Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Beginners Guide to VBI

This Guide to VBI is designed to answer common questions you have about this rapidly growing technology. It will demonstrate to you what VBI is and how it can help your company. It will also show you how to select the right VBI system for your needs, and what investments are required for success. It will also explain:
• How VBI can support loss prevention
• How VBI is helping business operations to become more effective
• The role of VBI in merchandising
• How VBI works within overall risk management
• The return on investment for VBI
• Typical deployments of VBI
• So is VBI for you?

  • Identifiez-vous pour voir les commentaires

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Beginners Guide to VBI

  1. 1.               Beginner's Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)
  2. 2. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 1          Beginner's Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)     Contents    Why Read This Guide On VBI? ............................................................................................................... 2  VBI Defined ............................................................................................................................................. 2  Who  Uses VBI? ....................................................................................................................................... 3  How Can VBI  Support Loss Prevention? ............................................................................................... 3  How Is VBI Helping Business Operations To Become More Effective? ................................................ 4  The Role of VBI in Merchandising .......................................................................................................... 6  How Does VBI Work Within Overall Risk Management? ...................................................................... 6  The Return On Investment For VBI ........................................................................................................ 7  Typical VBI Deployments ....................................................................................................................... 7  Why Is VBI More Relevant Today Than Ever? ....................................................................................... 8  Is VBI For You? ........................................................................................................................................ 9       
  3. 3. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 2        Why Read This Guide On VBI?      The security industry is going through a major transformation. As it moves from systems which require a  lot of human intervention into a more streamlined delivery process, it also provides for enhanced ways  to view security, marketing and operations. This is particularly relevant for retail deployments, where  technologies typically associated with security can be very easily used to help improve overall business  performance.   From its inception, closed‐circuit television (CCTV) was primarily used to review recorded data. As its use  progressed, alarms were integrated in with video, which created actionable intelligence.  Data was then  integrated with video and information was extracted from the metadata video. That was the tipping  point.    What drove this? It was innovation. It was the digital chip. It was the digitalization of video and the  integration of video analytics. It was the Internet and IP, the ubiquity of bandwidth, the robustness and  the magnitude of that bandwidth, and finally the cost reductions both in storage and transmission  technologies. With all of this advancement, a perfect storm was created to allow new solutions to be  engineered.   Technologies that aggregate the vast amount of disparate data—video data, transactional data,  structured and unstructured data—that is generated today, and distils that data into relevant business  intelligence that can be easily understood and acted upon; that’s VBI.  This Guide to VBI is intended to provide readers with an overview about this emerging technology. It will  clarify what VBI is and how it can create actionable intelligence. It will also explain:   • How VBI can support loss prevention   • How VBI is helping business operations become more effective  • The role of VBI in merchandising  • How VBI works within overall risk management  • The return on investment for VBI  • Typical deployments of VBI   • If VBI is for you    VBI Defined    Video Business Intelligence (VBI) software captures, compiles and disseminates data from disparate  systems presenting the aggregated results through intuitive dashboards, reports and portals. VBI serves  as an information infrastructure capable of delivering specific and actionable business intelligence to  users enabling them to make informed, effective and timely decisions about their business, assets and  employees. 
