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Games and Activities book

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ONE SWEET GAME BOOK
“Life is more fun if you play games.”
- Roald Dahl
ONE SWEET GAME BOOK
“Life is more fun if you play games.”
- Roald Dahl
Compiled in 2017
This game and activities book is a collaborative effort of many intelligent
and creative minds. It is a f...
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Games and Activities book

  1. 1. ONE SWEET GAME BOOK “Life is more fun if you play games.” - Roald Dahl
  2. 2. ONE SWEET GAME BOOK “Life is more fun if you play games.” - Roald Dahl
  3. 3. Compiled in 2017 This game and activities book is a collaborative effort of many intelligent and creative minds. It is a far from complete list, and many of the games can and should be adapted to keep your group engaged and entertained – your creativity is encouraged! Our hope is that this collection helps those in the field of education and adventure to create better experiences and stronger bonds within your group of students or participants. Major contributions from Broadreach, Inc. and the Tahoe Rim Trail Association. Additional contributions by the Tahoe Institute for Natural Science, the Boys & Girls Club of Lake Tahoe, SOS Outreach, and other creative and generous individuals.
  4. 4. i TABLE OF CONTENTS Group Development............................................................................................................1 General Game Guidelines....................................................................................................2 Ideas to Create Teams & Form Pairs...................................................................................3 Icebreakers: Name Games ..................................................................................................5 • Adverb Name Game • First Word on Your Mind • Likes Name Game • Name Game Toss • Object on Your Back • Peek-a-Who • Shout Out! • Squash • You Me Left Right Icebreakers: Get to Know You.............................................................................................9 • M&M or Skittle Game • Once Upon a Time – aka Where the Wild Wind Blows • Partner Introductions • Questions • Tri-Question Walkabout • The Bus – aka Either/Or • 2 Truths & A Lie Group: Problem Solving....................................................................................................13 • Diminishing Load • Helium Poles • In the Loop • Match My Card • Traffic Jam • Zen Counting Group: Communication.....................................................................................................19 • Ball Collectors • Barn Yard • Blind Birthday Game • Body English • Impulse – aka Electricity • Jane’s Angry Apes – aka Tank Tag
  5. 5. ii • Perfect Square • Search & Rescue – aka Blind Retriever • Skin the Snake • Slipped Disc • Telephone • Tiny Little Teaspoons Group: Trust.......................................................................................................................27 • Body Snatchers • Come to Me • Don’t Laugh at Me – aka The HA Game • Trust Lead • Wind in the Willows Group: Team Building .......................................................................................................31 • Chocolate River • Diminishing Circles – aka Shrinking Ship • Human Knot • Popsicle Push Ups • Reach For Your Goals Just For Fun: Tire Them Out .............................................................................................35 • Alaskan Baseball • Birdie on a Perch • Johnny Johnny • Man Hunt • The Tail that Wags the Dog Just For Fun: Wake Them Up ............................................................................................39 • Elbow Tag • Metamorphosis • Pass the Loop • People 2 People • Rock Star • Screaming Toes Just For Fun: Sitting Down................................................................................................43 • Assassin – aka Frogger • Drawing in the Dark • Honey, if You Love Me, Please Smile • Mafia • Making Rain • Story-Story
  6. 6. iii • Telephone Pictionary Just For Fun: Silly ..............................................................................................................47 • Ark, Snark, Bark • Charades • Finger Fencing • Fox in the Hen House • Group Thumb War • Guess Who??? • Hagoo • In the Way of the Adverb • King Frog • Museum • Ninja • Push • Smog’s Jewels • Triple Charades • Warp Speed Just For Fun: Parlor Games...............................................................................................53 • Bang Bang • Behind the Green Glass Doors • Black Magic • Broom Sniffing • Can You Pogo? • Counting Sticks • Crossed, Uncrossed • Johnny Johnny (Whoop!) • Man on the Moon • The Minister’s Cat Expanding Comfort Zone ..................................................................................................59 • Anonymous Feedback • Do This! • Maze • What did you Call Me? Science Games...................................................................................................................61 • Bear-Salmon-Mosquito • Camouflage • Charades with a Purpose – aka LNT (Leave No Trace) Charades • Jays & Chickadees
  7. 7. iv • Mineral Tag • Nature Bingo • Nature Web • Oh Deer! • Pollination Tag • Rockity Rock Rock Rock! • Solar Star – aka Eclipse • Survivor • Tree Factory • Wildfire Trail Games: Pass the Time...............................................................................................73 • Each One Teach One • Guess My Career • Pop Culture Acronyms • Ten Minute Mysteries • This or That? – aka Would You Rather • Word String Scavenger Hunt Ideas........................................................................................................77 Trip Trivia Ideas .................................................................................................................79 Additional Games & Notes ................................................................................................81
  8. 8. 1 GROUP DEVELOPMENT Understanding the stages of group development will help you to figure out which games and activities are appropriate for your group at various points in your journey together. Originally developed by Bruce Tuckman, this model dictates that these phases are all necessary and inevitable in order for the team to grow, face up to challenges, solve problems, plan for the future and deliver positive results. The stages of group development are as follows: Forming: This is the initial stage of group development in which most members of the group are positive and polite. The leader plays a prominent and dominant role at this stage to help shape the group by making roles, responsibilities, and expectations clear. This stage can last for some time as people work to get to know each other, and is facilitated by activities that allow them that opportunity. Storming: This is the second stage of group development in which people start to push against their boundaries to figure out where they fit in. This can manifest as conflicts within the group, or lack of tolerance or willingness to grow by members of the group. It can be challenging to leave this stage, and easy to fall back into. As a leader, this stage can be best facilitated by encouraging open communication and active problem solving as a group. Norming: This is the third stage of group development in which group members can effectively resolve their own differences, appreciate each other’s strengths, and acknowledge their responsibilities toward a common group goal. As a leader, you can facilitate continuing this stage (rather than reverting back to storming) by giving them new and different challenges to work together, and giving them opportunities to show their individual strengths to be recognized and appreciated by the rest of the group. Performing: This is the fourth stage of group development, and what every group should strive to achieve. It is not easy to get here, and requires careful facilitation, but is well worth the effort. As a leader of a group in this stage, your role can shift more toward participating rather than leading, as the team is able to make necessary decisions and work without friction to achieve group goals. Adjourning/Mourning: Added later to the original four stages, this is the point where the group breaks up and moves onto other things. It can be the end of the trip or the end of a school year. As a leader, there’s not much you can do during this stage beyond helping group members to reflect on what they have accomplished together.
  9. 9. 2 GENERAL GAME GUIDELINES 1. Make sure that the game environment is relatively safe. a. Remember you can’t prevent every possible accident or problem – you will drive yourself and your students crazy by trying. b. A certain amount of risk is essential, but safety should be your FIRST consideration. c. Have the students check around for hazardous objects. d. Have your first aid kit handy. 2. Start with simple games or rules and work towards more challenging ones a. Complicated or physically challenging games can discourage participation. b. Judge the comfort level of the group and decide on a game accordingly. (i.e. don’t play a game that risks personal embarrassment on the first day) 3. Don’t intervene unless it’s absolutely necessary. a. Games can be ruined by too much intervention or interruption. b. You should be playing with them anyway! 4. Discreetly support fairness and good power management. a. Engineer consensus regarding what games to play, how to play, and what to do if there is a problem. b. Try to make sure there is equal participation without intervening too much. 5. You don’t necessarily have to debrief the game. Kids might eventually get worn out of debriefing and will want to simply play a game and have that be it. If you sense that they are sick of it, just do a simple and silent thumbs up/thumbs down debrief, asking if they liked it, if they thought it went well, if they learned anything about themselves from it.
  10. 10. 3 IDEAS TO CREATE TEAMS & FORM PAIRS Sometimes when you need to form teams or pairs, you find people group together in the same way each time. If you need some inspiration to spice it up, or a reason to get them to work together with someone new for each activity, game, or task, here are some ideas to get you started. Teams: Have everyone grab a partner (or if you need more than two teams, have them get into groups of the number of teams you need). In their pair/group, decide who is what of options you give them. EX: peanut butter or jelly; Ren or Stimpy; rock, paper or scissors; Ravenclaw, Slytherin, Hufflepuff or Gryffindor; etc. Then have all of one type group together to form a team. Teams or Partners: Group by closest birthday, favorite color, favorite animal, middle initial, etc. Have everyone say theirs out loud and you can figure out how best to group them according to the factoid they told you. Partners: Have them form two teams of equal size and get in a line shoulder to shoulder. Have those two lines face each other. The person across from them becomes their partner. Keep in mind, you don’t always have to construct teams or groups. You can ask students to find someone they don’t know well, or let students be with who they want. It all depends on the point of the game or activity, where the group is in their development, and where you are trying to get them to be. Also sometimes they will catch onto your tricksy methods of dividing them, and start to mess with your system. The best way to keep them on their toes and accomplish the goals you and they set for the group is to keep switching it up and play to the strengths of your group and group members.
