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MIL LESSON 5.pptx

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MIL LESSON 5.pptx

  1. 1. LESSON 5
  2. 2. LEARNING COMPETENCIES •The learners compare potential sources of media and information. •Interview an elder from the community regarding indigenous media and information resource.
  3. 3. SPECIFIC LEARNING OBJECTIVES •Demonstrate an ability to examine and compare information from various sources in order to evaluate its reliability, accuracy, authority, timeliness, and bias •Determine the accuracy, reliability and value of information by questioning the source of data, limitations of the information gathering tools or strategies, and the rationale of the conclusions
  4. 4. THINK PAIR ACTIVITY GUIDE QUESTIONS •Why does it matter to know if Wikipedia’s content is credible? •Aside from Wikipedia, what other sources of information do you turn to whenever you want to know about something? •What is the implication and the effect if a given source of information is unreliable?
  5. 5. LET’S PLAY SENTENCE CHARADES! • Form a group with 4 members • One member of the group will pick a piece of paper that contains an action which he/she will silently perform in front of the second member. • Second member of the group will be asked to observe and write in specific detail about the action being performed by the first member. This includes his observations as well as his/her understanding of the action being performed. • After the second member has finished documenting the action being performed by the first member, he/she will give the document to the 3rd and 4th member. Then, the 3rd and 4th member writes a summary based on the document provided by the 2nd member. • Each group will be doing this in front of the class while other groups are observing.
  6. 6. 3 TYPES OF INFORMATION SOURCES PRIMARY SOURCE •Records of events or evidence as they are first described or actually happened without any interpretation or commentary. •It is information that is shown for the first time or original materials on which other research is based. •Primary sources display original thinking, report on new discoveries, or share fresh information. https://www.crk.umn.edu/library/primary-secondary-and-tertiary-sources
  7. 7. 3 TYPES OF INFORMATION SOURCES SECONDARY SOURCE •These sources offer an analysis or restatement of primary sources. •They often try to describe or explain primary sources. They tend to be works which summarize, interpret, reorganize, or otherwise provide an added value to a primary source. https://www.crk.umn.edu/library/primary-secondary-and-tertiary-sources
  8. 8. 3 TYPES OF INFORMATION SOURCES TERTIARY SOURCE •These are sources that index, abstract, organize, compile, or digest other sources. •Some reference materials and textbooks are considered tertiary sources when their chief purpose is to list, summarize or simply repackage ideas or other information. •Usually not credited to a particular author. https://www.crk.umn.edu/library/primary-secondary-and-tertiary-sources
  9. 9. 1. What is the motto of this Educational Institution? 2. What team is the current winner of NBA Finals? 3. Who among in the class are born in the month of September? 4. What is the first thing that you put in the pan when cooking Adobo? THE QUESTIONNAIRE
  10. 10. INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE INDIGENOUS MEDIA • Owned, controlled, and managed by indigenous people. • Used to develop and produced culturally appropriate information in the languages understood by the community. CHARACTERISTICS: • Oral tradition of communication. • Stored information in memories. • Information exchange is face-to-face. • Information is limited within the border of the community.
  11. 11. INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE ORAL TRADITION •Form of narration where elders recount their culture to their children and grandchildren. •Avenue for communal experiences as elders share their stories and recall memorable experiences with their parents and grandparents as well.