  4. 4. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 3        As its name implies, Video Business Intelligence has at its core the ability to fuse video data with  structured data, typically the only data analysed in more traditional Business Intelligence (BI) solutions.   This unique approach enables users to grasp the impact human interaction has on their businesses.    Extensively used in retail applications, VBI’s advanced algorithms enable users to leverage their video  surveillance infrastructure to gain visual insight and context behind other data captured from Point‐of‐ Sale (POS) systems, access control devices, central monitoring stations, and exception reporting  modules, to name but a few.  With VBI, the role of video surveillance has evolved from solely a loss prevention tool to a valuable asset  that can be used by the entire organization to help optimize retail processes and improve business  efficiencies.    Who Uses VBI?    Today VBI is primarily used by retail organizations, but other industries such as industrial automation,  education, finance, and the transportation industry are also experiencing the advantages this technology  provides.     How Can VBI Support Loss Prevention?    Video surveillance has played a pivotal role in loss prevention for years. To many, video is seen as an  essential component to any effective loss prevention initiative. By integrating an organization’s business  systems with video and advanced video analytics; detection, classification and tracking of video content 
  5. 5. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 4        can provide administrators real‐time alerts and visual (as well as audio) verification of events without  the need to add additional hardware components.  The ability to effectively detect and deter cashier‐related shrinkage is a top priority for retailers  worldwide. Research has shown that employee theft remains the single largest cause of shrinkage in  retail environments today.[3] Millions of dollars disappear from Point‐of‐Sale (POS) terminals in retail  stores on a daily basis due to fraudulent or criminal employee activities. One way that retailers are  confronting this epidemic is by identifying the telltale patterns of these crimes—so‐called POS  exceptions. POS exceptions are transactions that differ from the norm. These can include:  • Manually entered values, which could be an indication of system manipulation  • Product return transactions with no item present, no customer present, or no supervisor  present  • No‐sales when the cash register is opened but no transaction is registered.  The art of identifying and capturing these exceptions is the basis behind exception‐based reporting.  Incorporating video data as a complement to the transactional data captured by the typical POS system  elevates the effectiveness of these tools by delivering both video images and textual data resulting in a  more complete picture of any event or transaction in question.  By establishing a set of user‐defined exception‐based rules, Loss Prevention (LP) managers can receive  real‐time alerts anytime that events or actions fall outside of these parameters. In this way, Loss  Prevention can not only increase its effectiveness, it can begin to transform itself from a reactive to a  responsive, proactive resource for the entire organization. Now, LP departments can leverage relevant  transactional data (including cash register, time of day, employee number, dollar amount, exception  kind, and transaction type) and associated surveillance video to identify trends and capture details that  can lead to improved loss prevention, as well as increased operational efficiencies and overall store  performance.  Aberdeen Group research indicates that 76% of top performing retailers use some form of data mining  and exception‐based reporting tools to help build a knowledge culture around loss prevention. [4]  By leveraging technology and proactively driving the investigation the user can actively uncover errors,  inefficiencies, and questionable or dishonest practices. As a result, detection occurs sooner allowing for  a quicker response and a more timely resolution of the issues encountered. This enhanced  responsiveness and effectiveness to loss prevention initiatives is not only reflected in the organization’s  bottom line, but in the Loss Prevention department’s financial validation, as well and opens the door to  new in‐store research methods.    How is VBI Helping Business Operations Become More Effective?    Video analytics is a natural extension to video‐supported exception‐based reporting, and is not limited  only to loss prevention activities. Video analytics can help increase operational and employee 
  6. 6. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 5        efficiencies using video that the user may already collect. Examples of a few of the benefits that can be  gained by enabling video business intelligence along with appropriate video analytics include:  • Alerting store managers when queues exceed pre‐defined thresholds at tills or customer  service kiosks, allowing for rapid response in reallocating employee responsibilities to ensure  optimal customer service.  • Monitoring the number of people entering or leaving the store during specified time periods  to determine ideal staffing levels.  • Receiving real‐time alerts when aisles or exit ways are obstructed to immediately asses and  remedy the situation.  Video analytics can also be a valuable and effective tool helping users detect gaps in staff training or  store management. They can also assist in elevating awareness of outstanding employee behaviour  providing the opportunity to acknowledge and praise good  performance.  Operations can optimize staffing to match customer traffic,  and traffic counts (people counting) combined with POS  data can be used to calculate conversion rates. For  customers, satisfaction is increased with more efficient  service which can expand sales opportunities, optimize  store performance and overall operational efficiency and  profitability.  