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  12. 12. 5 ICEBREAKERS: NAME GAMES These games are designed to help members of a newly formed group remember each other’s names. ADVERB NAME GAME Time: 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for the members of your group to begin to feel comfortable with each other. Directions: In this game, you circle up and say an adjective that describes you using the first letter of your first name, the followed by your name. EX: “I am Awesome Andrew!” Then the next person goes, but he has to remember the ones that came before him. So the last person to go has to remember all the names and adjectives that were given. No repeats! FIRST WORD ON YOUR MIND Time: 10 min Equipment: Object to be tossed among group members Objective: Providing opportunity for the members of your group to begin to feel comfortable with each other in a lighthearted way. Directions: When using the object, this game is a fast one. The person who starts says a word and tosses the object to someone else. That person says the FIRST thing that comes to mind. No hesitating! Get it moving fast to make it fun and enlightening! LIKES NAME GAME Time: 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for the members of your group to begin to feel comfortable with each other. Directions: In this game, you circle up and say a noun that you enjoy that begins the first letter of your first name. EX: “I’m Maggie and I like monkeys!” Then the next person goes but he has to remember the ones that came before him. So the last person to go has to remember all the names and everyone’s likes!
  13. 13. 6 NAME GAME TOSS Time: 10 min Equipment: Object to be tossed among group members Objective: Providing opportunity for the members of your group to begin to feel comfortable with each other. Directions: In this game, you hold an object, say your name and something about yourself, then toss the object to someone else. The receiver then thanks you and says something about themselves. EX: “Thank you Jordan. My name is Josh and I don’t like watermelon-flavored candy.” Instructors can let the students choose whatever they want to say about themselves or pick a category of sharing. EX: Where you live, where was your favorite Scuba dive, what is your favorite band, a vegetable you don’t like? Be creative and make it fun! OBJECT ON YOUR BACK Time: 15 min Equipment: Index cards and pens/pencils Objective: Providing opportunity for the members of your group to begin to feel comfortable with each other. Directions: Using an index card or piece of paper, write twelve (or one for each person in your group) things that have to do with your trip or surroundings. EX: tank, sunset, dolphin, full moon, dive flag, shark, main sail, etc. Attach one card on the back of each student’s shirt. Then when everyone is ready, each student goes up to someone, shows them the card on their back, introduces him/herself and shakes hands with their partner. Then they each get to ask one yes/no question, and then find a new partner to ask. EX: “Am I alive?” “No.” If they think they know what they are they can guess. When they get it right, they put their card on the front of their shirt and continue to play until the last person gets theirs. PEEK-A-WHO Time: 15 min Equipment: Sheet or tarp Objective: Providing opportunity for the members of your group to begin to feel comfortable with each other. Directions: Separate students into two groups. Hold up a sheet in between the two groups. With one person from each group up at the sheet, drop the sheet. The first
  14. 14. 7 person to say/shout the name of the other person “wins” that person for their side. Play until all students are on one side. SHOUT OUT! Time: 10 min Equipment: A single object to use as a place-marker Objective: Fast-paced, fun initial name game. Directions: Form two large circles next to each other, separated by a line or object. Have the circles rotate in opposite directions. When a facilitator yells “STOP”, the person in each circle closest to the line/object has to shout the other person’s name. The first person to correctly name the other person gains that person into their circle. The goal is to get the most people in your circle. SQUASH Time: 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Fast paced funny initial name game. Directions: There is one person in the middle of a circle as the Caller. Everyone goes around the circle and introduces themselves. The Caller points at someone in the circle and squashes them by saying “squash!” The squashed person crouches down and the two people on either side of them are now in a race to say the other’s name first. The loser is the new Caller in the middle. YOU ME LEFT RIGHT Time: 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Fast-paced initial name game. Directions: There is one person in the middle of a circle as the Caller. That person introduces themselves and then the group takes five seconds to meet the people next to them. The Caller points at someone in the circle and calls either “You”, “Me”, “Left”, or “Right”. You is the person being pointed at. Me is the caller. Left is (from the perspective of the circle) the person to the left of the person being pointed at. Right is to the right. The person has a couple of seconds to say the appropriate person’s name. If not, they become the Caller. The Caller can begin pointing immediately. The person can also call “switch,” once during their turn and the group circle must find new people to stand next to. You can add multiple Callers as people learn names.
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  16. 16. 9 ICEBREAKERS: GET TO KNOW YOU These activities are to help newly formed groups get to know a little about each other and work toward breaking down initial barriers to become more comfortable with one another. M&M OR SKITTLE GAME Time: 20 min Equipment: M&M’s, Skittles, or another similar candy Objective: Providing opportunity for the members of your group to begin to feel comfortable with each other. Directions: Have each person take as many Skittles or M & M’s as they want, before you describe the game, but tell them not to eat them. The twist is that they then need to tell a fact about themselves for each candy piece they took out, based on the colors they chose. Assign a question to each color. If they have multiples of any color, they must then give that number of answers to that color’s question. EX: red= something interesting about your family, blue= hobbies, green = a place you’ve always wanted to go, etc. Be creative! ONCE UPON A TIME – AKA WHERE THE WILD WIND BLOWS Time: 15 minutes Equipment: None Objective: Group bonding and to learn a bit about other group members. Directions: An affirmative version of “never have I ever”. The person has to say something they HAVE done. Here is how it works: have the group stand in a circle. Everyone should remove their shoes (they act as a place holder – alternatively, can use a sturdy water bottle). A Caller starts in the middle of circle (your shoes should not be included as a placeholder in the circle). Using the name of the game, the Caller says something that is true about themselves or that they have done and that they think is also true of some other members of the group. EX: “Once upon a time, I went to Egypt.” “The Wild Wind Blows for people who love apple pie.” “Once upon a time, I broke my arm.” “The Wild Wind Blows for people who have been to Yellowstone.” Etc. Then everyone to whom that ALSO applies has to run and find a new placeholder in the circle to stand by that is not right next to where they were just standing. The person left without a placeholder is now in the middle and they get to proclaim something.
  17. 17. 10 PARTNER INTRODUCTIONS Time: 20 min Equipment: None Objective: Learning about the other members of the group while making personal connections. Directions: Partner up – preferably with someone they’re not too familiar with. Decide as a group five introduction questions. Give each pair several minutes to walk around or find a space to sit and ask each other those questions. Each pair will then introduce each other to the rest of the group. EX: Name? Dogs or cats? Feelings about clowns? If you could fill Lake Tahoe with anything OTHER than water, what would you fill it with? Etc. QUESTIONS Time: 10 min Equipment: Question card for each person Objective: Mingle with the group and learn a bit more about each person. Directions: Each person receives a card with a question on it (you may have the students write questions on cards beforehand, and then use those). They must find a partner and ask that question. That person responds to the question and then asks the question on their card. Once both people have asked and answered each other’s questions then they SWITCH cards and find a new partner. It works best if when searching for new partners, the people looking for a partner raise their question high into the air. TRI-QUESTION WALKABOUT Time: 15 min Equipment: None Objective: Gives members of the group a chance to get to know someone outside their comfort circle on a deeper level. Directions: Pair everyone up, or ask them to find a partner they feel they don’t know much about. The partners should link arms and take a stroll in the nearby vicinity. Each must alternate asking the other three questions – they do not have to ask the same questions. After several minutes, come back together as a group and have them each share something they learned about the other.
  18. 18. 11 THE BUS – AKA EITHER/OR Time: 20 - 30 minutes Equipment: Prepared questions – or can make them up as you go along Objective: Group bonding and learning. Directions: Make or draw a line on the ground that is the proverbial “middle of the bus”. Ask the group questions (the best type of questions are either/or questions). Then each individual person should move to one side of the bus (aka the line) or the other to answer the question. People may also naturally creep closer to the line or farther away to one side depending on their beliefs. You should mix silly questions with serious questions. Try to avoid any questions that might be sensitive or create an atmosphere of judging. EX: City or Country? Vivid dreams or sleep like a log? Book or Movie? Scrunch or fold TP? Give Up or Struggle? Words or numbers? Unknown illness or known illness? Cup or Cone? Know the past perfectly or know the future? Left or right handed? Etc. 2 TRUTHS & A LIE Time: 20 min Equipment: None Objective: Learning about the other members of the group in a fun and silly way. Directions: Everyone takes a few minutes to think of three “facts” about themselves, only two of which are true, but all sound equally plausible/implausible. Each person takes a turn listing all three facts, and the group decides which is a lie.
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  20. 20. 13 GROUP: PROBLEM SOLVING These activities are designed to get groups to work together to solve a common goal. The debriefs aim to get participants to consciously consider how they solved the problem, so they can recognize and repeat successful methods on their own. One of the best ways to debrief is to simply ask them why they did that activity, what they learned (about themselves, others, life, etc.), and if/how they would do it differently next time. DIMINISHING LOAD Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively interact and cooperate with each other to solve a problem that often has more than one correct approach. Directions: Instruct the group that they are to get across an open field as quickly as possible. To get across a person must be carried. The first person must return to be carried across, if someone being carried across touches the ground, both must return to be carried across. Debrief: a) What was your strategy for accomplishing this task? b) How did a leader emerge, and why or why not? c) Was anything frustrating, and how did you deal with those frustrations? d) What was the point of this task? e) What have you learned from this activity? HELIUM POLES Time: 10-15 min Equipment: Tent pole or long stick – something long and should be lightweight Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively interact and cooperate with each other to solve a problem. Directions: Each member of the group holds up the pole/stick with ONE finger (pointer finger) from each hand, so each person only has two fingers on the pole. Without speaking, they must lower the pole to the ground without dropping it, and without anyone’s finger losing contact with the pole.
