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Cooking with farm grown product

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Cooking with farm grown product

  1. 1. Cooking With Farm Grown Product Sanitation, Safety and storage • Cleaning • Controlling Bacteria • Commercial cleaning methods Product Usage • Harvest • Seasons Preserving the harvest Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  2. 2. “Dinner in the Field” Dinner Zephyros Farm 2008 The First Culinary Educational Farm to Table Dinner in the World Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  3. 3. Receiving product • Clean excessive dirt, dry and store product for later use • Excessive water will cause mold and rotting • Cut tops from root vegetables • Root vegetables will lose nutrients and wilt if stored with tops on • Tops may by used for additional applications • Refresh wilting greens in tepid water • Make a fresh cut on the stem so water can be absorbed • Remove excess water for longer storage • Store vegetables according to type: most vegetables prefer dry, cool to cold temperatures and dark. • Cover to prevent wilting in refrigeration Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  4. 4. Late Harvest Bounty Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  5. 5. Controlling Bacteria Prior to processing and production of product soak all garden vegetables in an alkaline solution. • 2 Tablespoons Baking soda & 2 Tablespoons salt in a 5 gallon bucket of water filled to 4 gallons • Soak product for 15 minutes • Rinse all product in fresh water to remove alkaline residue Avoid storing low acid vegetables in an anaerobic environment (no oxygen) to avoid botulism. • Garlic in oil even after roasted should be stored under refrigeration. • When processing tomatoes add lemon juice to ensure a pH of at least 4.6. Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  6. 6. Conventional Methods for Cleaning Vegetables • Organic vegetables sold in grocery stores and supermarkets are soaked in a 5% bleach solution. • Conventional vegetables grown with pesticides and chemicals are not always washed to remove these poisons. • Additional waxes and preservatives may be added. Dirty Dozen conventional vegetables to avoid • Apples, celery, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers • Grapes, hot peppers, imported nectarines, peaches • Potatoes, strawberries, spinach Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  7. 7. Old World Cooking Reclaimed Wild Game Livestock Head to Hoof Cooking Artisan Practices Wild Yeasted Breads Cheese making Winemaking Preserving Pickling Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  8. 8. Seasonal cooking & utilizing storage crops Seasonal crops • Plan menus around what is being harvested • Vary preparations for diversity • Utilize vegetables at different stages of growth i.e. pea shoots • Adapt to abundant harvest i.e. zucchini Storage crops • Utilize the stored crops from the previous season • Plan harvesting to maximize product availability • Sun chokes can be harvested in the fall or the spring • Harvesting in the spring when other crops are less abundant is more efficient Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  9. 9. Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  10. 10. Food Preservation Methods Canning & pickling • Boiling water bath canning • High acid foods with a pH 4.6 or lower • Addition of acid for low acid foods • Pressure canning • Low acid foods • Utilizes pressure to obtain higher temperatures Fermenting • Fermenting crock • Salt, whey or starter culture • Increases nutrients in food • Unlocks essential nutrients Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  11. 11. Preserving the Harvest Drying Food • Sun dried • Food dryers • Dehydrators Harvesting Seeds • Legumes • Dry on the vine, remove pods and store • Retain some of harvest for nest seasons crop • Be careful of plants that cross polinate • Grains Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder
  12. 12. Additional resources can be found at the bottom of the syllabus page Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder

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