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Leaders as change agents

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Leaders as change agents

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Leading change is not as easy as it sounds. This slide pack gives an overview of a presentation I gave to a group of front line manager at a regional hospital in Red Deer Alberta. Enjoy! Marlies

Leading change is not as easy as it sounds. This slide pack gives an overview of a presentation I gave to a group of front line manager at a regional hospital in Red Deer Alberta. Enjoy! Marlies

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Leaders as change agents

  1. 1. Leaders as Change Agents: Not as easy as it sounds @tweetvandijk
  2. 2. “The people who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world are the ones who do”
  3. 3. Source of image: Whatsthebigideascwartzy.blogspot.com
  4. 4. Most change programmes fail to deliver their objectives Source: McKinsey Performance Transformation Survey, 3000 respondents to global, multi-industry survey 70% 25% 5% Gets anywhere near achieving the change and delivering the benefits
  5. 5. Source: McKinsey Performance Transformation Survey, 3000 respondents to global, multi-industry survey 70% 25% 5% Delivers and sustains the change Most change programmes fail to deliver their objectives
  6. 6. What do you think the % is in healthcare? What are you working on right now that is about change?
  7. 7. @HelenBevan #QS2015
  8. 8. @HelenBevan #QS2015 Anatomical approach  Improving clinical systems  Seeking to reduce harm and reduce risk  Redesigning pathways  Standardising  Measuring
  9. 9. @HelenBevan #QS2015 Anatomical approach  Improving clinical systems  Seeking to reduce harm and reduce risk  Redesigning pathways  Standardising  Measuring Physiological approach The vitality and life-giving forces that enable the system and its people to develop, grow & change  creating higher purpose and deeper meaning  Leading through values  building commitment  creating hope and optimism about the future  calling to action
  10. 10. @HelenBevan #QS2015 Anatomical approach  Improving clinical systems  Seeking to reduce harm and reduce risk  Redesigning pathways  Standardising  Measuring Physiological approach The vitality and life-giving forces that enable the system and its people to develop, grow & change  creating higher purpose and deeper meaning  Leading through values  building commitment  creating hope and optimism about the future  calling to action It’s all about energy!
  11. 11. Leading change in a new era Dominant approach Emerging direction Most healthcare transformation efforts are driven from this side
  12. 12. @HelenBevan #QS2015 The reality “What the leader cares about (and typically bases at least 80% of his or her message to others on) does not tap into roughly 80% of the workforce’s primary motivators for putting extra energy into the change programme” Scott Keller and Carolyn Aiken (2009) The Inconvenient Truth about Change Management Source of image: swedenbourg-openlearning.org.uk
  13. 13. @HelenBevan #QS2015 Leaders ask their staff to be ready for change, but do not engage enough in sensemaking........ Sensemaking is not done via marketing...or slogans but by emotional connection with employees Ron Weil
  14. 14. @tweetvandijk
  15. 15. Starts on the fringe (at the edge) Starts with the activists Gary Hamel always
  16. 16. Troublemaker Vs Radical (Change Agent) “Troublemaker” “Radical” Break Rules Change Rules Complain Create Assertions Questions Me-Focused Mission-Focused Anger Passion Pessimist Optimist Energy-Sapping Energy-Generating Alienate Attract Problems Possibilities Worry That Wonder If Doubt Believe Social Loner Social Source: Lois Kelly, Organizational Radicals, Foghound Study
  17. 17. Reflection • What are your insights around “rebels” and “troublemakers”? • What moves people from being “rebel” to “troublemaker”?
  18. 18. @tweetvandijk
  19. 19. @tweetvandijk
  20. 20. People who are highly connected have twice as much power to influence change as people with hierarchical power Leandro Herrero http://t.co/Du6zCbrDBC
  21. 21. @tweetvandijk
  22. 22. @tweetvandijk
  23. 23. C @tweetvandijk
  24. 24. @tweetvandijk
  25. 25. @tweetvandijk
  26. 26. Research from the sales industry: How many NOs should we be seeking to get? • 2% of sales are made on the first contact • 3% of sales are made on the second contact • 5% of sales are made on the third contact • 10% of sales are made on the fourth contact • 80% of sales are made on the fifth to twelfth contact Source: http://www.slideshare.net/bryandaly/go-for-no
  27. 27. Source: http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWaltz/gfn-slidesharegfnhandling-rejectionpositively
  28. 28. Source: http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWaltz/gfn-slidesharegfnhandling-rejectionpositively
  29. 29. Source: http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWaltz/gfn-slidesharegfnhandling-rejectionpositively
  30. 30. Source: http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWaltz/gfn-slidesharegfnhandling-rejectionpositively
  31. 31. Source: http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWaltz/gfn-slidesharegfnhandling-rejectionpositively Make it a personal PERFORMANCE target.
  32. 32. Source: http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWaltz/gfn-slidesharegfnhandling-rejectionpositively
  33. 33. @tweetvandijk
  34. 34. What are change initiative are you working on right now? How do you sell it to people?
  35. 35. @tweetvandijk
  36. 36. Effective framing: what do we need to do? 1. Tell a story 2. Make it personal 3. Be authentic 4. Create a sense of “us” (and be clear who the “us” is) 5. Build in a call for urgent action Source of image: woccdoc.org
  37. 37. Which do you like better? 1. Our infection rates are higher than they should be. We have new clinical guidelines. Let’s work together to implement them! 2. You are the one at the bedside. You know what works and what doesn’t. How can we tackle our infection rates? 3. Remember Mrs. Smith. She fully recovered from C- diff that she picked up on our unit. Just like you, I want to protect more of the chronic elderly. What do you think we can do?
  38. 38. What motivates people? • Impact on Society (building community) • Impact on Customer (patients and families) • Impact on Organization • Impact on Team (work environment) • Impact on me (development or bonus)
  39. 39. What are the traits of “inspirational” leaders? -chat-
  40. 40. Viral Change, Leandro Herrero
  41. 41. https://www.youtube.com/watc h?v=CNhYbJbqg-Y
  42. 42. @HCRcentral
  43. 43. Marlies van Dijk Provincial Implementation Lead, Innovation Quality and Healthcare Improvement Alberta Health Services marlies.vandijk@albertahealthservices.ca @tweetvandijk @HCRcentral @ChangeDayAB
  44. 44. “Throw your own pebble - a simple commitment to make an act of improvement however small - into the pond of your world and those you care for. And know that its effects will join with those of others who do the same, the rings of change extending far and wide. Imagine what we could do.” Jon Popowich
  45. 45. Pledge here www.ChangeDayAB.ca