  21. 21. 14 Debrief: a) Did you find this task easy or difficult? b) What did you have to think about before you started? c) How did you deal with your feelings when it wasn’t working? d) What specific challenges did you come across not being able to speak? How did you overcome those challenges? IN THE LOOP Time: 20-25 min Equipment: 10 lengths of rope or string (5 of varying color/5 of the same color) Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively interact and cooperate with each other to solve a problem that often has more than one correct approach. Directions: A series of four independent rope rings are held together by a fifth rope. The challenge is for a group to decide as a whole, which rope is holding together all the other rope loops, without touching any of the ropes. This activity is done in two rounds. The first round is played with five ropes of different colors. The second round is played with five ropes of the same color. The ropes are laid out ahead of time so that participants do not watch the ropes being handled. Before the first round, give them 1-2 minutes of silent observation before they begin the discussion process. When they have agreed on what they think is the correct rope, have them lift it up to see if they are correct. Before they lift up the ropes, facilitate the conversation a bit by asking what they would bet that they are correct. See how much doubt/consensus there is within the group. If the loop they lift has all four other ropes looped through it, they are correct. If there are three or less loops, they are incorrect. Debrief: Initial Questions a) Did you find this activity easy or difficult? b) Were you able to judge for yourself which rope was holding the others together, or did you rely on group members to show you? c) Did you experience any frustration? Consensus Questions **helpful as an overall discussion for many group activities** a) What is consensus? b) How did you know you had achieved it? How did you demonstrate it behaviorally?
  22. 22. 15 c) Did you really have consensus or something else? (anarchy, majority, implied agreement, agreement by lack of conflict/disagreement) d) If you don’t understand or have an idea to contribute, is it acceptable to just “go along” with what the group thinks? e) How do you know someone is still engaged and participating even when they have no ideas to offer? f) Is compliance the same as consensus? g) Have you ever assumed that consensus existed only to find a lack of input at a critical point? What was lacking that prevented true consensus from occurring? Secondary Debrief a) After a second round, have participants compare the two rounds. b) How was it different? How did they improve? c) What is the value of everyone knowing if true consensus exists and can work to achieve it? MATCH MY CARD Time: 30-40 min Equipment: 3 decks of cards (or as many decks as there are teams, plus one) Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively interact and cooperate with each other to solve a problem that often has more than one correct approach. Directions: Divide groups into two or more teams. On the side, arrange 7-12 cards face up, in a particular configuration (it can be anything as long as it’s repeatable). Each team gets their own deck of cards. The goal is to replicate the exact configuration and cards as what the staff have lain down. However, to do this, each member of each team only gets to look at the cards ONCE for 30 seconds (no writing things down or taking pictures) to try and arrange their cards in the same way. Debrief: a) How did you decide to solve the problem? b) Did you create a strategy? How did you come up with that strategy? c) What challenges did you encounter? How did you deal with those challenges? TRAFFIC JAM Time: 15-20 min Equipment: Objects/squares to be used as place markers
  23. 23. 16 Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively interact and cooperate with each other to solve a problem that often has more than one correct approach. Directions: The goal is to have people on the left half move to the right half, and those on the right half move to the left half. Place objects/squares in an arc on the ground. There should be one more square than there are team members. Have each person stand on a square, leaving the center square empty. Everyone should face towards the empty square. The rules of movement to accomplish your goal are as follows: 1) Only one person may stand on a square at any time. 2) Only one person may move at a time, that person must move from one square to a free square. 3) You may only move onto an empty square directly in front of you or around someone facing you and onto the empty square directly behind that person. 4) No backwards moves are permitted. 5) Squares may not be moved. After they successfully complete it once, have them do it again. Then, have the facilitator step in for one of the students and have that student direct the group to a successful solution without any input from or interaction with the group. This challenges them to really consider whether or not they understand the process or are just following along. Debrief: a) Did everyone see the solution, or did you solve it using collective wisdom? b) Did everyone understand each action’s benefit? If not, how did you know to go ahead and do it? How did you figure out which actions worked and which did not? c) Did you listen to each other? What made you stop listening or check out? Common reasons that will lead people to check out or stop contributing: i. Lack of rediscovering ideas – the solution was stated but not heard. ii. A critical rule was stated early on, and no one in the team even knew that it had been said. iii. Ideas weren’t followed to their conclusion, and rather abandoned part way through. iv. Difficulty turning over something to someone else, allowing collective wisdom to take its course. d) If you didn’t understand the action or solution, did you ask for clarification? Why or why not? e) When explaining a solution, if someone didn’t understand your explanation, what/how did you change the explanation to help them understand?
  24. 24. 17 ZEN COUNTING Time: 10-15 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively interact and cooperate with each other to solve a problem that involves patience and trust. Directions: Everyone stands in a circle and faces out, or lies on the ground with feet in the center and heads to the outside (or vice versa). The goal is to count up to a given number with each person only saying one number at a time, and no two people saying the same number. Other than speaking a number in order, they cannot speak to each other (i.e. no strategizing – it’s best if they also can’t look at each other or touch each other). If a number is said twice, then counting begins again at 1. You can also increase the number if they get it too easily. Debrief: a) Did you experience frustration? How did you deal with those feelings? b) How did you eventually succeed? Did you have a specific strategy? c) What is the purpose of this exercise?
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  26. 26. 19 GROUP: COMMUNICATION These activities aim to increase the amount and ease of communication among group members. Debrief of the activities should help to highlight successful strategies and encourage thoughtful reflection on the way participants communicate with others. BALL COLLECTORS Time: 10-15 min Equipment: Hoops or circles of rope, and many balls/objects Objective: Learning to look for opportunities to work together to achieve a common goal, despite your first instinct. Directions: Each person gets a hoop or circle of rope, and a partner. In a common space, are all of the objects up for grabs. The goal is to get the most balls in your and your partner’s hoops – GO! This game becomes a bit of pandemonium, but hopefully the partners realize they can help each other by piling their hoops together, and combining their ball-collecting efforts. Try to let them find this solution on their own though, without any prodding or leading from the facilitator. You can also add part way through to pick another set of partners and team up with them too and see what happens. Ideally, you’re hoping they realize they can all win if they all pile their hoops together and put all the balls in the middle. Debrief: a) What was your strategy at the beginning? Did that strategy change at all throughout the game? b) Who won? Why? Was their strategy different? c) How would you change your strategy next time? BARN YARD Time: 10-15 min Equipment: Blindfolds Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively communicate with each other in order to complete activity. Directions: Spread everyone out across a pretty large area (like a big field). Instruct the group to blindfold themselves. When everyone is blindfolded, go around and whisper an animal name into each person’s ear. When you’ve told everyone an animal, tell them that ONLY by making the animal noise, they have to arrange themselves in alphabetical order based on the first letter of the animal’s name. I.e. the person who is
  27. 27. 20 the goose walks around honking and must place themselves in the “g” position in the alphabetical order without making any noise other than honking. Debrief: a) Did anyone become the leader? Why or why not? b) How did you know where to fit into the line? c) What were your struggles? How did you mitigate them? BLIND BIRTHDAY GAME Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Blindfolds (optional) Objective: FUN!! Directions: Everyone must get in the order of their birthdays without talking and while keeping their eyes closed. Debrief: a) How did you communicate? b) How did you know where to fit into the line? BODY ENGLISH Time: 25-30 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively communicate with each other in order to complete activity. Directions: Students are first separated into two groups. The goal is for each group to configure their bodies to physically shape the letters of a word to communicate a message to the other group. Groups should stand at least 100 feet apart. Either the instructors or the students can develop messages to convey to the other group. An example would be, “stand on one foot and sing Jingle Bells.” The most important factor is that the techniques used to convey message are effective. Debrief: a) What was the purpose of this activity? b) What things are involved in teamwork? c) How did you decide what to do?
