate. When his superiors would say he was too lenient with the people who came to him for confession, he would respond, “If the Lord wants to accuse me of showing too much leniency toward sinners, I'll tell him that it was he who gave me this example, and I
  3. 3. haven't even died for the salvation of souls as he did.” Leopold would often remark, “Be at peace; place everything on my shoulders. I will take care of it.” He once explained, “I give my penitents only small penances because I do the rest myself.” At nighttime, he would spend hours in prayer, explaining: “I must do penance for my penitents.” Brother Leopold was known to be especially fond of expectant mothers and young children. He set up orphanages for children without parents. He had a deep devotion to the Virgin Mary who he referred to as “my holy boss,” and he prayed the Rosary regularly. Each day he celebrated Mass at the side altar in the Little Office of the Virgin Mary. Then he would go around and visit the sick in nursing homes, hospitals and homes. He also visited sick Capuchin friars in the infirmary, encouraging them to keep the faith. Leopold used to repeat to himself: “Remember that you have been sent for the salvation of people, not because of your own merits, since it is the Lord Jesus and not you who died for the salvation of souls... I must cooperate with the divine goodness of our Lord who has deigned to choose me so that by my ministry, the divine promise would be fulfilled: ‘There will be only one flock and one shepherd’” (John 10:16). Brother Leopold suffered from esophageal cancer, which would ultimately lead to his death at age 76. On July 30, 1942, after an entire night of prayer and a previous day hearing confessions nonstop, he collapsed while preparing for Mass. He was brought to his cell where he was given the Last Rites. Friars gathered at his bed sang “Salve Regina,” and when they got to the words, “O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary,” St. Leopold died while singing the final words. The church and part of the friary where Brother Leopold lived were demolished by bombs during World War II, but as he predicted, his cell and confessional were left unharmed. He stated before his death, “The church and the friary will be hit by the bombs, but not this little cell. Here God exercised so much mercy for people, it must remain as a monument to God’s goodness.” Pope Paul VI beatified Leopold on May 2, 1976, and St. John Paul II canonized him during the Synod of Bishops on October 16, 1983. Leopold is hailed as the “Apostle of Unity.” His feast day is July 28. Read more: http://www.ncregister.com/blog/pattyknap/we-all-know-padre-pio-but-who-is-st.- leopold-mandi/#ixzz3zvBORsun
  4. 4. Notes from our Vice Minister,Ongoing Formation Let’s look at paragraph 18 of Our Holy Rule: “Moreover they should respect all creatures, animate and inanimate, which ‘bear the imprint of the Most High,’ and they should strive to move from the temptation of exploiting creation to the Franciscan concept of universal kinship.” As Dave suggested, just take one paragraph of our Holy Rule, and how would you re- write it? When I look at it, it tells me to look at things with the thought, “Do/Treat unto others as you would want them to do unto you.” If you were an animal or plant, just how would you feel when in need of water, as both need water, clean water, to live? Plants wither and die just as animals get sick and die without water. We need to find ways to clean things using less water, and especially fewer chemicals, as chemicals just contaminate the water so that it can’t be used until it is filtered and cleaned, many times with more chemicals. Just think about it. In continuing with Laudato Si, we are going to look at a couple of thoughts on Chapter 3. The first thought will be, “How can we both appreciate and respect the progress that technology has afforded us and still be cautious of the evils that can accompany such technology?” Q. 1 page 165 of the thicker book. When I think of technology, I think of computers, cellphones, medical equipment involving computers… etc. Just how do the computers and other technology help, hinder… our society in its care of our planet, and in our journey to God? The second thought, “Reflect on this statement: “We cannot Now just look at the faces in these two photos, note the smiles in the one w/out the electronics. Does that give a hint as to where electronics belong at the ‘dinner,’ or other meal table? This is just one example, I’m sure that you can come up with many more.No phones; results in interpersonalsharing Phones; no interpersonal sharing.