  12. 12. INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE ORAL TRADITION (EXAMPLES) LEGENDS (Alamat) • Fiction which tells about the origin of something FOLKTALE (Kuwentong Bayan) • Narration about the characteristics of the time and place which the story is told. EPIC (Epiko) • Heroic adventure of the main characters that sometimes possesses extraordinary powers. MYTHOLOGY • Stories tells lives of mortals that are influence by the gods.
  13. 13. LEGENDS
  14. 14. FOLKTALE SI MARIA MAPANGARAP http://panitikangpnoy.blogspot.com/p/mga-kwentong-bayan-folktales.html
  15. 15. EPIC BIAG NI LAM-ANG https://philippineculturaleducation.com.ph/lam-ang-hero-of-the-epic-biag-ni-lam-ang-of-the-ilocano/
  16. 16. MYTHOLOGY http://mariitphilippines.blogspot.com/2014/05/ancient-gods-and-goddess-of-philippines.html
  17. 17. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpF5EZy9ZOY&t=50s
  18. 18. LIBRARY A building or room containing collections of books, periodicals, and sometimes films and recorded music for people to read, borrow, or refer to.
  19. 19. DIGITAL LIBRARY •A digital repository, or digital collection, is an online database of digital objects that can include text, still images, audio, video, or other digital media formats.
  20. 20. DIGITAL LIBRARY •A digital repository, or digital collection, is an online database of digital objects that can include text, still images, audio, video, or other digital media formats. https://www.wdl.org/en/
  21. 21. DIGITAL LIBRARY •A digital repository, or digital collection, is an online database of digital objects that can include text, still images, audio, video, or other digital media formats. http://www.unesco-ci.org/cgi-bin/portals/libraries/page.cgi?d=1
  22. 22. LIBRARY CLASSIFICATION •ACADEMIC •PUBLIC •SCHOOL •SPECIAL
  23. 23. SKILLS IN ACCESSING INFORMATION FROM LIBRARIES Access tool to use Information being accessed may be classified The depth of details required--some libraries provide only an abstract of the topic More detailed information might require membership or some conformity to set rules of the source (ex databases).
  24. 24. CHARACTERISTICS OF LIBRARIES IN TERMS OF RELIABILITY, ACCURACY AND VALUE Libraries of published books are often considered highly reliable, accurate, and valuable. Books and documents from dominant sources are often peer reviewed. ISSN or ISBN registration ensures that standards were followed in producing these materials.
  25. 25. MUSEUM An institution that cares for (conserves) a collection of artifacts and other objects of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific importance.
  26. 26. TYPES OF MUSEUM ARCHAEOLOGY MUSEUMS. They display archeological artifacts. ART MUSEUMS. Also known as art galleries. They are spaces for showing art objects, most commonly visual art objects as paintings, sculpture, photography, illustrations, drawings, ceramics or metalwork. ENCYCLOPEDIC MUSEUMS. They are usually large institutions and they offer visitors a wide variety of information on many themes, both local and global.
  27. 27. TYPES OF MUSEUM HISTORIC HOUSE MUSEUMS. A house or a building turned into a museum for a variety of reasons, most commonly because the person that lived in it was important or something important happened in it. HISTORY MUSEUMS. They collect objects and artifacts that tell a chronological story about particular locality. LIVING HISTORY MUSEUMS. Type of a museum in which historic events are performed by actors to immerse a viewer and show how certain events looked like or how some crafts were performed because there is no other way to see them now because they are obsolete.
  28. 28. TYPES OF MUSEUM MARITIME MUSEUMS. Specialized museums for displaying maritime history, culture or archaeology. Show and educate the public about humanity's maritime past. MILITARY AND WAR MUSEUMS. Museums specialized in military histories. Usually organized from a point of view of a one nation and conflicts in which that country has taken part.