  28. 28. 21 IMPULSE – AKA ELECTRICITY Time: 20 - 30 minutes Equipment: Coin and object to grab Objective: Fun and demonstrates the importance of non-verbal communication. Directions: Everyone grabs a partner and then separates into two shoulder to shoulder single-file lines with partners facing each other). E.g. X Everyone then sits down facing their partner. At the end of the line, place an object at an arm’s reach between the two people seated there (X on the diagram above). Have everyone grab the hands of the people sitting next to them. The purpose of this game is to pass a squeeze from the head of the line to the end. At the head of the line you will set up the coin toss. Heads = squeeze and Tails = do nothing. The facilitator will flip the coin and the two people at the top of the line will squeeze or not squeeze depending on the luck of the flip. If the coin lands Heads, the squeeze should be passed down the line. If the coin lands Tails, they should not squeeze the person’s hand. When the person on the end by the object feels the squeeze, they grab the object. The person who has possession of the object will then rotate to the head of the line so they are now watching the coin and there is a new person grabbing the object. Once the entire group has rotated through, they win! If someone grabs the object and the coin was NOT Heads, then that group must rotate in reverse. Practice with your eyes open one time. Then, everyone except the two people closest to the coin toss closes their eyes. No talking anyone. Go team go! Debrief: a) What made your line go slower? Faster? b) Did you ever get frustrated? How did you deal with that? c) How do you think this game would change if everyone could have their eyes open? If everyone could talk? Would that make it better or worse? JANE’S ANGRY APES – AKA TANK TAG Time: 30-35 min Equipment: Blindfolds and soft objects to throw Objective: Communication!! Directions: Divide into pairs. One person in the pair is Jane (Goodall, of course), and the other is her Ape (obviously a chimpanzee). The Ape is blindfolded. Soft objects are distributed around a defined playing space. The blindfolded Apes crawl on all fours around the playing space, trying to pick up a soft object and throw it another Ape, guided in this process by their Jane. When an Ape has been struck three times by an
  29. 29. 22 object, they are out. Play until there is only one Ape left. Debrief, then switch the Jane/Ape rolls and play again. Debrief: a) Jane, how did you communicate with your Ape? b) Ape, did you have any difficulty receiving Jane’s communication? What helped? c) What was the hardest part? PERFECT SQUARE Time: 10-15 min Equipment: Blindfolds and a long piece of rope with the ends tied together Objective: A communication challenge. Directions: Blindfold everyone and have them stand in a circle holding the piece of rope. Everyone should then set the rope on the ground and take a short walk away from the rope. Everyone then needs to come back to the rope, and form it into a square. For the first round, allow students to talk to each other. Debrief and repeat a second round with no talking allowed. Debrief: a) How did you figure out how to make a square the first time? b) How did you communicate when you couldn’t talk? c) How did you know when you had succeeded? SEARCH & RESCUE – AKA BLIND RETRIEVER Time: 20 min Equipment: Blindfolds and one object for each team Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively communicate with each other in order to complete activity. Directions: Divide everyone into groups of three. One person in each group is the Retriever who is blindfolded and stands on the starting line. One person in each group is the Speaker and stands with his/her back to the blindfolded Retriever and faces away from the playing field. The Speaker is not allowed to look at the playing field at any time. The other player in the group is the Director and stands in front of the Speaker, facing the playing field. The Director is not allowed to talk or make any noise at any time. S/he is allowed to look at the playing field and must stand where the Speaker can see them without looking at the playing field. The Director is allowed to use hand and body gestures. Once everyone is in place, the facilitator places the
  30. 30. 23 object for each team an equal distance from each team’s Retriever. On “go”, the Directors give visual directions to the Speaker who verbalizes those directions to the blindfolded Retriever who walks out and gets the object. The group is successful when they direct the Retriever back to the start and have him/her place the object in the Speaker’s hands. After each group has returned their object back to the Speaker, debrief have everyone switch roles and go again, so each person gets a chance in each role. Debrief: a) Speaker, what were your challenges and how did you overcome them? b) Retriever, what were your challenges and how did you overcome them? c) Director, what were your challenges and how did you overcome them? d) What hindered you from working together? What helped you work together? SKIN THE SNAKE Time: 5 – 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Warm up and feel comfortable with other members of the group. Directions: Everyone stand in a line, single file facing the same direction. Leave about an arm’s length between each person. Instruct everyone to put their left hand between their legs. Then with their right hand, reach forward and grab the person’s left hand directly in front of them. This should form a chain. Now starting at the back of the line, the group needs to “skin the snake” or untangle the chain without letting go of anyone’s hands. You can choose to direct them in how this should happen, or simply let them figure it out themselves. Essentially, each person must crawl through the legs of the person in front of them. You might recommend that the person crawling between someone’s legs politely say hello – it’s a nice thing to do. Debrief: a) What was the point of this activity? b) How did you feel going into this activity, while it was being described? How did you feel during this activity? c) How did communication help this activity? d) Did completing this task change your feelings about it if we decided to do it again?
  31. 31. 24 SLIPPED DISC Time: 10-15 min Equipment: Frisbee Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to effectively communicate with each other in order to complete the activity. Directions: Everyone forms a circle on hands and knees with heads facing inward. A Frisbee is placed in the middle of one person’s back. The object of the game is to pass the Frisbee around the circle, from back to back, without using hands. If the Frisbee falls, it is picked up by hand and placed on the back of the last person who had it. The game continues until the Frisbee is passed successfully around the entire circle. Debrief: a) What was the purpose of this activity? b) What made the activity go well or not? c) What things involved communication? d) How did you decide on the technique used? TELEPHONE Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Communication!! Directions: Form a line or a circle and the first player whispers a statement or story into the ear of the next player. Pass it down ear to ear and the last player announces it out loud. It can be silly, or it can be a piece of actual, important information to demonstrate the changes that can take place in information the farther it is from the source. Debrief: a) How different were the beginning and ending messages? How did they get so different or stay so similar? b) How does this relate to real life? (It shows the importance of source proximity, by how garbled a message can become the farther from the source it gets – think research to news media or original interview to hearsay. This illustrates the importance of choosing the right sources for your information in research, news, and advice!) c) How can you help avoid this downward slide in information exchange (both game and real life)?
  32. 32. 25 TINY LITTLE TEASPOONS Time: 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Communication. Directions: Divide into two groups. Each group picks a specific type of store that they would like to be. EX: hardware store, grocery, secondhand – the more creative the better. Then each person in that group chooses an item they will to be in that store. Next the two groups line-up facing each other with about 15-20 feet in between. Then they will go through a series of actions, while trying to figure out the type of store the other team is: 1) On command, everyone in both groups, WHISPER their item at the same time. Ask if anyone knows what kind of store the other group is? (Don’t confirm) 2) Then on command, everyone SCREAM their item at the same time. Ask if anyone knows what kind of store the other group is now? (Don’t confirm) 3) Then on command, everyone SPEAKS NORMALLY their item at the same time. Ask if anyone knows what kind of store the other group is now? (Don’t confirm) 4) Finally, the groups start with each person saying their item individually. Then the other group. Now can they figure out the type of store the other team is? Debrief: a) What was the point of this game?
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  34. 34. 27 GROUP: TRUST These activities are designed to help group members trust each other, and to create a safe space to voice and overcome reservations, fears and concerns. Any debrief should focus on how the experience was for students, so they can feel safe voicing their feelings to each other and gain insight from seeing how other group members felt about the experience. BODY SNATCHERS Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Blindfolds Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to entrust their physical and emotional well-being to others. Directions: The objective is to avoid being snatched by the Body Snatcher. Choose one player as the evil invader from outer space and the rest go around blindfolded. The invading Body Snatcher gets to keep their eyes open. They creep up to an unsuspecting Citizen and make whatever scary, blood-curdling sound they want (don’t make anyone deaf!) then that person also becomes a Body Snatcher. The last one left gets to be the new Body Snatcher. COME TO ME Time: 10-15 min Equipment: Blindfolds Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to entrust their physical and emotional well-being to others. Directions: Divide the group into pairs. One person in each pair will then be blindfolded while the other remains sighted. Instruct everyone to scatter evenly across a large area. The sighted person then attempts to approach the blindfolded person from an agreed distance and tap them on the shoulder before being detected. When the game is initiated, the blindfolded partner calls, “come to me” to their partner. The sighted partner has one minute to stealthily approach. If the blind person believes they can hear their partner approaching they yell, “get outta here!” They are limited to three attempts to reveal their partner’s location.
  35. 35. 28 DON’T LAUGH AT ME – AKA THE HA GAME Time: 10-15 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to entrust their physical and emotional well-being to others. Directions: Start with one person lying on the ground, facing the sky. Have another person lie down at an angle, placing his/her head on the first person’s stomach. Their bodies should form a T shape. Have a third person lie down at an angle to the second person and so on until everyone is in connected in a circle/blob shape. Instruct the first person in the configuration to call out “HA,” as if laughing, but without actually laughing. Immediately after, the second person, who has his/her head on the first person’s stomach, should call out “HA HA,” the third “HA HA HA,” and so on until someone actually laughs. The effort required from one’s diaphragm to issue a “HA” will cause the head of the person lying on it to bounce. The goal is to SAY “HA”, and not laugh. If someone laughs, then you start over, with the person who laughed going first. TRUST LEAD Time: 5-30 minutes Equipment: Blindfolds Objective: Providing an opportunity for group members to entrust their physical well- being to others. Directions: Pick a partner and pass out one blindfold to each pair. One person is blindfolded and their partner is in charge of leading them around on a trust walk. They can be free to create their own route or they can play follow-the-facilitator. To finish it off, it is great to pick a safe area where the blindfolded person can try to go on a supervised “free run.” Then switch the blindfold. WIND IN THE WILLOWS Time: 25-30 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to entrust their physical and emotional well-being to others. Directions: Standing in the middle of a circle of spotters, a person will close his/her eyes and lean in all directions to be passed back and forth among the group. Instruct the faller to pivot from the ankles when leaning and to keep the rest of their body as
  36. 36. 29 stiff and straight as possible. Caution the group to pass the individual and not throw him or her! Make sure all group members get a chance to participate in the middle of the circle. Debrief: a) What was experience in the middle of the circle like? b) What emotions did you experience? c) How easy was it to submit to the group?
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  38. 38. 31 GROUP: TEAM BUILDING These activities are designed to incorporate elements of problem-solving, communication and trust to help your group become a cohesive, functioning unit. Any debrief should help them to resolve differences and become better at working together. CHOCOLATE RIVER Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Cardboard squares, or their equivalent (8-9), and river boundaries Objective: Problem solving, communication, and team building. Directions: Lay two ropes on the ground horizontally (like ===), or set two distinct boundaries, with about seven giant steps (15-20 feet) in between. Have everyone line up on one side behind the boundary. Between the two ropes/or boundaries is the Chocolate River (or you can make it Lava, Acid, a Deep Dark Pit, etc.). The goal is get the entire team across the hot Chocolate River, but it is too hot to swim across and too deep to walk across. If anyone touches the Chocolate River the whole team must start over. The only way to get across is by using the large, fluffy Marshmallows that you provide. (You can use pieces of paper, bark, or leaves – work with what you’ve got. You should have about 8-9 pieces.) Unfortunately, the current in the river is so strong that it actually sweeps the Marshmallows away if someone is not always touching them with a hand, foot, or other safe appendage. Also the Marshmallows can only hold a certain amount of weight. This is determined only by the number of feet placed on the marshmallow. 0 = it floats away, 1 =good, 2=good, 3=the Marshmallow sinks and is lost. This seems like a simple exercise, but some groups have a lot of trouble with it. Watch the Marshmallows, if there is not some appendage touching it at ALL times grab it and throw it away. If you feel like reducing the challenge level on the group you can reward them by returning Marshmallows for good communication or anything else you notice. DIMINISHING CIRCLES – AKA SHRINKING SHIP Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Rope Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to create and build group cohesion in order to overcome demanding requirements of the trip.
