Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 5 Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (20)

Similaire à Sales (20)

Publicité

Plus récents (20)

Sales

  1. 1. Your Personal Newspaper10 September, 2016 | created using FiveFilters.org The Attention-Starved Reality of Selling Sep 9, 2016 02:31PM How do you stand out and sell in a world of infinite choice, easy access and endless world-class products? We have too much of everything. But we are limited in our ability to give attention to everything. We can only read one book at a time, use one product at a time and talk to one person with full attention at any given moment. The world has been inverted. Entire channels have been opened up for everyone to participate and get started. The hard part is not getting access anymore. That’s the previous advantage industrial age companies and brands had. You can put out whatever you like. If you want to make a song or podcast, it’s easy to work it and get it published. If you want to sell some of your line of products, you can open up a BigCommerce store and start posting your wares with snazzy pictures and catchy copy. I am putting a thought out today by simply writing and pushing the “Publish” button. It’s out there for the world to consume and use. The product is the easier part today. The harder part is selling within an economy of scarce attention and endless options. While the opportunity is immense, we are constrained by what makes business what it is – people. You still have to attract someone to pay attention. Then move that person through desire and intrigue. The selling is a human process that requires care and connection with where someone is at to be able to appeal to their deepest desires. And it’s a hard nut to crack on a mass scale as well within the intimate part of the sales funnel where someone says, “Yes.” It’s a game of process, consistency and acumen to dial into the point of resonance. The world is indeed flatter. Everyone can play now with products they want to sell. The question is whether you will be strategic and personal in your approach to selling or simply throw noise that gets ignored out into the world. What’s your strategy? Need one? Send me a note. [contact-form] Reciprocate and Be Happy Sep 8, 2016 03:00PM One way to be frustrated and unhappy is to keep giving and finding a lack of reciprocation. It can sound noble, but you can also get burned out from a lack of reward which comes naturally through trading. Healthy and fulfilling relationships depend on trading. A vibrant economy comes from efficient trade. Merit and achievement come from trading up with effort, intentionality and good deal making. You may not be clear in this area. You may not be happy. How about taking a look at how you do business and life with this simple focus by examining who reciprocates. Then invest your best in the people that like to reciprocate. It will make you much more happy than being drained by takers or those that don’t partake in reciprocating. Here’s an easy process to implement: 1. Look at the people in your life you want to build relationships with. 2. Think deeply about what they care about. 3. Give each person value first by being valuable. 4. Watch. 5. Trade when they trade. In step 4 above, if you don’t see reciprocation, determine whether your act was real value or only valuable to you, not the other person. Try again if you determine you missed on value. If you did provide real value, then you likely have a taker. Restrain yourself and leave the ball in their court. Trading is healthy, not only for good business, but it is also for sustainability. The last thing you want to do is build up resentment and burn out. Life is short, so invest in the best people. Life is also long in how many opportunities there are to give. Best to place your bets in the areas that reward you well. What do you think? Who can you trade with regularly with your best? 1
  2. 2. The 3 Most Natural Entrepreneurial Traits Sep 7, 2016 02:57PM Are entrepreneurs born or made? Yes. They are both. I see those that walk that arduous journey strive well, but if you don’t have the natural traits then it’s a lot more work to be aware of your weaknesses. Ultimately, entrepreneurship is about decision making. And your natural instincts, especially under stress, will drive your next 100 decisions in a completely different direction than someone who is wired different from you. Some people are more wired to be workers. They are comfortable taking direction and working within an offense that is well defined. Workers are important around execution. Then there are managers. They organize ideas and use resources efficiently whether it’s people, technology or budgets. But the entrepreneurs are a different breed. They are comfortable with ambiguity and are thinking big while working small. The challenge of dealing with uncertainty and risk requires a special instinct around keeping the goal clearly in mind and making sense of the ever changing landscape of uncertainty. Can I turn someone into an entrepreneur? No. That’s a journey that someone who is not naturally wired has to choose. It will be harder. But, I can tell you the kinds of business coaching clients that are the easiest to work with. They have these 3 natural traits: 1. High Cognitive Ability. They think conceptually and strategically. It’s not the day-to-day thinking, it’s the ability to see the invisible and be comfortable with ambiguity. This is a measurable quality. Thinking in terms of ideas, principles and how today’s actions relates to a future vision keeps steadiness in the journey towards something that has to be forced into existence. These are not practical people. They are idealistic. We have plenty of practical people that take the entrepreneurs’ ideas and use them because they work. High cognitive thinkers are unnatural and disruptive. 