  29. 29. TYPES OF MUSEUM MOBILE MUSEUMS. Museums that have no specific strict place of exhibiting. They could be exhibited from a vehicle or they could move from museum to museum as guests. NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUMS. Usually display objects from nature like stuffed animals or pressed plants. They educate about natural history, dinosaurs, zoology, oceanography, anthropology, evolution, environmental issues, and more. OPEN-AIR MUSEUMS. Characteristic for exhibiting outdoors. Exhibitions consist of buildings that recreate architecture from the past.
  30. 30. TYPES OF MUSEUM POP-UP MUSEUMS. Nontraditional museum institutions. Made to last short and often relying on visitors to provide museum objects and labels while professionals or institution only provide theme. SCIENCE MUSEUMS. Specialized for science and history of science. In the beginning they were static displays of objects but now they are made so the visitors can participate and that way better learn about different branches of science.
  31. 31. ARCHIVES •Accumulation of historical records or the physical place they are located. •Contain primary source documents that have accumulated over the course of an individual or organization's lifetime, and are kept to show the function of that person or organization.
  32. 32. INTERNET The global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies.
  33. 33. REALITIES OF INTERNET CLICKBAIT A link that contains content whose main purpose is to attract attention and encourage visitors to click on the link of a particular web page. CONSPIRACY THEORY A theory that explains an event or set of circumstances as a result of a secret plot usually powerful conspirators.
  34. 34. REALITIES OF INTERNET SATIRE A humorous way of criticizing people or ideas to show that they have faults or are wrong, or a piece of writing or play that uses this style. PROPAGANDA The spreading of ideas, information, or rumor for the purpose of helping or injuring an institution, a cause or a person.
  35. 35. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING MEDIA AND INFORMATION SOURCES RELIABILITY OF INFORMATION •Information is said to be reliable if it can be verified and evaluated. •Others refer to the trustworthiness of the source in evaluating the reliability of information.
  36. 36. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING MEDIA AND INFORMATION SOURCES ACCURACY OF INFORMATION •Accuracy refers to the closeness of the report to the actual data. •Measurement of accuracy varies, depending on the type of information being evaluated.
  37. 37. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING MEDIA AND INFORMATION SOURCES VALUE OF INFORMATION •Information is said to be of value if it aids the user in making or improving decisions.
  38. 38. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING MEDIA AND INFORMATION SOURCES AUTHORITY OF THE SOURCE •Much of the information we gather daily do not come from a primary source but are passed on through secondary sources such as writers, reporters, and the like. •Sources with an established expertise on the subject matter are considered as having sound authority on the subject.
  39. 39. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING MEDIA AND INFORMATION SOURCES TIMELINESS •Reliability, accuracy, and value of information may vary based on the time it was produced or acquired. •While a piece of information may have been found accurate, reliable, and valuable during the time it was produced, it may become irrelevant and inaccurate with the passing of time (thus making it less valuable).
  40. 40. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING MEDIA AND INFORMATION SOURCES
  41. 41. SKILL IN DETERMINING THE RELIABILITY OF INFORMATION a. Check the author b. Check the date of publication or of update c. Check for citations. d. Check the domain or owner of the site or page. e. Check the site design and the writing style.
  42. 42. SKILLS IN DETERMINING ACCURATE INFORMATION a. Look for facts. b. Cross-reference with other sources to check for consistency. c. Determine the reason for writing and publishing the information. d. Check for advertising.
  43. 43. ALTERNATIVE MEDIA •Current popular alternative media •Rise of alternative media and information. •Other alternative forms of communication and distribution have become popular.