  5. 5. We cannot “presume to heal our relationship with nature and the environment without healing all fundamental human relationships.” What does this mean to you? How can you begin to heal your “fundamental human relationships?” Just how can we heal our relationships within our families, our communities and the world? Just how can we do this as a Fraternity (brotherhood of like-minded persons) doing our best to walk in the footsteps of Christ, and St. Francis? FormationRemindersfrom Sandy Baden,Formation Director Classes are held the Saturday before the meeting, Please call Sandy at 760-209-4466 for more information. God Bless, Sandy Baden, OFS Director of Formation Anniversaries of Profession (Professed) Mar. 8, 2009 David York (7 years) Mar. 9, 1997 Mary Behnke (19 7ears) Mar. 9, 1997 Patricia Dominguez (19 years) Mar. 20, 1994 Marjo Gray (22 years) Memorials March 2, 1995 Amanda Martineau March 9, 2012 Thomas F.M. Siersma March 11, 2012 Thomas Siersma March 15, 1995 Robert Wells March 16, 1989 Gertrude Brown March 28, 2001 Katherine Kundinger Birthdays March 2 Virginia Villicano March 9 Edna Patterson March 26 Karron Esmonde
  6. 6. Let us Pray for our brothers and sisters, especially: - Clara Sau Ho, Tuan’s mother who is in critical condition, Dr. says there is “No hope.” Prayers asked for her departing… - For the safety of David our Minister in his journeys during this busy time of year for him. - Mary Behnke, for healing of her arm after a fall in November. Also for her general health and well-being. - Marilyn Pollack – whose husband, Mike, passed away last month - Pat Dominguez, for strength and support as she cares for her husband Pepe. - For Pope Francis, Bishop Robert McElroy, for our pastors, priests, deacons and consecrated religious, including those in lay orders and institutes. - For the victims of the atrocities of ISIS throughout the world. - For all the other Secular Franciscans served by the fraternity’s outreach program. - All of our Fraternity members, especially: our council members, our brothers and sisters who are in formation, our elderly and or homebound who aren’t able come to our fraternity gatherings. - Members of all three Orders of the Franciscan Family who need our prayers. New, or missing requests, email Carol at, carol_imhoff@yahoo.com or TEXT me at 760-717-7608 From, “3rd SUNDAY OF LENT” St. Joseph Sunday Missal” © 1999 page 1132 Theme: The Need of Ongoing Reform: As long as you are in the process of growing, you are alive. As far as our physical condition is concerned, at a certain moment we feel that the process of decay has set in. True, we can slow it down by keeping ourselves in good shape, and a whole industry is even helping us to do so. But we cannot stop the process of getting old. It is different, however, with our growth as persons. We are most aware of our personal growth during the years of formation: students in school, engaged partners getting to know and love one another, religious during the novitiate. The key to a happy and meaningful life is to keep growing. Paul speaks of “maturing in Christ.” This is a lifetime job. The Lenten Season is a time of paying renewed attention to our growth as persons. Am I approaching the design God has in mind for me? In the Liturgy we are confronted with Moses who experienced God in the desert, and the Lord Jesus speaking of reforming our lives. Reforming is not an instant happening. It is an ongoing process. Am I growing as a person?
  7. 7. Photo/SocialPage . And the writing on the board says… Calendar 2016 Mar. Apr – Carol May June = TBD Election Setup Jul = Profession Aug = elections, picnic Aug 28th and 29th Sept = New Council Oct = Transitus (TBD) [Basically what is happening in the next 6 months.] Editor Dave, your points on 'humility'are just awesome.
  8. 8. Oh, last but definitely not least, remember your donation envelope for the Common Fund. The box will be waiting for you. Or mail to: Edward Upson 5058 Nighthawk Way Oceanside CA 92056 FRATERNITY COUNCIL Minister David A. York, OFS Home: 619-227-1414 capeX8R@mac.com Vice Minister Newsletter Editor, Email Prayer Requests Carol Imhoff, OFS 760-717-7608 carol_imhoff@yahoo.com Formation Directress Sandy Baden, OFS 760-305-8984 stbadenofs@att.net Treasurer Edward Upson, OFS 760-758-4801 mauiquest@aol.com Secretary Prudy Hrisanthopoulos, OFS Home: 760-941-4868 nonook@cox.net Councilor Vacant Councilor Penny Johnson, OFS Home: 760-599-4211 penjohnvista@yahoo.com Councilor Barbara Upson, OFS 760-758-4801 mauiquest@aol.com Spiritual Assistant Sr. Madeline Fitzgerald, OSC 760-295-0611 mfitzgerald@stfrancis- vista.org

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