2. High Goal Orientation. High goal people are easy to work with. They can handle many different goals and move them to scale. Scaling is critical in the path and being able to see what the most important priorities to deliver on is a natural real-time instinct that high goal people have. They want to set direction, not necessarily take direction. They are always thinking about leverage and knocking out big goals. They work asymmetrically in seasons of high intensity and rest. 3. Low Detail Bent. Entrepreneurs want to see how things work and start, but they are looking to delegate. Technicians hold on. Low detail people look for resources to get things they know work done so they can move onto further innovation, discovery and trail blazing. They can settle for lower quality to move the bigger milestones. They don’t like to waste time and value being able to move with action rather than overanalyze something that is largely known. These traits are inherent. We all have different brains and the way we see the world and move in it is innate from how we are wired. Over thousands and thousands of hours coaching owners and executives, I have seen anyone with these natural bents move towards innovating with much more ease than those that might lack the hard wiring. Are you on the entrepreneurial journey or considering it? Consider taking this strengths test and let’s have a discussion to see why you would or would not do well at entrepreneurship. Think Big But Work Small Sep 6, 2016 01:35PM There’s no shortage of opportunities today. In fact, it’s cheaper and more convenient than ever to envision and put an idea you may have into play. Imagine trying to make your idea happen in the 1960’s. It would be both extremely expensive and difficult to get it out for others to even take notice. That’s not the problem anymore. You can get your idea started and put out into the world. However, it’s that easy for everyone else these days as well. You are inevitably playing in a crowded field. The hard part is getting enough attention to even matter. Everyone is a producer and everyone is a brand. The dichotomy we face is how to go big in our ideas and keep that ever before us while we test in small steps. All of your assumptions have to be tested. You might assume a certain group will like your idea. If they react with little enthusiasm, it’s time to reevaluate immediately. And you can know this by putting a small test out there that represents the big idea. You can keep the idea big with small steps in the implementation to gauge how things will work in reality. When you see positive feedback, you can enhance your idea and invest more time, money and energy. The hard part is getting creative to solicit the reaction you are looking for before going big. The temptation to go big early may come from our love for the idea vs. something that actually works to make people happy. That becomes more about you rather than those that will benefit. We live in a crowded world. And people have access at their fingertips to whatever might appeal to their curiosities, pleasures or productivity. Thinking big and working small is a strategy that can help you avoid risks out of the gate with good intentions. How can you simplify and test your assumptions? Embracing Consolidation Sep 2, 2016 02:44PM We are on a continuous journey of increasing efficiency. That’s what you feel happening around you when your job disappears or businesses come and go. There are only customers and what they want. There’s only the 2
  3. 3. collective thinking from an enormous amount of talented people compounding on top of existing technologies and platforms. These are macro forces that are working towards change on massive scales. We didn’t have a world ten years ago where everyone had a smart computer in their pocket with infinite computing power. Today, we have a smarter citizenry that is plugged in and able to find whatever answers they are seeking. The wild west tends to get organized over time. Standardization happens. A few platforms rise to the top. Consolidation is natural to take advantage of economies of scale and allow network effects within an ecosystem. You can try and fight Google with a better search engine, but you will lose. The game has been played and consolidation has occurred. You can try and build your own platforms, but why not use the ones that exist already and focus on the content as value instead of the technology? Every industry is getting touched because we are all contributing in how we do business, access information and connect with others. And if you are not consolidating within your own industry, then someone else will do it. Again, it’s natural. It’s easier to plug in. It’s easier to get started and make your idea happen. But the hard part is standing out and being noticed because everyone can participate and put