Notes de l'éditeur

  • Ask the class to first answer the guide questions individually. Afterwards, they share their answers/ideas to their partner.
  • Which of the 3 individuals would be considered “most reliable” in terms of the assigned action for the group? Why?
  • Examples of primary sources:  Theses, dissertations, scholarly journal articles (research based), some government reports, symposia and conference proceedings, original artwork, poems, photographs, speeches, letters, memos, personal narratives, diaries, interviews, autobiographies, and correspondence.
  • Examples of Secondary Sources:  Textbooks, edited works, books and articles that interpret or review research works, histories, biographies, literary criticism and interpretation, reviews of law and legislation, political analyses and commentaries.
  • Examples of Tertiary Sources:  Dictionaries/encyclopedias (may also be secondary), almanacs, fact books, Wikipedia, bibliographies (may also be secondary), directories, guidebooks, manuals, handbooks, and textbooks (may be secondary), indexing and abstracting sources.
  • Site where do they get the source?
    What are the differences between each source of Information?
    What limitation(s) does each source have?
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.

    Indegenous - natives
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.
  • Alamat ng Bulkang Mayon
  • The legend of Daragang Magayon
  • Have this discussion at the library, and should include a live demonstration on the skills to be discussed. A librarian may be of assistance to help discuss some of the topics.
    Note that there are digital forms of libraries, as well as tools used for these digital libraries.
  • In addition to storing content, digital libraries provide means for organizing, searching, and retrieving the content contained in the collection.
  • In addition to storing content, digital libraries provide means for organizing, searching, and retrieving the content contained in the collection.
  • In addition to storing content, digital libraries provide means for organizing, searching, and retrieving the content contained in the collection.
  • Academic libraries serve colleges and universities
    Public libraries serve cities and towns of all types
    School libraries serve students from Kindergarten to grade 12
    Special libraries are in specialized environments, such as hospitals, corporations, museums, the military, private business, and the government.
  • Academic libraries serve colleges and universities
    Public libraries serve cities and towns of all types
    School libraries serve students from Kindergarten to grade 12
    Special libraries are in specialized environments, such as hospitals, corporations, museums, the military, private business, and the government.
  • Academic libraries serve colleges and universities
    Public libraries serve cities and towns of all types
    School libraries serve students from Kindergarten to grade 12
    Special libraries are in specialized environments, such as hospitals, corporations, museums, the military, private business, and the government.
  • Due to the wealth of information in a library, it is important to know the following:
  • The ISSN is the international standardized code which identifies all serials, journals, magazines, periodicals irrespective of their medium (print or electronic) ...
    An ISBN is an International Standard Book Number. ISBNs were 10 digits in length up to the end of 
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.
  • ARCHAEOLOGY MUSEUMS. 
  • ART MUSEUMS
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.
  • HISTORIC HOUSE MUSEUMS
  • HISTORY MUSEUMS. 
  • LIVING HISTORY MUSEUMS
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.
  • MARITIME MUSEUMS
  • MILITARY AND WAR MUSEUMS
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.
  • NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUMS
  • OPEN-AIR MUSEUMS.  - Goreme - open air museum, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.
  • POP-UP MUSEUMS. 
    Happy Place - a Los Angeles pop up museum for happy people
  • SCIENCE MUSEUMS
  • C. These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.
  • The Internet (portmanteau of interconnected network)

    a word blending the sounds and combining the meanings of two others, for example motel (from ‘motor’ and ‘hotel’) or brunch (from ‘breakfast’ and ‘lunch’).
  • CLICKBAIT
  • CONSPIRACY THEORY
  • CLICKBAIT
  • SATIRE
  • PROPAGANDA
  • Forecasts are said to be accurate if the report is similar to the actual data.
    Financial information is considered accurate if the values are correct, properly classified, and presented
  • Other information may be timeless, proven to be the same in reliability, accuracy, and value throughout history.
  • Conclude by reminding the learners that while it may be difficult to fully determine the reliability, accuracy, value, and timeliness of any information, as well as the authority of the source, literacy in media and information benefits from the development of these skills.
  • The author’s willingness to be identified is a good indication of reliability.
    While the information may be true, it may not be reliable if it is outdated and may have lost relevance.
    Reliable authors have the discipline of citing sources of their information.
    The domains .edu and .gov are reserved for academic institutions and the government respectively. Information from such sites are presented with caution and are usually well-grounded. Site owners may have an agenda that affects the manner by which information is presented.
    Credible sources take time to make their information accessible and easy to comprehend.
  • C. Check if the author is objective or leaning heavily on a certain point of view.
    D. Advertisers may use related information to market their product.
  • These include social media, blogs, and flash mob performances. These alternative forms provide greater freedom and power to ordinary individuals and are a quicker way of distributing information. The downside is that a lot of the information being passed around is biased and inaccurate.

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