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Occurrence of Disease Morbidity
Dr. Swe Mar Myint Lwin
Assistant Lecturer
Epidemiology Department
University of Public Hea...
Morbidity
• Morbidity has been defined as “any departure ,subjective or
objective from a state of physiological well-being...
Tools of Measurements
Basic tools of measurements in epidemiology are-
• Ratios
• Proportions
• Rates
• Ratio is one number divided by another number
• Numerator is not a component of denominator
• For example-sex ratio, doc...
a
a + b X 100
• Proportion is also one number divided by another, but the
entities represented by these numbers are relate...
Rates
• A rate measures the occurrence of some particular event
(development of disease or occurrence of death) in a popul...
Categories of rates
• Crude rates- the actual observed rates such as the birth and
death rates. Crude rates are also known...
The concept of numerator and denominator
Numerator - a component of denominator in rate, but not in ratio.
Denominator - R...
What are they—ratio, proportion, or rate?
• The number of people who ate tuna salad divided by the
number of people who di...
Population: A population is defined as a group of people with a
common characteristic such as place of residence, age, or ...
• Three factors should always be considered when
measuring how commonly a disease occurs in a
population:
(1) the number o...
-Same population size and time period should be used for the
compared groups.
MEASURES OF MORBIDITY
1.Prevalence
a. Period Prevalence
b. Point Prevalence
2.Incidence
a. Cumulative Incidence (Risk)
b. ...
1.Prevalence
• Prevalence is defined as the number of affected persons present
in the population at a specific time divide...
Prevalence
Example
• Of 10,000 female residents in town A on 1st January 2006,
1,000 have hypertension.
• The prevalence o...
• For example, if we are interested in knowing the
prevalence of arthritis in a certain community on a
certain date, we mi...
A. Point prevalence
• Point prevalence refers to the proportion of the
population that is diseased at a single point of ti...
• Returning to point prevalence, practically speaking, it is
virtually impossible to survey an entire city on a single day...
B. Period prevalence
• Period prevalence refers to the proportion of the population
that is diseased during a specified du...
• Prevalence = a photograph (instantaneous
record)
• Incidence = a film (continuous record)
2.Incidence
• The incidence rate of a disease is defined as the number
of new cases of a disease that occur during a speci...
• If we are calculating incidence of uterine cancer, the denominator
must include only women, because men would not have t...
People at Risk Who Are Observed throughout
a Defined Time Period
• The choice of time period is arbitrary: (can calculate ...
A. Cumulative incidence or Risk
• The incidence calculated using a period of time during which all
of the individuals in t...
• It is important to note that the denominator is the total number of
people who were free of disease at the start of the ...
When All People Are Not Observed for the Full Time
period, Person-Time, or Units of Time When Each Person
Is Observed
• Wh...
• Let us consider person-years (py):
• One person at risk who is observed for one year = one
person-year.
• One person at ...
• If people at risk are observed for different periods of time, the
incidence rate is:
• Although it is most accurate to determine person-time on an
individual basis, as was done in this study, this method is ...
• Figure: Hypothetical Disease Occurrence
• Point prevalence rate at t1 = 4 / 10
• Point prevalence rate at t2 = 3 / 10
• ...
Relationship Between Prevalence and Incidence
• This equation assumes that the population is in steady state
(that is, inf...
Comment?
Special Incidence rates
• Attack rate or case rate
• Secondary attack rate
• Hospital admission rate
Attack Rate or case r...
Secondary attack rate
It is defined as the number of exposed persons developing the
disease within the range of the incuba...
Uses of prevalence
1. Helps to estimate the magnitude of health or disease problems
in the community
2. Helps to identify ...
Uses of incidence rate
Incidence rate is useful for taking action
1) to control disease &
2) For research into
• Etiology ...
REVIEW QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTER 3
Q. A prevalence survey conducted from January 1 through
December 31, 2012, identified 1,000...
• Q. Population of the city of Atlantis on March 30, 2012 =
183,000
• No. of new active cases of TB occurring between Janu...
6. The incidence rate of active cases of TB for the 6-month period
was:
a. 7 per 100,000 population
b. 14 per 100,000 popu...
7. The prevalence rate of active TB as of June 30, 2012,
was:
a. 14 per 100,000 population
b. 130 per 100,000 population
c...
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
Occurrence of disease morbidity
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Occurrence of disease morbidity

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Occurrence of disease morbidity

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Occurrence of disease morbidity

  1. 1. Occurrence of Disease Morbidity Dr. Swe Mar Myint Lwin Assistant Lecturer Epidemiology Department University of Public Health
  2. 2. Morbidity • Morbidity has been defined as “any departure ,subjective or objective from a state of physiological well-being”. • The term is used equivalent to such terms as sickness ,illness ,disability etc.