their shingle out now for little to no cost. There’s no need to differentiate on using something different or isolated from everyone else. The greater value lies around the human part of our experiences. Being human and making an impact with insights, emotion, experience and connection is where the real value lies. Don’t waste your time fighting consolidation or getting enamored with technologies and platforms. That time has passed on so many fronts. Get on with the business of putting your work, heart and thoughts out there and lead. It’s a much better strategy in a commoditized, consolidating world. The Problem with Leveling Up Sep 1, 2016 01:46PM The Peter Principle sure can be observed frequently and predictably, not only in hierarchies, but in new endeavors. Just because something worked at a lower level of pursuit does not mean it will work in the next level up. Common sense? Yes. But it is a principle that repeatedly gets reinforced by the comfort zones that those leveling up tend to carry with them into new opportunities or roles. The problem with leveling up is that blind spot of underestimating the new game. We want the money, reward or prestige, thus, it is why we push towards something bigger, perhaps in a larger operation, new market or product development. Thus, we see the problem of rising to the highest level of incompetence. At some point, what worked in one situation or level does not work in the next level. It’s a new game. New games require new skills, mindsets and approaches. Just because you can work at small scale does not mean you are operationally sound to work at large scale. Or if your familiarity with one vertical market has gleaned amazing success, it doesn’t mean you can all of a sudden have the same conversation style in a completely different market segment. Leveling up is a natural pull that is attractive. More equals better right? The enticement can be seductive to step into a new level. Since you have already had some kind of success, then moving up becomes the next step. But, before you push and drive, how about taking stock of your own abilities and limitations. Assume you do have limits. Will those be your achilles heel in your new challenge? Ask the simple question, “What do rock stars in that next level do different than I do?” It may be hard to be honest. But it will save you an immense amount of heartache and disappointment. Otherwise, the better strategy might be to stay where you are and make it more efficient if you are not willing to pay the price of thinking hard about what’s required in the next level. Make Things Happen, Don’t Wait Aug 31, 2016 01:53PM I am not sure there are many safe places to hide any more. You can’t hang low collecting a paycheck hoping your bosses don’t notice. And everyone’s getting squeezed. I have already been in several conversations with business owners this past week and we were talking about reducing overhead and running their businesses leaner with less people. It’s common sense thinking for an owner. They are in the business to serve their customers and make money, not necessarily be a professional employer. The great news, however, is that all this change, all this speed and all this access to tools allows anyone to make things happen. Living in quiet desperation is painful and unnecessary. If you have been practicing, like most people, the habit of waiting for something to happen, snap out of it. That kind of habit is a sure way of setting yourself up to lose. Things happen because of the people that go out into the world and make things happen, not waiting for something to happen. It starts with an idea. And if you don’t have any ideas, then start practicing thinking and sharing your ideas. When you are clear and determined, start pulling the resources towards your idea. Those are the people, apps, tools and other things you need to make your idea work. It’s not expensive compared to 20 years ago. You have more resources available to you than ever before. But if you are waiting around waiting for someone else with ideas to approach you and invite you into a gig or opportunity, then you are missing out on 3
  4. 4. the opportunity to develop the skills you need to survive today. The cheese has moved and the world is quickly favoring those that make things happen, not wait for something to happen. Try getting someone to follow you today on one idea. Then do it tomorrow and every day. You will be getting in the game around you. Managing the Ask Aug 30, 2016 01:40PM If you feel overwhelmed in life or seem to be putting out fires all the time without much forward progress, then consider how you manage expectations. I can understand that when you want to be helpful or valuable that it is easy to jump at requests. Or sometimes, you may not know that you are being asked for something because of your eagerness. Someone may want something from you and you see it as helping. Depending on your relationships and the frequency you are asked for help, consider managing the ask with your own ask back. Someone might say, “Can you get help me put this presentation together?” or “Could you get this work done for me?” The ask can come in many different forms. And the thing is that there’s not a cost for asking. But you can create one for those that might freely use your time, attention or money by simply asking back. “Sure, can you do