  39. 39. 32 Directions: Create a large circle with the rope. The objective is for the group to get everyone inside the circle. When beginning, make the perimeter of the circle large enough to guarantee success. Once they have experienced success from the first round, make the circle smaller and smaller, until the group can barely succeed. Skip the debrief for this activity, instead point out the “take away” lesson – that everyone is going to have to come together on this trip and sometimes things might get uncomfortable, sometimes things might be challenging, and only if the whole group is reaching out and working together will it be a success. HUMAN KNOT Time: 5-10 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to create and build group cohesion in order to overcome demanding requirements of program. Directions: The task in this game is to form a knot by holding hands in a group and then untie it. Form the knot by standing in a circle, shoulder-to-shoulder, and placing everyone’s hands in the center. Now everybody grab a couple of hands. Do not hold hands of the person standing next to you or the same hands of one person. Now untie it. As a facilitator, try to have as little input as possible and let them figure it out and debrief what they thought of it themselves. POPSICLE PUSH UPS Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to create and build group cohesion and become more physically comfortable with each other. Directions: The goal of this game is to get your entire group supported off the ground with only the participants’ hands touching the ground. Don’t share with the students, but the idea is that the second person lies face down, behind the first person so that the tops of his/her feet are on top of the first person’s back or shoulders. Each person does the same. Everyone either starts with their arms extended or at the end does a push up together. REACH FOR YOUR GOALS Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Note cards and pens Objective: Work together to achieve personal and group goals.
  40. 40. 33 Directions: Have the group write down a few goals for the program on a note card. While they are writing, make a small circle on the ground out of rope, or find a small area in which the whole group can fit, with defined boundaries. Collect note cards and band them together. Then set up your narrative. EX: “We’re going on a magical adventure. Everyone, let’s pile into the “spaceship” (the rope circle on the ground or area you chose).” Everyone needs to be completely inside. It should be a small enough space to be challenging but not too difficult. One everyone is inside the space, explain that on this adventure the group needs to “reach their goals” (you can also call them something else – like rocket fuel that they need to reach their destination). Place their goals far away (depends on group size). Explain to the group that the current or wind or some such force will whisk people away if they are not connected to the space ship. If there is a break in contact, the adventure starts over. The mission is to reach the goals. You can move the goals multiple times until finally just barely within reach by everyone laying down fully extended working together. Alternative to make things even more challenging: Put the goals so far from the group that the only way for them to reach them is to ask the facilitator(s) to join their efforts. This shows them that you are a part of the group too, and helps them feel comfortable asking you for help. This is a great activity to simply ask the group why you had them do that activity. (You all need to work together on this trip – no one can do it alone.)
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  42. 42. 35 JUST FOR FUN: TIRE THEM OUT These games are exactly what they sound like. Great for groups with high energy that need a productive outlet. ALASKAN BASEBALL Time: 20-25 min Equipment: A ball, or object to throw Objective: FUN!! Directions: Divide into two teams and set up a baseball diamond. One team lines up at home plate and the other spreads out throughout the field. The first batter is “up” and takes the ball/object and throws it somewhere in the field. The batter, followed by his/her entire team, then travels around all the bases (the next person in line can begin once the player in front of them has reached first base) while the outfielders run to get the ball. The outfielder who gets the ball first stops there and the rest of the outfield team lines up behind them. They then must pass the ball alternately over heads and under legs until it reaches the last person in the outfielder line (must have the whole team there before you can begin). As soon as the ball has reached the end, the outfield team sits down and yells “STOP!” The batting team must stop and count their score (1 for every person who crosses home plate). Continue until every batter has had a chance to bat, and then switch field positions. Alternative, if there’s not enough space: Rather than creating bases and running around them, have the batting team stand in a circle. Whoever is batting (rather than rounding the bases), runs around the outside of their team’s circle, and taps each person while saying their name. The team gets a point for every time the batter makes it around the naming circle. BIRDIE ON A PERCH Time: 10 minutes Equipment: None Objective: Be silly, break down physical barriers. Directions: Ask for participants to find a partner. They will then create two circles, one person from each pair in the inner circle and one in the outer circle. The facilitator will ask each circle to rotate in opposite directions while everyone sings the Birdie on a Perch song (there is an “official” song, but you can use any song by simply removing the words and singing with cheer!). When the facilitator shouts, “Birdie on a perch!”
  43. 43. 36 the two members of each pair must find each other and hop on the other person’s back (like a piggy back). The last pair to do this is out of that round. The game continues until only one pair remains. This is a good option because it allows students to feel more comfortable within each other’s space, and allows them to be less inhibited. This is not a great option for forming groups or introductions as it makes people a bit uncomfortable when they hardly know one another. Depending on the maturity of your group, you may also consider same-sex partners. JOHNNY JOHNNY Time: 15-20 min Equipment: None Objective: Lots of running and getting tired out, also a potential to learn about each other, depending on what Johnny says. Directions: Set up a playing field with well-defined boundaries and two safe zones on opposite ends of the playing field. One person is Johnny and stands in the middle while all others start all in one safe zone. The group in the safe zone is trying to cross to the other safe zone without being tagged by Johnny. The group yells (together!) “Johnny, Johnny, may we cross your wide, wide river?” to which Johnny responds, “only if _______ (ex: you’re wearing purple, your birthday is in June, you have a brother, etc.). If what Johnny said applies to you, then you have to try to cross the river without being tagged. If you are tagged by Johnny, then you join Johnny in the middle and help tag people trying to cross the river. Keep playing until no one is left in the starting safe zone and then switch to crossing back from the ending safe zone to the beginning one. The last person to be caught becomes the next Johnny. MAN HUNT Time: 15-20 min Equipment: None Objective: FUN!! Directions: This game is a cross between hide-and-seek and tag. Be sure to set physical boundaries to your playing field before you begin. One person is It. They stand in one spot, and count loudly to 60 while the rest of the group hides. The It person then searches for the hiding group members. If you are spotted, you can run away from the It person. Once you are found and tagged, you join the man hunt for the rest of the group members until everyone is found.
  44. 44. 37 THE TAIL THAT WAGS THE DOG Time: 5-10 min Equipment: An object to use as a tail Objective: Silliness! Directions: A group of people stand in line with their hands on the hips/waist/shoulders (depending on personal comfort levels) of the person in front of them. The person in the back has a tail on. The head tries to get the tail without breaking the chain.
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  46. 46. 39 JUST FOR FUN: WAKE THEM UP These activities are short and silly – a great way to re-energize groups, break up an especially wordy lesson, or just add a moment of silliness to an otherwise serious activity. ELBOW TAG Time: 5 - 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Warm up and get energized. Directions: Everyone grab a partner. You need an even number of people to play this game, so if you have an odd number of people then the facilitator becomes a part of the game. This game is simply tag, but there is only one eligible person to tag. Partners lock arms and spread themselves out randomly in a field. One person is free to run and is trying to be tagged by another person. To prevent being tagged, the free person must run up to a pair and lock arms with one of them. Once the free person locks arms with the pair, there are three people locked together, which is not allowed, so the person not directly touching the newest addition is now the one being chased. When someone is tagged then their roles are reversed and they become the tagger. METAMORPHOSIS Time: 5 - 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Warm up while being silly. Directions: A wacked out version of rock-paper-scissors where students act out different phases of being as they win or lose. Students start in a beginning phase (acting out being an egg, larva, or some other variation) and play Rock Paper Scissors with one person at a time. When a person wins, then they progress to the next stage (being a chick or pupa, etc.) and the loser reverts to the previous stage. Eventually people get to the top of the food chain (yay!), though they may not stay there. It is a silly game people are winning and losing and acting like fools. Play ad nauseam. (Discuss beforehand: Rock, Paper, Scissors, then shoot) EX: egg  caterpillar  chicken  T rex  superman
  47. 47. 40 PASS THE LOOP Time: 5 – 10 min Equipment: Hula hoop (easier) or rope (harder) Objective: Warm up and teamwork. Directions: Everyone stands in a circle and joins hands with the people on either side. The hula hoop is placed so that one pair of people is joining hands through the middle of it. The goal of this game is to pass the hoop around the circle while the group remains holding hands. Alternative: Use two loops going opposite directions, time the group, or tie two loops together (to make a figure-eight) and have the loops go opposite directions. PEOPLE 2 PEOPLE Time: 5 - 10 min Equipment: None Objective: Warm up. Directions: Everyone grabs a partner. This game is a cross between Simon Says and two person yoga. Facilitator will call out a body part and each pair then has to connect to each other using that body part. EX: “Elbow to elbow.” If the facilitator says “Velcro” then the buddy pair must continue to hold those two body parts together. If the facilitator does not say “Velcro” then pairs are free to move into the next configuration however they choose. When the facilitator says, “people to people,” everyone needs to find a new partner. ROCK STAR Time: 2 min Equipment: None Objective: Warm up in a silly way and take a break from reality. Directions: This is best to set up as a narrative. EX: “Everyone, you are in a rock band – visualize the band, become that persona. You are now all Rock Stars and you are sooooo popular. You are too popular and you need some help. Now silently (in your head only) pick two people in the group. One person is going to be the Paparazzi that you can’t stand. The other person is your Bodyguard. Does everyone have a Bodyguard and a Paparazzi? Your job as the Rock Star is to always keep your Bodyguard between you and the Paparazzi. On your mark, get set, go!” Don’t give
  48. 48. 41 them time to ask questions. This is a silly game and they just run around for a little bit. Once the game seems to stabilize (a minute or so) then call it. SCREAMING TOES Time: 5 min Equipment: None Objective: Warm up. Directions: Everyone stands in a close circle, shoulder to shoulder and looks down and finds someone else’s feet to stare at. On the count of three, look up into the eyes of the person who’s feet you were staring at. If you find yourself making eye contact with another person, you both scream, and run around to a different spot in the circle. Repeat until laughter ensues.
