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Stand Up to Ageing - Paul Gardiner 2015 PAJ Presentation

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Stand Up to Ageing - Paul Gardiner 2015 PAJ Presentation

  1. 1. Stand up to ageing: why sitting is the new smoking Paul Gardiner, PhD School of Public Health The University of Queensland, Australia @drpaulgardiner Positive Ageing Journey p.gardiner@uq.edu.au Brisbane, May 2015
  2. 2. Before we start… • Please feel free to stand, • and move • and sit • and stand • and sit etc…
  3. 3. Overview • How much sitting do people do? • Research and the media • Is sitting related to health? • Tips and things to try at home
  4. 4. Exercise IS good for you!
  5. 5. How I spend my day
  6. 6. What is sedentary behaviour? Sedentary Light PA Moderate PA Vig. PA Sedentary Light PA Moderate PA Vig. PA 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Metabolic Equivalents Any waking behaviour with low energy expenditure while in a sitting or reclining posture
  7. 7. How do you spend your day?
  8. 8. How sedentary are you? How much time in total did you spend sitting or lying down and •Working or volunteering •In a car or using public transport •Watching television or videos/DVDs •Using the computer or Internet •Eating •Reading or doing hobbies •Socializing with friends or family •Doing any other activities Remember to count any time in bed when you are not trying to get to sleep
  9. 9. Variations across the lifespan Sedentary behaviour (%)
  10. 10. How older adults spend their time
  11. 11. Sedentary behaviour research
  12. 12. Is sitting the new smoking?
  13. 13. Stand Up
  14. 14. The landscape has changed
  15. 15. 45 kcal/day 27 kcal/day 80 kcal/day 54 kcal/day Source: Lanningham-Foster et al., Obesity Research, 2003
  16. 16. Source: Church et al., PLoS One 2011 1 in 2 men 1 in 5 men Physical activity expended at the workplace has dropped dramatically
  17. 17. Incidence of coronary heart disease • Conductors Source: Morris JN et al. Lancet 1953: ii 1053-1057 2.7 per 1000 p.a. 1.9 per 1000 p.a. Drivers
  18. 18. Health risks of too much sitting • High sitting time associated with: o Diabetes o Cardiovascular diseases o Cardiovascular & all-cause mortality o Musculoskeletal symptoms o Chronic kidney disease o Colon cancer o Weight gain & development of obesity o Metabolic syndrome o Metabolism changes o ++++ Sources: Wilmot et al., 2012 & 2013 Diabetologia; Thorpe et al., AJPM 2011; http://www.who.int/occupational_health/publications/en/oehmsd3.pdf;
  19. 19. Health risks of too much sitting • High sitting time associated with: o Diabetes o Cardiovascular diseases o Cardiovascular & all-cause mortality o Musculoskeletal symptoms o Chronic kidney disease o Colon cancer o Weight gain & development of obesity o Metabolic syndrome o Metabolism changes o ++++ Sources: Wilmot et al., 2012 & 2013 Diabetologia; Thorpe et al., AJPM 2011; http://www.who.int/occupational_health/publications/en/oehmsd3.pdf; HIGH sitters had: 2 x risk of developing diabetes 2 x risk of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease 1.5 x risk of dying prematurely Compared to LOW sitters TV viewing >4 vs. <1 hrs/day Sitting >8 vs. <3 hrs/day
  20. 20. Prolonged sitting and health Every hour of TV viewing from age 25 reduces your life expectancy by 22 minutes Veerman et al 2011 Br J Sp Med
  21. 21. It is also important how long we sit for Time of day Long periods without getting up particularly detrimental Higher waist circumference Higher levels of blood fats & blood sugars
  22. 22. We all need to sit…. So how much sitting is too much?
  23. 23. New Australian Guidelines – sitting less • Minimize the amount of time spent in prolonged sitting • Break up prolonged sitting as often as possible • Sit less throughout the day • Stand up at least every 30 minutes
  24. 24. http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/Healthy_Living/Physical_Activity/Pages/default.asp x
  25. 25. Programs to change prolonged sitting • Stand Up For Your Health, Brisbane • Every Day Activity Supports You, Vancouver • Take A Break from Sitting, Seattle • Small Steps, Adelaide • Stand Up and Go, Melbourne
  26. 26. What worked for people • Time-of-day – Break up sitting time during the evening – Constant pattern of activity to avoid ‘slumps’ – Extending activities • Displacement – ‘Buy’ sitting time by increasing activity • Replacement – Substitute seated activities with standing • Reminders – Set timers to limit sitting
  27. 27. Try this out at home • Place the remote next to the TV so you have to get off the couch to change the channel • Do your ironing while watching TV • Stand up and walk around when talking on the telephone • Plan regular breaks when using the computer or reading • Stand up and stretch regularly • Extend your activities, e.g. hang the washing out in 3 trips
  28. 28. Thank you for listening CONTACT DETAILS Paul Gardiner The University of Queensland p.gardiner@uq.edu.au @drpaulgardiner

Notes de l'éditeur

  • We have changed our physical environment to encourage driving
    Move from small houses on big blocks to subdividing and creating big houses on small blocks
  • At home – instead of washing clothes or dishes by hand, we now use washing machines and dishwashers
    This means that we are not spending as much energy doing just day-to-day activities
  • In the workplace, physical activity levels have dropped dramatically
    In the 1960s, 1 in 2 men were physically active at work – now it is 1 in 5
    Even in the last 5 years at my work, I know that many of the tasks I used to do that required me to get up and move – like walk to the library, or file a paper – I now do all on my computer
  • The first evidence of the health impacts of all this sitting was shown in the seminal studies of Jerry Morris in the 1950s.
    Here – he compared the incidence of coronary heart disease of drivers of london’s double deckers buses – who typically sat about 90% of their work shift – to the conductors, who typically climbed 500-750 steps in a working day.
    Reporting that the incidence of CHD was substantially higher in the drivers compared to the conductors
  • However, it wasn’t until decade or so that the health impacts of sitting were revisited.
    Now – there is substantial evidence that too much sitting has both short term and long term impacts on health
    With associations observed with XXX (pick a few) – with more evidence growing daily
  • However, it wasn’t until decade or so that the health impacts of sitting were revisited.
    Now – there is substantial evidence that too much sitting has both short term and long term impacts on health
    A recent review of studies showed that people in the highest sitting category – regardless of how it was measured – had:
    2 x the risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or dying from CVD and
    1.5 times the risk of dying prematurely
    Compared to people in the lowest sitting category
  • Importantly – new research is showing that is not just how much you sit for, but also how long you sit for at one time
    This figure shows a simple depiction of a persons activity across the day. Sitting is in red, standing in yellow, and moving in green.
    You can see that they stand for a long period in the morning, and then sit for two long periods in the afternoon.
    We are now showing that these long periods of sitting without getting up are particularly detrimental, with prolonged unbroken sitting linked to higher waist circumference, and higher levels of blood fats and blood sugars
  • We do all need to sit – but how much sitting is too much?
    So how much sitting is too much and how often should I get up?
    Well – we don’t know yet
    But the new Australian guidelines for physical activity recommend minimizing the amount of time spent in prolonged sitting and breaking up prolonged sitting as often as possible
    And while we wait to get further evidence on just how much is too much, I recommend to sit less throughout the day, and to stand up at least every 30 minutes

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