  3. 3. Tools of Measurements Basic tools of measurements in epidemiology are- • Ratios • Proportions • Rates
  4. 4. • Ratio is one number divided by another number • Numerator is not a component of denominator • For example-sex ratio, doctor-population ratio , child-women ratio X Y X KX:Y (or) 4 Ratios
  5. 5. a a + b X 100 • Proportion is also one number divided by another, but the entities represented by these numbers are related to one another. • The numerator is always a subset of the denominator. • It has no dimension because the unit of the numerator cancels out the unit of the denominator • Proportion is usually expressed as a percentage. E.g. The no. of children with scabies at a certain time X 100 The total no. of children in the village at the same time 5 Proportions
  6. 6. Rates • A rate measures the occurrence of some particular event (development of disease or occurrence of death) in a population during a given time period. • Eg: Number of death in one year Death rate = X 1000 Mid- year population
  7. 7. Categories of rates • Crude rates- the actual observed rates such as the birth and death rates. Crude rates are also known as unstandardized rates. • Specific rates-These are the actual observed rates due to specific causes (e.g ;TB) or occurring in specific groups (eg; age or sex group), or during specific time periods (annual ,monthly ,weekly rates) • Standardized rates- These are obtained by direct or indirect method of standardization or adjustment eg; age or sex standardized rates.
  8. 8. The concept of numerator and denominator Numerator - a component of denominator in rate, but not in ratio. Denominator - Related to total population (i) Mid-year population (ii) Population at risk (iii) Person-times (eg; person-years,person-months ) (iv) Person-distance (passenger-miles) (v) Subgroup of the population (age, gender, etc .) - Related to total events i.-in IMR; CFR ii. Per 100 vehicles or per million vehicles-miles in case of accidents.
  9. 9. What are they—ratio, proportion, or rate? • The number of people who ate tuna salad divided by the number of people who did not eat tuna salad • The number of sick people who ate tuna salad divided by the number of people who ate tuna salad • The number of people diagnosed with influenza on a cruise ship divided by the number of person-weeks of follow-up of people on the cruise ship 9
  10. 10. Population: A population is defined as a group of people with a common characteristic such as place of residence, age, or the occurrence of an event. • There are two main types of populations, fixed and dynamic (or open). • The membership of a fixed population is defined by a life event and is permanent, whereas the membership of a dynamic population is defined by a changeable characteristic and is transient.
  11. 11. • Three factors should always be considered when measuring how commonly a disease occurs in a population: (1) the number of affected individuals or cases, (2) the size of the population from which the cases arise, and (3) the amount of time that this population is followed.
  12. 12. -Same population size and time period should be used for the compared groups.
  13. 13. MEASURES OF MORBIDITY 1.Prevalence a. Period Prevalence b. Point Prevalence 2.Incidence a. Cumulative Incidence (Risk) b. Incidence density or Incidence Rate
  14. 14. 1.Prevalence • Prevalence is defined as the number of affected persons present in the population at a specific time divided by the number of persons in the population at that time.
  15. 15. Prevalence Example • Of 10,000 female residents in town A on 1st January 2006, 1,000 have hypertension. • The prevalence of hypertension among women in town A on this date is calculated as: • 1,000/10,000 = 0.1 or 10%
  16. 16. • For example, if we are interested in knowing the prevalence of arthritis in a certain community on a certain date, we might visit every household in that community and, using interviews or physical examinations, determine how many people have arthritis on that day. • This number becomes the numerator for prevalence. • The denominator is the population in the community on that date.
  17. 17. A. Point prevalence • Point prevalence refers to the proportion of the population that is diseased at a single point of time. Number of existing cases of disease At a point in time Number in total population
  18. 18. • Returning to point prevalence, practically speaking, it is virtually impossible to survey an entire city on a single day. • Therefore, although conceptually we are thinking in terms of a single point in time, in reality, the survey would take much longer. • When we see the word prevalence used without any modifier, it generally refers to point prevalence. • Although you should always specify the point in time to which point prevalence refers, prevalence is a proportion so it is dimensionless (i.e., it has no units).
  19. 19. B. Period prevalence • Period prevalence refers to the proportion of the population that is diseased during a specified duration of time (usually a month , a year, or 5 year period). Number of existing cases of disease During a period of time Number in total population
  20. 20. • Prevalence = a photograph (instantaneous record) • Incidence = a film (continuous record)
  21. 21. 2.Incidence • The incidence rate of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of a disease that occur during a specified period of time in a population at risk for developing the disease.
  22. 22. • If we are calculating incidence of uterine cancer, the denominator must include only women, because men would not have the potential to become part of the group that is counted by the numerator, that is, men are not at risk for developing uterine cancer. • Another important issue regarding the denominator is the issue of time. • Incidence measures can use two types of denominators: people at risk who are observed throughout a defined time period or, when all people are not observed for the full time period, person-time (or units of time when each person is observed).