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  50. 50. 43 JUST FOR FUN: SITTING DOWN These games are great for having fun without running around – helpful if your group is tired or if you’re trying to push them toward turning in for the night. Or if the weather is yucky and you’re stuck indoors. ASSASSIN – AKA FROGGER Time: 20-25 min (5-10 min per round) Equipment: None Objective: Silly, mild fun. Directions: All students are Flies on a Fly Farm! One person is the Farmer, who gets to try to figure out which of the Flies is really the Frog. The goal of this game is for the Frog to eat all the Flies by sticking out his/her tongue at them, while avoiding being caught by the Farmer. While the Farmer hides his/her eyes and everyone in the circle closes their eyes, one person (facilitator, or last round’s Farmer) walks around the circle and taps one person on the head. That person is the Frog. Everyone opens their eyes and the Farmer comes back to stand in the middle of the circle to try to figure out who the Frog is. When the Frog sticks his/her tongue out at a Fly, that Fly must “die” and lay down, out of the game (no giving the Frog away!). The Farmer gets three guesses to figure out who the Frog is. If the Farmer cannot figure out who the Frog is before the Frog kills all the Flies, then the Frog wins. DRAWING IN THE DARK Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Creative fun. Directions: This game must be played in a totally dark place (at night, in a cave, etc.). The goal is for each student draw a picture illustrating a story told by one of the other players without being able to see their paper. Someone must volunteer to be the storyteller. Remind them to keep the story absolutely clean. It doesn’t have to be long or elaborate, but it should include a number of different figures and objects which will be drawn by the other players. The story should be fairly short and after each sentence or two, the players should be given a moment or two to draw. When the story and drawings are complete, turn some lights on. The illustration that comes the closest to the story described, as determined either by the storyteller or a vote, is the winner.
  51. 51. 44 HONEY, IF YOU LOVE ME, PLEASE SMILE Time: 15-20 min Equipment: None Objective: Silly fun. Directions: One person walks around saying this line to other members of the group in any way they want, to try to get the others to smile. If someone cracks, that person is now in the middle trying to do the same thing to someone else. MAFIA Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Creative mystery fun. Directions: This one is complicated to describe and there are tons of variations. Here is one way to play that will help minimize the bickering, debate and complications. Usually there is an All-Knowing figure (facilitator or a story-telling student) who chooses the characters and then narrates: two Mafia (who murder), one Angel (who saves) and the rest of the people are Townspeople (who guess). The All-Knowing has everyone close their eyes, walks around the circle and gives one tap to the head for Mafia members, and two to the Angel. They then wake up the Mafia, has them silently select someone to murder and then go back to sleep. Then the Angel is woken up and s/he silently selects someone to save (the Angel does NOT get to know who the Mafia killed before they select who to save). Then, all are told to wake up and everyone takes on the role of a Townsperson, including the Mafia and Angel. The All-Knowing tells everyone who the Mafia killed, and who the Angel saved. This is a chance to make up a creative story. That dead Townsperson is out for the rest of the game, and cannot give away who is in the Mafia, or who the Angel is, but can join in discussion to have fun with those still alive. Everyone then tries to figure out who the Mafia is. This usually involves a lot of arguing and eventually the group will take a vote on one person who they think is in the Mafia and they will “hang”. Either way, the person they choose will join the dead. Do not confirm or deny if that person was part of the Mafia – they may do so if they so choose. Everyone then goes back to sleep for another round of Mafia killings and Angel savings. Repeat until either both members of the Mafia are dead, or until there are no Townspeople left. Be creative!
  52. 52. 45 MAKING RAIN Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Fun and can be soothing as well – not a lot of brain power required. Directions: Everyone sits in the circle, except for one person, who will be the Detective. With the Detective out of the circle, a Rain Maker is chosen. The Detective comes back to stand into the center of the circle. Everyone starts by doing the same motion – patting your lap with both your hands in sync. The Rain Maker can change the action whenever he/she wants to whatever he/she wants, and everyone must follow suit. It is the job of the Detective to figure out who the Rain Maker is – they get three guesses. STORY-STORY Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Easy entertainment. Directions: Everyone sits side by side in a line. One person is chosen as the Conductor and sits facing the line. The Conductor then asks for something (a place, subject, activity, scene, relationship, etc.) from the group that will provide a loose framework/plot for the story. The Conductor points to the first person who begins the story and continues until the Conductor points to the next person. Enjoy the story! TELEPHONE PICTIONARY Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Full sheets of paper and writing utensils Objective: Silly and creative. Directions: Everyone starts with a blank sheet of paper (roughly the same size!). Decide as a group some sort of category that you will base your Pictionary on (ex: fairy tales, awesome movie ideas, something that happened to you once, etc.). Once decided, everyone writes a single sentence in that theme and passes their paper to the left. The person receiving the paper then reads the sentence and below it, draws a picture to illustrate what the sentence says. They then fold the part of the paper with the original sentence on it backwards, so only the picture they drew is visible. They pass it on to the person to their left. That person looks at the illustration and below it, writes a sentence describing what’s happening in the illustration, then folds the paper back so only their sentence is visible and passes the paper to the left. Continue in this
  53. 53. 46 fashion until there is no more room on the page or you’ve made it around the circle once, whichever you prefer. Then you simply unfold the pages and laugh and laugh and laugh at how silly they ended up! You can vote on your favorite(s) if you’d like, or simply enjoy!
  54. 54. 47 JUST FOR FUN: SILLY These games are a bit off the wall and sometimes kooky. They can be a good creative outlet for your group. ARK, SNARK, BARK Time: 5-10 min Equipment: Blindfolds (optional) Objective: Hilarious and fun to watch and take part in. Directions: Everyone is secretly given a word that ends with –ark, and pairs of people will have the same word. Everyone is then told to walk around blindfolded or with their eyes closed trying to locate the other person who is making the same sound as them. CHARADES Time: 25-30 min Equipment: Paper slips and pencil/pen Objective: Creative and interactive fun. Directions: First, everyone needs to write down several (three to six) famous people, characters, books, movies, etc. on individual slips of paper and put them into a common bowl. The goal in this game is to guess, in the shortest time possible, the clue being acted out by your team members. Two teams compete, and alternate turns acting and guessing. Each actor gets 60 seconds to get through as many clues as they can, until all clues have been guessed. Alternative: You can make this harder by only allowing acting and no words or noises. FINGER FENCING Time: 5 min Equipment: None Objective: Silly fun. Directions: Two people face each other, grab right hand to right hand with thumbs interlocking and pointer finger pointing towards the other person. The goal of this game is to touch the other person with your finger and avoid being touched by your opponent’s finger.