In retail environments, some stores perform better than  others. And, over time, any given store can have variances  in day‐to‐day sales. With the right insight, which can often  be provided through the use of video business intelligence,  managers can view analytics to determine why certain  locations are not performing as well as others. Perhaps  there is not enough stock available on shelves, or employee  break or lunch times are not well scheduled, leaving  customers underserved during prime sales times. No  matter the reason, linking this information with other  available store data can assist in uncovering problems and  opportunities.  Weather can be a major influence on store traffic. VBI can  even capture weather history as a data point when  assessing outliers in traffic data.  Operations departments have, with VBI, “single pane”  awareness through user‐definable dashboards and reports  assisting them in reviewing the health and viability of their  organization. The use of these analytics then allows them  to make well‐informed, critical decisions in a timely matter—decisions based on data, not assumptions 
  7. 7. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 6        The Role of VBI in Merchandising    Video Business Intelligence can also serve as a valuable business tool for Marketing and Merchandising  departments. Several ways that these areas can benefit include video analytics and video business  intelligence that can be enabled to include:  • Assessing the time shoppers linger in front of an end‐cap or promotional poster to gauge  customer interest in the product or offer.  • Identifying traffic patterns to determine where customers are congregating in the store, or  conversely what areas of the store have little traffic to better organize store layout and  arrange inventory.  By using the analytics already captured, Marketing can access metrics to analyze not only customer  behavior, but also the promotional effectiveness of marketing campaigns. Was a new ad or promotional  offer successful in bringing people into the store? When they came in, where did they go? Was the  promotional item they were searching for placed in an optimal location?  Marketing can even combine this information with POS data to calculate conversion rates, once again  utilizing an asset traditionally dedicated to Loss Prevention into a corporate asset that can increase  sales. This enhanced understanding of buyer’s behavior provides users with critical insights when  designing marketing and promotional materials to optimize merchandising activities.  Merchants can additionally analyze store traffic to identify patterns, gaining knowledge on premium  areas for product placement. Locations that are not attracting customers can also be identified. This  information can be invaluable when negotiating with consumer packaged goods companies which pay a  premium to obtain the most desirable shelf space. Captured intelligence also serves as proof for  management that displays are up, product is placed and stocked at optimal levels, and signage is clear  and unencumbered.    How Does VBI Work Within Overall Risk Management?    The value that video business intelligence and video analytics can provide in the area of risk  management is extensive. While the data captured by the surveillance system can be leveraged outside  of the parameters typically viewed as Loss Prevention, the core responsibility does remain protecting  the assets of the organization; and one way to accomplish this is through the appropriate management  of risk. Organizations can benefit by enabling functions to include:  • Capturing data that identifies behaviors or patterns that create risk for the organization,  employees or patrons such as blocked exit areas enabling staff to quickly respond to  conditions requiring attention. 
  8. 8. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 7        • Bringing visual (and audio) verification into the equation when conducting an audit to see first‐ hand what actually transpired; especially valuable when confronted with a costly slip‐and‐fall  claim or an employee accident.  • Receiving alerts on loitering activities taking place either inside or outside of a store to ensure  quick response, which may assist in eliminating possible theft or damage to property.  The financial losses that can occur from fraudulent claims, lawsuits, or insurance payouts may devastate  a business operation. In cases where an accident has occurred, proper investigation is aided by clear  identification of the severity of the situation, who (or what) is responsible, and what action needs to be  taken. Liability may also be minimized if it is determined that the accident was staged. Using video  business intelligence in conjunction with video analytics allows the organization the ability to mitigate  risk through the discovery of situations where corporate adherence is not present or fraudulent  activities are taking place.    The Return on Investment for VBI    Those organizations utilizing advanced video analytics find that their return on investment can be  increased through noticing, and acting upon, activities that create shrinkage. By proper implementation  of recommended actions, Loss Prevention managers often find that the payback of such systems may be  obtained rapidly through the lessening of employee or patron theft.   Managers no longer have to look for data, or make assumptions on the reasons for shrinkage, the  information is provided to them through the capture of real, actionable data based on facts. For  marketing and merchandising purposes, trend data allows the ability to predict or identify anomalies  that can then be analyzed to assist in determining the effectiveness of marketing and merchandising  campaigns; providing a valuable tool in planning future activities to strengthen sales.    Typical VBI Deployments     Video Business Intelligence has been widely deployed in a number of large retail organizations, where  capturing and understanding data is used to provide valuable and actionable insight. Just an example of  the companies that have embraced its use, and the considerable insight that is provided include; Nike  USA, Sterling Jewelers, Home Depot, and 7‐11 to name a few. Beyond the retail sector, VBI applications  are being embraced by a number of industries such as transportation, financial services, public safety  and educational institutions.   