Notes de l'éditeur

  • Colleen
  • opinion profoundly at odds with what is generally accepted.
  • Yet, what happens to radicals??????????

    Let’s think about Heretics….Heresy is any provocative belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs. A heretic is a proponent of such claims or beliefs.[1]

    The end results for people who challenge established ideas/conventions isn’t always pretty!
  • Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis[Note 1] (July 1, 1818 – August 13, 1865)

    a Hungarian physician known as an early pioneer of antiseptic procedures.
    Described as the "savior of mothers", Semmelweis discovered that the incidence of puerperal fever could be drastically cut by the use of hand disinfection in obstetrical clinics. Puerperal fever was common in mid-19th-century hospitals and often fatal, with mortality at 10%–35%. Semmelweis proposed the practice of washing with chlorinated lime solutions in 1847 while working in Vienna General Hospital's First Obstetrical Clinic, where doctors' wards had three times the mortality of midwives' wards.[3] He published a book of his findings in Etiology, Concept and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever.
    Despite various publications of results where hand-washing reduced mortality to below 1%, Semmelweis's observations conflicted with the established scientific and medical opinions of the time and his ideas were rejected by the medical community.
    Some doctors were offended at the suggestion that they should wash their hands and Semmelweis could offer no acceptable scientific explanation for his findings. Semmelweis's practice earned widespread acceptance only years after his death, when Louis Pasteur confirmed the germ theory and Joseph Lister, acting on the French microbiologist's research, practiced and operated, using hygienic methods, with great success.
    In 1865, Semmelweis was committed to an asylum, where he died at age 47 after being beaten by the guards, only 14 days after he was committed.
  • On December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, Parks refused to obey bus driver James F. Blake's order that she give up her seat in the colored section to a white passenger, after the white section was filled. Parks was not the first person to resist bus segregation. Others had taken similar steps, including Irene Morgan in 1946, Sarah Louise Keys in 1955, and the members of the Browder v. Gayle lawsuit (Claudette Colvin, Aurelia Browder, Susie McDonald, and Mary Louise Smith) were arrested months before Parks. NAACP organizers believed that Parks was the best candidate for seeing through a court challenge after her arrest for civil disobedience in violating Alabama segregation laws though eventually her case became bogged down in the state courts.[2][3]
    Parks' act of defiance and the Montgomery Bus Boycott became important symbols of the modern Civil Rights Movement. She became an international icon of resistance to racial segregation. She organized and collaborated with civil rights leaders, including Edgar Nixon, president of the local chapter of the NAACP; and Martin Luther King, Jr., a new minister in town who gained national prominence in the civil rights movement.
  • Steve Jobs challenged things to be different
    Had a vision for a different world
    Can we imagine a world right now with out our iPads, iMacs, iPhones, Apple TV?

    “The ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world are the ones who do” - Jack Kerouac
  • I was at a national organization in Canada and I challenged internal policies and was not towing the party line.

    I ended up voicing my concerns in an e-mail and I was reported to the CEO. Which led to a “letter on my file” – not sure if you
    have heard of that – I hadn’t … I was deeply offended – but pinned it on my office wall to show people that this was a feather
    In my cap vs. a punishment.

    I knew I had to leave.
  • How do you form teams

    New ventures – build a great team vs. perfecting an idea. Success is dependent on the quality of the idea – but deeply dependent of the ability of the team to execute.