  55. 55. 48 FOX IN THE HEN HOUSE Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Blindfold Objective: Fun and practice using senses other than sight. Directions: One person is blindfolded and sits in the middle of a defined area about 12-15 feet in diameter. Three or four objects are placed around the blindfolded person. Everyone else stands silently on the outside of the circle, and must try to enter the circle to remove the objects placed inside it. If the blindfolded person hears the other participants inside the circle, they point to where they think that person is. If they are correct, that person is out. Play until either all objects have been retrieved or all players are out. Alternative: You can debrief this lesson, or even relate it to a biology or ecology lesson about animals relying on other senses more than sight. GROUP THUMB WAR Time: 5 min Equipment: None Objective: Chaotic fun. Directions: Set up just like Human Knot, where everyone grabs two different people’s hands in a big jumble of limbs. However, grab hands in a way that you can play simultaneous thumb war with two different opponents! Ready, set, chaos! GUESS WHO??? Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Pens and notecards Objective: Fun puzzle game of memory and guessing. Directions: Have each player secretly write down one well-known person that everyone would recognize (fictional or not – i.e. Socrates, Joan of Arc, Angelina Jolie, George Bush, Michael Jordan, Big Bird, etc.). One person collects all the cards and reads through the names out loud, twice. Everyone should try to remember all of the names. Everyone then becomes their own team. One person begins by trying to guess another person’s identity (who they wrote on their piece of paper). It’s just blind guessing – but you have to remember all the names that were read as possibilities. If they get it right, the guessed person joins their team and that team gets to try to guess another person. If they guess wrong, the person they tried to guess gets to try – you
  56. 56. 49 can steal people back and forth between the many different teams! As the teams grow, names will be used up and it will get harder and harder to remember the names left. A team wins when they eliminate the last person whose identity is still un- guessed, or you can play until all people are on one team. HAGOO Time: 15-20 min Equipment: None Objective: Goofy fun! Directions: Two teams face each other, about three feet apart. Two players, one for each team, who stand at the opposite ends of the lines, are challengers. They step forward and face each other down the length of the gauntlet. With a bow and the invitation Hagoo, they walk towards each other, breaking neither their eye contact nor their reserve. In the middle, they pass and continue to the end, determined to suppress their smile. The rest of the players may engage in any form of facial movements or noises but no touching. If you make it the whole length then you stay with your team. If you smile or laugh you join the other team. Play until everyone has done it or there is only one team. IN THE WAY OF THE ADVERB Time: 15-20 min Equipment: None Objective: Comical and creative fun. Directions: Two kids pick an adverb together without letting the rest of the group know. Then the rest of the group has them act out various actions with that adverb, and everyone tries to figure out the adverb they chose. It might be helpful to remind your group what an adverb is (a word that modifies a verb or action), and give them a few examples (excitedly, loudly, ridiculously – most words ending in –ly). KING FROG Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Concentration and memory while being silly and having fun. Directions: Everybody needs to be sitting down in a circle, positioned so that they can see everybody else from where they sit. The leader, who will become the King or Queen Frog, then invites each person to think of a unique action and noise they can
  57. 57. 50 identify with an animal. For example, someone may choose to be a gorilla by beating their pumped-up chest vigorously with their clenched fists, and making gorilla like noises. After a little thinking time, the King or Queen Frog starts off demonstrating their action. The action of the King or Queen Frog is up to that person (but it could be moving one palm quickly across the other – like a frog jumping off of a lily pad). Allow your group the opportunity to repeat the actions before continuing around the circle to learn all of the other actions. Ensure that they are all unique, i.e., you can have three types of birds, as long as they all have distinct gestures. Explain that the King Frog goes first. That person will perform their gesture and noise and then perform the gesture and noise of another animal in the group. This is a signal to this next animal that it is their turn. They must quickly do their action and follow it with the action and noise of another animal, and so on. A slow start will help people get the idea of it, and then the pace will pick up. Here’s where it gets fun: if someone is too slow or mucks up the actions or performs them in the wrong sequence, everything stops. That person is obliged to leave their seat, and sit to the left of the King Frog. This causes everyone sitting to the right of the King Frog to move along one seat to fill the gaps. NOW, the clincher! The animal does not move with the person – the actions belong to the seat. So when a person sits in a new seat, they will assume the actions of the new animal. The object of the game is to get into the royal throne, because then you have control. So, each time the King Frog makes a mistake, everyone moves one seat to the left and closer to the throne. Hooray! MUSEUM Time: 5-10 min Equipment: None Objective: Fun with an opportunity to be creative and silly. Directions: Similar to Red Light, Green Light. One person is the Museum Guard, and everyone else is a Dinosaur in a museum exhibit. The Museum Guard closes his/her eyes and faces away from the group, and all the Dinosaurs come to life. As soon as the Guard turns around, the Dinosaurs freeze. If the Guard spots any movement, that Dinosaur is out. This game is fun to play with headlamps in the dark! NINJA Time: 5-10 min Equipment: None Objective: Fun and excitement.
  58. 58. 51 Directions: The goal of the game is to touch other players’ arms between the elbow and fingertips to eliminate that arm. When both arms are eliminated, that player is out. Everyone stands in a circle and, taking turns, each player gets a single move (aka one bodily movement – a jump/chop, a lunge/slice, a jab, etc.) to try to eliminate another player. An attacked player gets a single move to try and avoid being eliminated. The game begins with everyone’s hands together in the middle – rub them together and scream “NINJA!” while jumping into your best ninja pose. And don’t forget to make crazy ninja noises! PUSH Time: 5 min Equipment: None Objective: Silly fun that starts out calm but with the opportunity to grow. Directions: Two people stand toe-to-toe facing each other. The goal is to push your opponent and cause them to lose their balance and take a step backwards. You can only push against each other’s hands. SMAUG’S JEWELS Time: 10-15 min Equipment: An object to be used as Smaug’s Jewel Objective: Fun competition. Directions: Someone is Smaug and stands in the middle guarding a Jewel. Anyone who tries to get the Jewel and gets tagged by Smaug is frozen. A person who is frozen can be tagged by a non-frozen person to be released. Anyone who gets the Jewel is now Smaug. TRIPLE CHARADES Time: 40-50 min Equipment: None Objective: Creative fun with team comradery. Directions: This works just like charades, but there are three distinct rounds, in which all the same clues are being guessed in each round. Teams take 60 second turns to go through as many clues as can be correctly guessed within that time span. The first round is just like normal charades, where people only talk to describe the clues. Once all clues have been guessed, put them back in the bowl and begin the second round. The second round is acting only – no talking or noise-making. The third round is a
  59. 59. 52 single word! Be careful, because “um” counts as a word, and there’s no acting this round! Feel free to keep score if your group wants a winner, or just play for fun. WARP SPEED Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Fun test of memory, speed and basic coordination. Directions: The group first throws a ball around a circle, remembering who they threw the ball to, until each person in the group has had the ball just once. Then the group starts again to see how fast they can get the ball around the group in the same order. A second and then a third ball are introduced (labeled 1, 2, and 3) and the group needs to get all three balls to each person in the same order and tries to do that as quickly as possible.
  60. 60. 53 JUST FOR FUN: PARLOR GAMES Parlor games are types of riddles that can be solved with concentration and attention to detail (historically played in parlors, hence the name). They’re great to play while you’re waiting for something or during a long leg of travel. These can be quite frustrating though, so know your group! It’s also best not to play too many of these or to play them too much, but rather sprinkle them into your trip together when you see they could use a brain challenge. BANG BANG Time: 25-30 min Equipment: None Objective: Group puzzle. Directions: With everyone sitting in a circle (or standing in an area), “shoot” three people with a finger gun. Say, “Bang, bang, bang – who did I shoot?” The group then tries to figure out who actually got shot! Solution: The first person to talk or make any sort of noise with their mouth (cough, sneeze, say “um”) after you finish is the one that got shot. Alternative: You can also do the same thing with Three Magic Words. Tell them you’re describing someone in the group, and then say three random words. EX: fish, ice cube, toenail. Ask who it is that you were describing, and again, the answer is the first person to makes a noise. BEHIND THE GREEN GLASS DOORS Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Verbal puzzle. Directions: The goal of this word game is to figure out what things belong behind the green glass doors and what do not. You give several examples, and then everyone else gets to try and figure out the secret. You would say, “Behind the green glass doors, there are puppies but no dogs” “…kittens but no cats” “…spoons but no forks”, etc. Guessers use the same phrase to try to figure out the solution. Solution: Objects and things with double letters (spOOn, kiTTens, puPPies) can go behind the grEEn glaSS dOOrs, but objects without double letters cannot. It’s best to
  61. 61. 54 start using examples that sound related to one another (mOOn but no sun, leTTers but no words, yeLLow but no blue, etc.). If the group starts to get very frustrated, you can make them less related and therefore easier to figure out. BLACK MAGIC Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Theatrical puzzle. Directions: This puzzle requires two people to be “in” on the solution. Do not tell the rest of the group that it’s a puzzle, rather frame it as magic, or that that person is psychic and can guess any object we choose. Have the other person who is in on the trick cover their ears or hide where they can’t hear, while the rest of the group picks a visible object nearby. Bring the guesser back to the group. Then you (who is in on the trick) ask the guesser, “Is it _______?” naming various objects nearby. The guesser says “no” to everything. Ask several objects around the group, then right before you are going to ask the CORRECT object, ask the guesser if it is some object that is BLACK in color (hence the name “Black Magic”). The guesser knows that the object after a black colored object is THE object the group chose. Repeat with new objects until someone thinks they have figured it out, and then let them be the guesser to see if they have in fact discovered the magic. BROOM SNIFFING Time: 20-25 min Equipment: A broom, long pole, or stick Objective: Theatrical puzzle. Directions: Just like Black Magic, this trick requires two people to be “in” on the trick, and should be framed as magic or psychic ability, rather than a game/trick. In this trick, the guesser (who is in on the trick) hides his/her eyes and the group picks a “spot” on the broom/pole/stick that is the Magic Spot. The guesser comes back and attempts to find the Magic Spot ONLY by sniffing the broom. The guesser can make this QUITE theatrical! They will know when they are sniffing the right spot, because the person holding the broom (also in on the trick) will tap their foot or move their toes to indicate the correct spot. Voila! It’s magic!
  62. 62. 55 CAN YOU POGO? Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Verbal puzzle. Directions: This is a game in which the group tries to figure out how to “pogo”. Similar to Green Glass Doors, you give several examples of how to pogo, and then they try to pogo and you tell them if they have succeeded or not. You say “Okay, I can pogo off that log, I can pogo off that pine cone, and I can pogo off your head. I can pogo. Can you pogo?” And then they make their attempt. Solution: They must begin their pogo attempt by saying “okay”. Then they can pogo off anything and everything (picking 3 random objects). It’s important to say the entire sequence each time, as it makes it seem like what you’re pogoing off of makes a difference. Only you know they must begin by saying “okay”. If they become frustrated, you can emphasize saying “okay”, or you can cut them off right after they start pogoing if they don’t say “okay”. COUNTING STICKS Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Sticks (can also use toothpicks, spoons, really anything) Objective: Visual puzzle. Directions: Put several sticks on the ground in a random position and then ask the group what number you have put down. You can act as though you are thinking very hard about how you are arranging the sticks, or not thinking at all, depending on how long you have been doing this trick and the frustration level of your group. Solution: The number actually has nothing to do with the sticks – it’s about how many fingers you have on the ground. You can repeat over and over until the students figure it out. If they start to get very frustrated, you can repeat patterns while using different numbers or toss the sticks haphazardly to emphasize how little they actually matter. CROSSED, UNCROSSED Time: 20-25 min Equipment: Two sticks (or other similarly-shaped objects) Objective: Seated puzzle.