  9. 9. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 8        Why is VBI More Relevant Today Than Ever?     Research conducted in the area of Video Business Intelligence in 2013 confirms that Chief Financial  Officers continue to emphasize business intelligence (BI)/analytics and business applications as top areas  for investment and focus. As reported in a joint study conducted by Garter, Inc. and Financial Executives  International (FEI) it was shown that 15 of the top 19 businesses processes that CFOs identified requiring  improved technology support may be addressed and/or improved with investments in these areas.[5]  The business intelligence market (including data warehousing and CRM analytics) is growing faster than  other areas of the enterprise application arena at approximately nine percent annually. Valued at $57  billion in in 2010 ($30 billion from business intelligence services, $10.5 billion from BI  platforms/analytics and $10.5 billion from data warehousing), and allowing for the predicted growth,  the BI market could increase to $81 billion by 2014; and if current trends continue a market worth as  much as $136 billion could be expected by 2020 . As noted by Gartner Analyst, Rita Sallam,  approximately 30 percent of users currently deal with analytics, but growth is expected to rise to around  50 percent by 2014 and could reach 75 percent by 2020.[6]     
  10. 10. Beginner’s Guide to Video Business Intelligence (VBI)  March 1, 2014       Page 9        Is VBI For You?   Use this worksheet to determine if your company is ready to use VBI.  For each category, select the appropriate number. If you strongly disagree, choose 1. If you strongly  agree, choose 5. The numbers in between 1 and 5 correspond to your level of agreement, neutrality, or  disagreement. Add up your score when you’re finished, and follow the instructions at the end.   Factor  Disagree                                                            Agree  1                  2                   3                   4                   5  Loss prevention is a major focus for my organization as  shrinkage is a problem.    We need more insight into where shrinkage is occurring.       We need clearer reporting back to management on our  activities to stem shrinkage.     We need more intelligence on what video to watch.      It would be impossible to respond to every alarm we  generate.    We use contracted security services, and are finding that we  have a high turnover of contracted staff.    We would improve the perception of security if we were able  to play a bigger role within other areas of the business.    We would like to ensure our investment in security systems  offers value outside of security and loss prevention.     Security within our organization is very reactive.      We need to ensure more is done to prevent organizational  risk such as fraudulent claims and litigation.       To interpret your results, add up your score.   • If you scored > 35, you’re ready for VBI.   • If you scored between 20 and 35, you’re moving in that direction. You should consider getting  started with VBI very soon.   • If you scored under 20, you may not be ready for VBI quite yet. But that doesn’t mean you can’t  keep reading!   Regardless of your score, there’s good news: Where you are now is exactly where you need to be in  order to get more from your security investment. Why delay? Call 3xLOGIC and See Your Business  Differently™.       6510 West 91st  Avenue    |   Westminster, CO 80031     303.485.5779   |    www.3xlogic.com      © 2007‐2014 3xLOGIC, Inc. All rights reserved. Information in this document subject to change without notice.  3xLOGIC, VIGIL Trends, See Your Business Differently and the 3xLOGIC logo are trademarks of 3xLOGIC Inc. All  other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. 

×