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Women and child welfare

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Women and child welfare

Publié dans : Environnement
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Women and child welfare

  1. 1. WOMEN CHILD WELFARE By- K.MANIKANTH AND
  2. 2. WOMEN- SOURCE OF EXISTENCE • “Women”, the entire world is dependent on them for its existence. • Women who is called as jannani in Vedas means the birth giver the mother of life all this sounds great and these words used for her clearly depicts that she is the one who is to be given the highest respect in the society, but the truth lies somewhere really far from this statement. • A Sanskrit phrase goes like, “Yatra Nariyastu Pujyante, Ramante tatra Devah”. • It means, where women are respected, gods reside there, or good luck follows there. Ref. By www.timesofindia.com
  3. 3. NEED FOR WOMEN WELFARE • The world depends on women for existence. • They are the victims of capitalism, development & environment. • They suffer in a number of ways because they are: * Weaker * Helpless * Economically dependent * Illiteracy * Wide Gender Discretion Ref. By en.wikipedia.org
  4. 4. SOME FAMOUS WOMEN MOTHER TERESA KALPANA CHAWLA Ref. By en.wikipedia.org Ref. By www.weebly.com P.T.USHA Ref. By www.speedstar.in INDIRA GANDHI Ref. By www.biography.com SAROJINI NAIDU Ref. By www.iloveindia.com
  5. 5. Problems Illiteracy Poverty Domestic Violence Female Feticides Improper Sanitation Child Marriage SecurityGender Divide Lack of Health Care Child Abuse Shortage of Food Population III Practices like-Dowry
  6. 6. WHAT HAS BEEN DONE • The empowerment of women is one of the central issues in the process of development of countries all over the world. • The Government of India had made Empowerment of Women as one of the principal objectives of the Ninth Five Year Plan (1997-2002) and also declared 2001 as the year of ‘Women’s Empowerment’. • Also, Year 2003 was regarded as the Year of Adolescent Girls. Ref. By www.tutorvista.com
  7. 7. POLICIES AND PROGRAMMES • From the Fifth Five Year Plan (1974-1978) onwards has been a marked shift in the approach to women’s issues from welfare to development. • The National Commission for Women was set up by an Act of Parliament in 1990 to safeguard the rights and legal entitlements of Women. • Then 73rd and 74th Amendments (1993) to the Constitutions of India have provided for reservation of seats in the local bodies of Panchayats and Municipalities for women. • National Policy for the Empowerment of Women was formulated 2001. • Women Health Volunteers (Accredited Social Health Activitist): started during 2005-2006 with an objective of providing health services in rural sector. • Girl Child Protection Scheme(GCPS): launched in 2005 by Child Welfare and Disabled Welfare (JJ) Department.
  8. 8. ROLE OF NGO’S • Alarippu Works on awareness generation, education and training, health and nutrition among women and youth. • Jagori A resource centre focussing on women’s issues: violence against women, alternative health systems, sexual violence, communication, trafficking of women and children. • Sahara Runs a care home for HIV+ women. • UNIFEM The UN’s development fund for women; provides financial and technical assistance to innovative programmes and strategies that promote women’s human rights, political participation and economic security. • Naz Foundation(India) Trust Has programmes on women’s sexual health, clinical intervention (to control STDs and bring about behaviour change to check the spread of HIV), research and a care home. • Institute of Social Studies Trust (ISST) Conducts research and action programmes to promote social justice and equity for the under-privilege with focus on women.
  9. 9. WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE • Legal-judicial system should be made more responsive and gender sensitive to women’s needs, especially in cases of domestic violence and personal assault. • New laws should be enacted and existing laws reviewed to ensure that justice is quick and apt punishment is given. • Mainstreaming of Gender Perspective in the Development Process. • Social Empowerment of Women. • Need of psychological reforms of the people’s general mind set. • Awareness among people about their rights.
  10. 10. CHILDREN-CITIZEN OF TOMORROW • Children are considered to be important assets for a country’s future. In India, a child is born in every one second. • In our country, a large number of children below the age of 6 live in economically and socially deprived environment which hinders their physical and mental development. • Poverty, poor sanitation, malnutrition and under nutrition, diseases and infections, lack of primary health care, limited access to primary health care, limited access to primary education are some of the main factors which affect the children in India. • Nutritious foods along with educational and recreational facilities are basic child rights. • A significant number of new born infants are abandoned every year due to socio-economic reasons. • More than 12 million children below the age of 14 years are working as child labours in hazardous occupations. These include matchstick industry, firework industry, diamond kilns, etc. • Government of India in August 1947 proclaimed a national policy on children declaring children as “supremely important assets”.
  11. 11. NEED FOR CHILD WELFARE • Lack of nation-wide uniform practices in child welfare . • A need for a more child-oriented approach in child welfare. • Practical operators. • Social work researchers. • New Child Welfare Act commenced on 1 January 2008- aims at early support, preventive work, child-oriented method, systematic working approach, uniform decision-making, increased cooperation between authorities.
  12. 12. PROBLEMS FACED BY CHILDREN • Child Labour • Malnutrition • No Education • Undergo many dreadful diseases like: * Pneumonia * Measles * Diarrhoea * Malaria • Working in hazardous places to feed themselves. • Undergo many respiratory problems due to pollution in the environment.
  13. 13. CHILD PROTECTION • Orphans, abandoned & destitute children • Missing or run-away children • Street & working children • Children of sex workers • Abused, tortured and exploited children • Children indulging in substance abuse • Children affected by HIV/AIDS • Children affected by natural calamities, emergencies and man made disasters • Children with disabilities • Child beggars • Children suffering from terminal/incurable disease Ref. By www.childprotection.org
  14. 14. POLICIES AND PROGRAMMES • Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS). • The first ICDS project was launched in India with 33 Project in all over the country on 2nd October 1975. • Setting up of Aanganwadi centers. • JUVENILE JUSTICE (CARE AND PROTECTION OF CHILDREN) ACT 2000. • SETTING UP OF JUVENILE SHELTER HOMES. • State Commission for protection of Child rights. • FINANCIALASSISTANCE SCHEMES. • Girl Child Protection Schemes. • National Crèche Fund (1994). • National Charter for Children (2004). • National Plan of Action for Children (2005).
  15. 15. ROLE OF NGO’S • Action Aid India concentrates on child education and on street and working children. • CRY targets underprivileged children who don’t have basic resources to sustain themselves. • Butterflies engage themselves in offering free education to poor kids. They teach children living in slums in Delhi. • CARE India with branches in 11 states focus on girl child education. • Prayas address issues related to lack of sensitivity and infrastructure for children’s rehabilitation, education, and reintegration. • CREDA focuses on child labour related activities. It has undertaken projects for the elimination and rehabilitation of child labour around Varanasi (Uttar Pradesh). • Global March Against Child Labour is a global movement against child labour. It has partners in over 150 countries and is based in New Delhi. • World Vision India conducts nine special initiative programmes, targeting in particular street children, bonded child labourers and child victims of sexual exploitation.

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