  23. 23. People at Risk Who Are Observed throughout a Defined Time Period • The choice of time period is arbitrary: (can calculate incidence in 1 week, incidence in 1 month, incidence rate in 1 year, incidence rate in 5 years, and so on). • The important point is that whatever time period is used in the calculation must be clearly specified, and all individuals included in the calculation must have been observed (at risk) for the entire period.
  24. 24. A. Cumulative incidence or Risk • The incidence calculated using a period of time during which all of the individuals in the population are considered to be at risk for the outcome is also called cumulative incidence, which is a measure of risk.
  25. 25. • It is important to note that the denominator is the total number of people who were free of disease at the start of the time period. • This is defined as the ‘population at risk’. • Assume that the population at risk is followed over a specified time period, and that all those who are included at the beginning of the time period are counted at the end of the period. • This is called a closed population or a cohort. • For example, if a group of 100 people were studied for a year, and 25 had caught a cold at some point during the year, you would say that the risk of catching a cold was 0.25 or 25% in that year in that group.
  26. 26. When All People Are Not Observed for the Full Time period, Person-Time, or Units of Time When Each Person Is Observed • When different individuals are observed for different lengths of time, calculate an incidence rate (also called an incidence density), in which the denominator consists of the sum of the units of time that each individual was at risk and was observed. • This is called person-time and is often expressed in terms of person-months or person-years of observation.
  27. 27. • Let us consider person-years (py): • One person at risk who is observed for one year = one person-year. • One person at risk observed for 5 years = 5 person-years (py). • But 5 people at risk, each of whom is observed for only 1 year, also = 5 person-years.
  28. 28. • If people at risk are observed for different periods of time, the incidence rate is:
  29. 29. • Although it is most accurate to determine person-time on an individual basis, as was done in this study, this method is very time consuming and labor-intensive. • In much larger studies, where it might be difficult to measure the exact person-time for every individual in the study, the mid- period population can be used as an estimate for the total person-time at risk. • In this situation, the average population at the mid-point of the calendar period of interest is multiplied by the number of years over which the study took place.
  30. 30. • Figure: Hypothetical Disease Occurrence • Point prevalence rate at t1 = 4 / 10 • Point prevalence rate at t2 = 3 / 10 • Incidence cases between t1 and t2 = (4, 6, 7, 8) • Period prevalence = (Point prevalence t1 + Incidence cases) /10 = (4 + 4)/10 • Cumulative Incidence Rate for 2004 = (4) / (10-4) = 4/6
  31. 31. Relationship Between Prevalence and Incidence • This equation assumes that the population is in steady state (that is, inflow equals outflow) and that the incidence rate and duration do not change over time. P = I x D where , • P is prevalence (the proportion of the total population with the disease) • I is incidence rate • D is the average duration (or length of time) that an individual has the disease.
  32. 32. Comment?
  33. 33. Special Incidence rates • Attack rate or case rate • Secondary attack rate • Hospital admission rate Attack Rate or case rate Used only when limited exposure to a risk (during an epidemics) Reflects the extent of the epidemic. Attack Rate= No. of New cases of a specific d/s during a specified time x100 Total population at risk during the same interval
  34. 34. Secondary attack rate It is defined as the number of exposed persons developing the disease within the range of the incubation period following exposure to a primary case.
  35. 35. Uses of prevalence 1. Helps to estimate the magnitude of health or disease problems in the community 2. Helps to identify potential high risk population. 3. Useful projecting demands for medical services 4. Useful for administrative and planning purposes e.g. Hospital beds, Manpower needs, Rehabilitation facilities etc.
  36. 36. Uses of incidence rate Incidence rate is useful for taking action 1) to control disease & 2) For research into • Etiology and pathogenesis • Distribution of diseases • Effectiveness of preventive and therapeutic measures.
  37. 37. REVIEW QUESTIONS FOR CHAPTER 3 Q. A prevalence survey conducted from January 1 through December 31, 2012, identified 1,000 cases of schizophrenia in a city of 2 million persons. The incidence rate of schizophrenia in this population is 5/100,000 persons each year. What percent of the 1,000 cases were newly diagnosed in 2012?
  38. 38. • Q. Population of the city of Atlantis on March 30, 2012 = 183,000 • No. of new active cases of TB occurring between January 1 and June 30, 2012 = 26 • No. of active TB cases according to the city register on June 30, 2012 = 264
  39. 39. 6. The incidence rate of active cases of TB for the 6-month period was: a. 7 per 100,000 population b. 14 per 100,000 population c. 26 per 100,000 population d. 28 per 100,000 population e. 130 per 100,000 population
  40. 40. 7. The prevalence rate of active TB as of June 30, 2012, was: a. 14 per 100,000 population b. 130 per 100,000 population c. 144 per 100,000 population d. 264 per 100,000 population e. None of the above

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