  63. 63. 56 Directions: Everyone sits in a circle. You begin with two sticks. You must pass the sticks to the person next to you, saying “I received these sticks _____ (crossed or uncrossed), and I pass them to you _____ (crossed or uncrossed).” As with most parlor games, the ceremony of saying all the words each time is important. Kids have to figure out if they are receiving and passing the sticks crossed or uncrossed, as the sticks get passed around the circle. You simply tell them if they are right or wrong. Solution: Really, it has nothing to do with the sticks – it’s all about the legs of the person with the sticks and the person receiving the sticks. If their legs are uncrossed (aka straight or off to the side), then they receive the sticks uncrossed. If the person next to them is sitting with crossed legs (pretzel style, or ankles crossed), then they pass the sticks crossed. You can make this more or less obvious, depending on the insight and/or frustration level of the group. JOHNNY JOHNNY (WHOOP!) Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Visual puzzle. Directions: Another brain teaser! The group is trying to mimic how you Johnny, and you are telling them if they succeed or not. Hold up one hand, with all your fingers spread out. With your other hand, tap the tip of each of your fingers in turn, starting with your pinky. For each finger, say “Johnny”. In between your index finger and thumb, slide your finger down the space in between like it’s a slide, and say “whoop!” Once you reach your thumb, tap and Johnny your way back to your pinky, again “whoop”-sliding between your thumb and index finger. So what you will actually be saying is: “Johnny (tap pinky), Johnny (tap ring finger), Johnny (tap middle finger), Johnny (tap index finger), whoop! (slide from index finger to thumb), Johnny (tap thumb), whoop! (slide from thumb to index finger), Johnny (tap index finger), Johnny (tap middle finger), Johnny (tap ring finger), Johnny (tap pinky).” Solution: Just like most parlor games, the solution has nothing to do with the Johnnys or the whoops. When you are finished, you cross your arms across your chest, and that is how you successfully Johnny! Again, you can make the solution more or less obvious depending on group insight and frustration level.
  64. 64. 57 MAN ON THE MOON Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Brain teaser. Directions: The group tries to draw the Man on the Moon, after you show them how. Draw him in the air with your finger, describing how he looks as you draw him. Here’s what you say (and draw): “The man on the moon is round (draw a circle), has two eyes (draw two eyes/dots), a nose (draw a nose/dot), and a mouth (draw a mouth).” They try to draw him. Solution: As per usual with these parlor games, what you’re actually drawing doesn’t matter at all. The trick is to draw the Man on the Moon with your LEFT hand. As most people are right handed, they often don’t catch onto this fact. Again, as people catch on or get frustrated, you can make this more or less obvious. You can draw the man on the moon as “round” (but actually draw him as a triangle) or with “two eyes” (but instead he has seven!!) or anything like that. Modify to keep your group engaged. THE MINISTER’S CAT Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Verbal puzzle. Directions: This is a game in which the group tries to figure out how to describe the Minister’s Cat (you can also change this into anyone’s cat – the name doesn’t matter). You start by describing the cat, and they all take their turn trying to successfully describe the cat. EX: “The Minister’s Cat is an astonishing cat.” Solution: This is an alphabet game – whatever the first letter of the adjective you used to describe the Minister’s Cat must also be the first letter that they use to describe the Minister’s Cat. EX: “The Minister’s Cat is an amazing cat.” “The Minister’s Cat is an awesome cat.” Alternative: If everyone figures out the solution, then this game can change. This time, go around in a circle, and after each completion of a circle of describing the Minister’s Cat, move on to the next letter of the alphabet. If anyone repeats an adjective or cannot think of an adjective beginning with the letter you are on, they are then out.
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  66. 66. 59 EXPANDING COMFORT ZONE These activities are designed with well-formed groups in mind. They challenge participants to move beyond their current group roles and seek improvement both in themselves and in their relationships with other group members. ANONYMOUS FEEDBACK Time: 25-30 min Equipment: Writing materials/index cards Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to expand their comfort zones. Directions: The group fills out 3x5 index cards, writing two of their greatest concerns or issues on the front of the card. The cards must be filled out in the same color pen or all in pencil to keep the anonymity. When all of the cards are filled out, the participants should get up and move around passing the note cards around so no one knows who has whose cards. The participants sit back down and read the comments written on the card out loud in the first person (as if it’s their own card, regardless of who wrote it). There is no discussion about what is on the card until all of the cards have been read. This way the important things rise to the top and then the discussion begins. The role of the staff should be nothing more than facilitating the dialogue. DO THIS! Time: 5 minutes Equipment: Pieces of paper and writing utensils Objective: Life lesson – the Golden Rule. Directions: First have everyone write their name on a slip of paper. Then each person picks a piece of paper with a person’s name written on it. They then write on that piece of paper something they want that person to do. Then the person who wrote it has to actually do it! This game has to do with not asking someone to do something you wouldn’t want to do. (AKA the Golden Rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you) MAZE Time: 15-20 min Equipment: Materials to create grid on floor (tape, string, or place markers) Objective: Providing opportunity for group members to expand their comfort zones.
  67. 67. 60 Directions: The facilitator sets up a grid on the floor and maps a path across it on a secret paper. The path goes from one adjacent square to another, but is not marked on the actual squares, only on the secret paper. The facilitator beeps, snickers or makes some other noise when the jumper goes to the wrong square. When that happens, the student must go back to the beginning and start over. Debrief: a) What helped/hindered finding a solution? b) How did you figure out how to complete activity? c) What was the purpose of this game? WHAT DID YOU CALL ME? Time: 20-25 min Equipment: None Objective: Fun and gives opportunity for group members to showcase each other’s strengths. Directions: Choose an animal for the person next to you and then say why (good way to show support for others). Then that person picks an animal for themselves and why. Continue in this fashion around the circle until everyone has had a chance to speak. Do not pull this game out until everyone knows each other pretty well like in the “performing stage”.
  68. 68. 61 SCIENCE GAMES These games and activities are designed to teach scientific concepts and enhance lessons. Nearly all of them can be modified to your specific needs and many have suggestions to help make these modifications. BEAR-SALMON-MOSQUITO Time: 15-20 min Equipment: None Objective: Fun, active and shows interconnectedness between three species – you can change them to be anything applicable to what you are teaching or where you are. Directions: This game works like a giant, group version of Rock Paper Scissors, combined with Tag. Divide the group in two and define a playing field with two well- defined opposing safe zones (one for each team), and an obvious center line. Explain to the group that you’re playing a game like Rock Paper Scissors, except instead we’re going to be Bears (“show me what a bear looks like!”), Salmon (“how do salmon move?”), and Mosquitos (“what do mosquitos do?”). They should come up with agreed-upon actions for the three critters. After everyone knows what the actions look like, and who beats whom (Bear beats Salmon, Salmon beats Mosquito, Mosquito beats Bear), each team will go to their safe zone and choose two organisms as a team – one is their first choice, and the other is a backup (in case both teams choose the same organism). When both teams have decided, they meet in the center and line up across the playing field. On the count of three each team does the action for the creature they chose. Whichever team wins the interaction (i.e. the team that chose Mosquito wins over the team that chose Bear) then chases the losing team across the playing field. Members that are tagged by the winning team before reaching their safe zone then become a part of that team. Members of the losing team that make it back into their safe zone stay a part of their original team. Repeat! Alternative: You can change the three organisms to be anything that applies to your program and fits the guidelines of Rock Paper Scissors – that is that each organism beats one organism and is beaten by the other organism.
  69. 69. 62 CAMOUFLAGE Time: 15-20 min Equipment: None – best played outdoors in a large space with many obstacles and hiding spaces. Objective: Fun and is a great opportunity to discuss behavioral vs. physical adaptations, what it means to camouflage, and different (really cool!) examples of camouflage – both behavioral and physical. Directions: One person is chosen to be the Eagle. The Eagle picks a good vantage point to see a lot of the surrounding area. They then cover their eyes and count LOUDLY to 60 while everyone else runs and hides. After reaching 60, the Eagle opens his/her eyes and tries to spot people hiding – the catch is that the Eagle cannot move his/her feet from where they are. The Eagle can turn around and crouch down or go on tippy toes, but can’t actually move his/her feet from the spot they started. But there’s ANOTHER catch! The people hiding MUST be able to see the Eagle at all times – this is why it’s Camouflage and not just Hide and Seek. To prove that they can see the Eagle, the Eagle will (randomly, without announcing it) hold up a number on their hands near their face (so people hiding can target being able to see the Eagle’s face and know they will be able to see the number). Once you have been spotted by the Eagle, you are out, and cannot help the Eagle find more people. Once the Eagle can’t find anyone else, they announce the second round, cover their eyes, and count loudly to 30 while everyone re-hides CLOSER to the Eagle. Repeat the same process with the searching and holding up a number. If not everyone is found, there can be a third round (count to 20!), so there will be three numbers to prove you could see the Eagle to be able to win. The last person to be found is the winner. If multiple people can’t be found at the end, the person who is hiding closest to the Eagle (and knows all three numbers) is the winner! CHARADES WITH A PURPOSE – AKA LNT (LEAVE NO TRACE) CHARADES Time: 15-20 min Equipment: A list of something you are trying to teach (such as the seven principles of Leave No Trace), and that list broken down into individual slips of paper that can be drawn. Objective: To learn a list of attributes or principles that otherwise might be challenging to remember. LNT is a great example, but you could also do this for the requirements for natural selection to take place, the Bill of Rights, principles of diving, rules of a place you are visiting, etc.

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