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Presentation1 1207.pptx

  1. 1. Anti-Fungal activity and mycotoxin inhibitory efficacy of different essential oils based nanoemulsion under In-vitro and In-vivo tests Presenter: Muhammad Imran Student ID: 8110039004 Advisor: Professor Dr. Yao-Tung Lin December 7th, 2022
  2. 2. Introduction Objective of the study Materials and Methods Results and Discussion Conclusions 1 2 3 4 5 Outline
  3. 3. Introduction Food waste • High cost • High energy input • Short self-live • Environmental risk Traditional food preservation techniques • Drying • Pickling • Salting • Canning • Refrigerating • Use of chemical preservatives Disadvantages  1.3 billion tonnes – global food waste yearly; • Food spoilage • Food safety (essential oils as nanoemulsion) Source: Google image 4
  4. 4. Fig 1. Particle size distribution (A) and microstructure (B,C) of limonin-loaded eugenol nanoemulsion. The mean particle size was 245.7 nm. Scale bar, 10 µm Characterization of nanoemulsion (LI et al., 2021) 6
  5. 5. Figure 2. Optical microscopy of the spore germination after treatment with water (CK), eugenol nanoemulsion (EG), and limonin-loaded eugenol emulsion (EGL). Scale in the graph, 20 µm. Anti-fungal activity (Inhibition of Spore Germination) 7 (LI et al., 2021)
  6. 6. Figure 3. Colony diameters of P. italium after incubation for 3–7 d after different treatments Anti-fungal activity (Inhibition of Mycelial growth) 9 (LI et al., 2021)
  7. 7. Figure 4. Morphology of the mycelia (A–C) and conidia (D–F) of P. italicum, as observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), after treatment with water (A,D), 160 μg/mL EG nanoemulsion (B,E), and 160 μg/mL EGL nanoemulsion (C,F). Scale bar, 10 μm for mycelia and 1 μm for spore. Micromorphological analysis by SEM 10 (LI et al., 2021)
  8. 8. Figure 5. Influence of the nanoemulsion (at a eugenol concentration of 160 µg/mL) on the extracellular conductivity (A), lipid peroxidation (B), leakage of nucleic acid (C), and protein (D) of P. italicum. Data are shown as mean ± SD from three replication and different letter represent a significant difference p < 0.05). Influence of Nanoemulsions on the Cell Membrane Permeability - Extracellular Conductivity 11 (LI et al., 2021)
  9. 9. • Limonin-loaded eugenol nanoemulsion effectively inhibited the occurrence of citrus blue mold infection caused by P. italicum spores. • Limonin loaded eugenol nanoemulsion, could be considered as an alternative fungicide to inhibit blue mold in citrus fruits. Conclusion
  10. 10. Figure 3. Colony diameters of P. italium after incubation for 3–7 d after different treatments . (Wan et al., 2021) 13 In vitro antifungal activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil nanoemulsion
  11. 11. Fig. 1. The Zeta potential of Thymus vulgaris Essential Oil Characterization of TV EO-NEs (Moazeni et al., 2021) 14
  12. 12. Fig. 2. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of TVL-NE. Characterization of TV EO-NEs 15 (Moazeni et al., 2021)
  13. 13. Fig. 3. The cytotoxicity activities of different concentrations of both TV EOs and TV EO-NEs on Human Caucasian fetal foreskin fibroblast (HFFF2) cells: (a) 24 h and (b) 48 h. Cytotoxicity Effects 16 (Moazeni et al., 2021)
  14. 14. Conclusion (Wan et al., 2021) 17 • The study also highlighted that TV EO-NE is a promising treatment of cutaneous mycoses especially when the etiological agents are resistant to conventional antifungal drugs. • It is highly recommended to investigate the exact mechanism of action of the antifungal activity of TV EO- NE regarding cellular/ molecular approaches.
  15. 15. . (Wan et al., 2021) 18 Antifungal activity, mycotoxin inhibitory efficacy, and mode of action of hop essential oil nanoemulsion against Fusarium graminearum
  16. 16. Physical stability of hop essential oil-in-water nanoemulsions (Jiang et al., 2022) 19 Fig. 1. (A) Impact of medium chain triglycerides (MCT) content in total oil phase (5 wt%) on mean particle diameter of hop essential oil-in-water (HEO) nanoemulsion (0.5 wt% of tween 80 and 94.5 wt% of 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0; average particle size of various wt% of MCT in oil phase with different lowercase letters were significantly different from each other at p < 0.05); (B) storage stability of HEO nanoemulsion over a course of 7 days storage time at 25 ℃ (size values under various days with different lowercase letters were significantly different from each other at p < 0.05); and (C) particle size distribution of HEO nanoemulsion at the selected storage time.