    What if you have no control over the team?

    E’s become great relationship and engagement manager. To understand the ability of good team members. Those can be used to leverage the sense of co-ownership

    See the sense of co-ownership.

    They have ability to pull others along with them.
  • Live in a state of “manage discomfort’ – there might be an unease as they are entrepeneurs – or even to find space to be entrepreneurial

    Act entrepreurial outside of their job description. “capable of squeezing through the smallest of opportunity to build evidence that my idea is good”

    Official job title “change agent” – operate off the org chart – seek out places in nook and crannies in the organzation -then develop truth of the value of their idea

    Octopus – she says I can squeeze through the smallest opportunity to get my idea out there – or it would get killed

    Another guy: project manager – he showed value through other side projects and through a community of practice. Although his company thought he should do that through his day job

    Day it is broken out – one hour meetings not condusive to entrepreneurial thinking.

    Meeting culture – what can happen and not happen. Entrepreneurs get bigger blocks of time to do creative work

    Hour long meetings – not contusive to entrepreneurial behaviour. They look for ways to structure their days differently – larger blocs of time.

    An organization can have strong or weak entrepreneurial cultures

  • Ppt “what and how” – story telling – powerful to mobilize others to act. Through stories. Through a new outcome or new reality.

    Notice that there is meager support to how to develop good story telling. Entrepreuners know this skill – through trial and error.

    Two practices 1) recognize what the language gap is between stakeholders – ie,., trying telling stories about new idea at several levels – really needed to understand the concept the idea – she thought everyone was on the same page but she was missing the mark. 2)technique: progressive disclosure (from interaction and design field)– essence: sequencing information and action across several groups of people. Start with small disclosure and reveal more and more. Ie,. Progressively disclosed more in his story – and added on that as people were caught up. New idea later broadly socialized to get resources.

    Important element piece


  • How do you learn to become an entreprenuer inside.

    Build 2 knowledge

    Domain knowledge: expertise in their industry in their product or field
    Organizational knowledge: “the know how” how an organization works. Tacid experiential experience on how an org works. Reading the landscape. Thinking like an anthrapologist – being able to learn about the history but respond to information coming in.

    A process of de- education. Unlearning prior behaviours that does not serve an E. If you a disengaged employee you are building habits that don’t serve you as an E. De educate yourself on perfectionism – does not serve you well if you are a E. Holding on to an idea to tightly. Working towards performance evaluation. Executing ideas of others. Build into habits – and other E muscles will atrophy.

    Those will atrophy other E muscles – you need to de-learning curve. Unlearn of things so you can build different habits.


  • Experimentation

    Wired for experimentation but the orgs they work for are not. Not surprising. Experimentation is hard to operationalize and support.

    Following rules and operating procedures – they do not see it as killing experimentation.

    Experimentation = google 20% of the time. First steps for experimentation is overcoming self doubt – getting challenged all the time can be tiring. Trick is figuring out what idea is a good one and which one is not.

    E are good at creative conflict as a way to experiment. Creative Conflict: Opposition to help shape opportunities – different from opposition that is resistant to change.

    Example: VP Brings early ideas to them – reiterate shape ideas

    E sees both success and failure as a learning opportunity. Uncomfortable if they sit on a success too long. They know someone will come along and challenge it.



  • How can we link ideas for change/improvements….
  • Poll.

    Our infection rates are higher than they should be. We have new clinical guidelines. Let’s work together to implement them!
    You are the one at the bedside. You know what works and what doesn’t. How can we tackle our infection rates?
    Remember Mrs. Smith. She fully recovered from C-diff that she picked up on our unit. Just like you, I want to protect more of the chronic elderly. What do you think we can do?


    Pick 1,2,3 or none.
  • There is an exciting movement that is happening in Alberta and we are thrilled to be a part of it.
     
    It’s called Change Day! 
     
    Do you have great ideas but not sure you can implement them?  Our healthcare system is not perfect and this is your chance to be part of making it better.

    Change Day is a movement where you can pledge to improve your own health or the healthcare system.
     
    This is the time to unleash all of your ideas and creativity, make a pledge, and become a change day hero. Can you imagine what an impact we could have if every employee in AHS made a pledge?

    Change Day is a worldwide movement that started in the UK and has spread to countries across the globe with huge involvement from healthcare providers and the public.  

    Change Day AB is sponsored by the Health Quality Network which represents a diverse group of health organizations.    
  • The announcement is happening on Monday at the Quality Summit in Edmonton.

    The website will be live on Monday o start collecting pledges. Check out the video

    What will happen?

    You can make a pledge at any time.   On April 4, 2016 we will unite as Change Day heroes, tally the pledges, have a bash and celebrate!
    Pledges are personal commitments to change.  Check out the website to see what other people are pledging.

    The kick-off is today at the Quality Summit in Edmonton with 400 people.

    Check out the twitter feed at #ChangeDayAB

    Pledge here
    www.ChangeDayAB.ca

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