me a favor first … ? or “Not a problem. Glad to help. How about you do this first and then get back to me and let me know what you find.” You can be simple, polite and free. You can lead by seeing if the person requesting your resources is willing to pay a small cost to value the request they make of you. Why is this so important? So you don’t become resentful. You don’t have to be subject to the whims of people. We live in a fast moving economy and you have goals of your own and only so much energy. If people can get something for nothing, surely they will. But that’s not their fault. It’s simply deal making. And you want to exchange value with the traders that are willing to pay a cost, however small, to show a gesture of good faith. How can you practice asking back to make better deals with others and yourself? The Goal is Not to Be a Professional Employer Aug 29, 2016 02:28PM Being a professional employer has a weird deal to it. You take the risk, responsibility and social burden of growing a business. However, this onus of responsibility is increasingly getting questioned where efficiency is proliferating, thus we find the middle class diminishing at a rapid rate. And the largest reason for this squeeze is that those middle class jobs were inefficient in the first place. They were information bottlenecks that a cubicle factory produced and called value. However, automation is changing the scene in a rapid way. Cloud computing, artificial intelligence, machine language, predictive analysis and infinite computing are right there for any entrepreneur to implement. The overhead of office space, server racks, sales organizations, and yes, white collar labor, is not a requirement to get started. When you get squeezed by market forces or a crisis, the luxury of labor becomes a scrutinized cost. Business owners and managers have to streamline and get more efficient. And the reality is that they can change things up at any time. But they may have overpaid in business operations until a crisis becomes a scapegoat. They then have the business decision to embracing the reality that jobs can be accomplished more efficiently with technology. And when the business cycle does come back and turn, is there good reason to add more labor when automation has taken root and filled the gap? The goal of an entrepreneur is to bring immense value to customers. One tool to make this happen is to add labor towards this end. But when entrepreneurs discover that they can do much more with less because platforms and automation are ubiquitous and cheap, then why would someone want to be inefficient when they have found dramatic low-cost efficiency. And what about the lot of the employee? Well, they have to figure out how to bring value to others as well. There’s no free ride. There are less places where they can be told what to do and what to think by someone else taking the risk. Instead, they can find customers and automate as well. It may be scary, but by necessity, this is happening repeatedly by people making that mindset shift. And the fact that it is being done so regularly and en masse takes away the argument of employment as a limited option. Employment is a means, not an end. Bringing value and doing it efficiently for a marketplace is why a business exists in the first place. It’s hard enough driving that value. But getting mixed signals in your head and doing second things first can make the job much harder. Focus on bringing immense value with efficiency. If it happens to involve employing others, so be it. But your burden is on your customer first as an entrepreneur. 4
  5. 5. Don’t Hide Behind Spending Money Aug 26, 2016 02:22PM It is so fascinating to see how exponential growth from lower cost in technology is flattening the world. There is unprecedented democratization around bringing our ideas to market. And it starts with an idea. Many people that are trying entrepreneurship start out with money. Dumping money into building something perfect is an easy way to hide. It’s the Field of Dreams mentality of “Build it and they will come.” The reality is that spending money on an untested idea is more like “Build it and you will likely miss.” There is plenty of technology and platforms to see if your idea even has legs. The concept has to be first put out there to see if you can get people to try it out. Here’s a simple example. If you have some annoying problem working, cooking or fixing, try putting your idea on Quirky. See if your starting concept gets some other influencers. It was extremely hard to make your idea get to some kind of physical product because of the design, engineering, prototyping, manufacturing, and many other steps in a go-to-market process. Now, you can use a platform, connect your idea with the world and see how a simple ember of an idea can turn into a bonfire of a product that changes the world. Don’t start selling your idea. Prove your idea first. Use platforms that are near zero cost. Work hard at seeing if people will even buy in. If you can see if people like and will buy something at a small scale, with imperfection, then scaling with perfection is the second step. Doing the second step first often kills otherwise good ideas and it’s not a great entrepreneurial strategy when you have the resources to help you be a prototyper. No need to be an idealist. What can you test first? 5

×