  17. 17. Fig. 2. (A) Effect of hop essential oil concentration in nanoemulsion on mycelial growth inhibition rate of F. graminearum 10–124-1 and F. graminearum 10–125-1 (different lowercase letters indicate statistically significant intraspecies differences at p < 0.05); and (B) scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation of F. graminearum hyphae treated by water (control) and HEO nanoemulsion Anti-fungal - Mycelial growth inhibition rate (MGI) 20 (Jiang et al., 2022)
  18. 18. Fig. 3. (A) Effect of hop essential oil concentration in nanoemulsion on spore germination inhibition rate of F. graminearum 10–124-1 and F. graminearum 10–125-1 (different lowercase letters indicate statistically significant intraspecies differences at p < 0.05); and (B) scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation of F. graminearum spores treated by water (control) and HEO nanoemulsion. Spore Germination Inhibition 21 (Jiang et al., 2022)
  19. 19. Fig. 4. Inhibition of mycotoxins production in F. graminearum 10–124-1 and F. graminearum 10–125-1 inoculated rice culture treated by HEO nanoemulsion for 5 days of incubation (water treatment was used as control; different lowercase letters indicate statistically significant intraspecies differences at p < 0.05; n.d. denoting not detected). The effect of hop essential oil-in-water nanoemulsions on mycotoxin production 22 (Jiang et al., 2022)
  20. 20. Fig. 5. (A) Effect of HEO nanoemulsion on total lipid content of outer cell membrane of F. graminearum isolates. (different lowercase letters indicate statistically significant intraspecies differences at p < 0.05); and (B) confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images of outer cell membrane of F. graminearum isolates after incubation for 10 h in potato dextrose broth (chitin was stained by calcofluor white dye and shown in blue color). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.) Antifungal mode of action of hop essential oil-in-water nanoemulsions 3.5.1. Total lipid content 23 (Jiang et al., 2022)
  21. 21. Fig. 6. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images of cytoplasmic membrane of F. graminearum isolates simultaneously stained by fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide after incubation for 10 h in potato dextrose broth. Permeability of cytoplasmic membrane 24 (Jiang et al., 2022)
  22. 22. Conclusions 25 (Jiang et al., 2022) • Regarding the antifungal activity, HEO nanoemulsion could inhibit the mycelial growth and spore germination of the two chemotypes F. graminearum isolates. • In addition to their antifungal activity, HEO also displayed the capability to completely hinder biosynthesis of Fusarium mycotoxin. • HEO-in-water nanoemulsion acts as natural antifungal and detoxifying agents in the malting and food industry.

Notes de l'éditeur

  • The antifungal mechanism was related to the inhibition of fungal spore germination and destruction of the cell membrane that caused leakage of intracellular proteins and nucleic acids.
  • No change to appearance and mean droplet diameter of thyme oil NE stabilized.
    BSA and Q N are highly stabilized, by displaying monomodal size distribution.
    Emulsion Stabilize by electrostatic repulsion.
    Lysolecithin highly unstable on day 1 or 2. phase separation.
  • by altering the total lipid, chitin content in outer cell membrane, as well as impairing cytoplasmic membrane permeability.
    Including DON, 3ADON, and 15ADON in rice culture upon the addition of 750 μg HEO per g of rice.
    Because of the diverse genetic and biological variations of the two chemotypes of F. graminearum isolates, 15ADON chemotype of F. graminearum isolate 10–124-1 had a higher sensitive response to HEO nanoemulsion when compared to 3ADON chemotype of F. graminearum isolate 10–125-1

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