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TALIS 2018 - What do teachers tell us about their work and what matters to them?

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Do teachers spend more time on actual teaching and learning in a typical lesson compared to previous years? Do they feel prepared to teach when they start teaching? What sort of continuous professional development programmes do they participate in and how does it impact their practice? This report looks first at how teachers apply their knowledge and skills in the classroom in the form of teaching practices, with an accompanying assessment of the demographic makeup of those classrooms and the school climate to provide context on learning environments. The volume then assesses the ways in which teachers acquired their knowledge and skills during their early education and training, as well as the steps they take to develop them through continuous professional development over the course of their career. Based on the voice of teachers and school leaders, the report offers a series of policy orientations to help strengthen the knowledge and skills of the teaching workforce to support its professionalism.The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) is the largest international survey asking teachers and school leaders about their working conditions and learning environments, and provides a barometer of the profession every five years. Results from the 2018 cycle explore and examine the various dimensions of teacher and school leader professionalism across education systems.

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TALIS 2018 - What do teachers tell us about their work and what matters to them?

  1. 1. WHAT DO TEACHERS TELL US ABOUT THEIR WORK AND WHAT MATTERS TO THEM ? Andreas Schleicher, London, 19 June 2019
  2. 2. WHO ARE THE TEACHERS ?
  3. 3. Making a difference…
  4. 4. Teachers joined the profession to… 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Teaching allowed me to influence the development of children and young people Teaching allowed me to provide a contribution to society Teaching allowed me to benefit the socially disadvantaged Teaching was a secure job Teaching provided a reliable income The teaching schedule fit with responsibilities in my personal life Teaching offered a steady career path Teaching allowed me to influence the… Percentage of teachers who report that the following elements were of "moderate" or "high" importance in becoming a teacher % Fig I.4.1
  5. 5. Teachers joined the profession to… 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Teaching allowed me to influence the development of children and young people Teaching allowed me to provide a contribution to society Teaching allowed me to benefit the socially disadvantaged Teaching was a secure job Teaching provided a reliable income The teaching schedule fit with responsibilities in my personal life Teaching offered a steady career path Teaching allowed me to influence the… Percentage of teachers who report that the following elements were of "moderate" or "high" importance in becoming a teacher % Fig I.4.1 In nearly all countries teachers with higher values on the social utility index report greater commitment and tend to participate more in professional development activities after controlling for teachers’ characteristics.
  6. 6. A first choice ?
  7. 7. 0 20 40 60 80 100 VietNam Georgia Shanghai(China) Portugal SaudiArabia Slovenia Japan Korea Lithuania Hungary UnitedArabEmirates Kazakhstan Romania Latvia Flemish(Belgium) Russia Bulgaria Singapore Malta France Belgium CzechRepublic Alberta(Canada) Colombia Croatia OECDaverage-31 Chile Austria Brazil Italy Turkey Estonia SlovakRepublic Iceland Denmark Spain Israel Norway Mexico Finland Sweden UnitedStates England(UK) Australia NewZealand Netherlands CABA(Argentina) SouthAfrica Female teachers Male teachers Percentage of teachers for whom teaching was their first choice as a career % Tab I.4.4 A first choice ?
  8. 8. Highest educational attainment of teachers 0 20 40 60 80 100 SlovakRepublic Portugal CzechRepublic Finland Croatia Italy Georgia Russia Bulgaria Estonia France Slovenia Sweden Latvia UnitedStates Colombia Israel OECDaverage-31 Austria Romania Netherlands Korea Lithuania Hungary Norway UnitedArabEmirates Iceland England(UK) Malta Mexico Singapore CABA(Argentina) Alberta(Canada) Chile NewZealand Belgium Shanghai(China) Japan Flemish(Belgium) Denmark Turkey Brazil SaudiArabia Kazakhstan SouthAfrica VietNam Australia Below ISCED level 5 ISCED level 5 ISCED level 6 ISCED level 7 ISCED level 8% Percentage of teachers, by highest level of formal education completed Masters-level
  9. 9. WHAT DO THEY DO?
  10. 10. Teachers’ total working hours Average number of working hours (i.e. 60 minutes) teachers report having spent in total during the most recent complete calendar week 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Japan Kazakhstan Alberta(Canada) England(UK) UnitedStates VietNam Singapore NewZealand Shanghai(China) Australia Russia Sweden Colombia Norway UnitedArabEmirates Portugal Slovenia Croatia Hungary Denmark OECDaverage-31 Iceland CzechRepublic Bulgaria Chile France Austria Flemish(Belgium) Malta Spain Netherlands SlovakRepublic Estonia Mexico Lithuania Belgium Latvia SouthAfrica Korea Romania Finland Israel Turkey Italy Brazil CABA(Argentina) SaudiArabia Georgia Hours per week
  11. 11. Teachers’ working hours spent on teaching and use of class time during a typical lesson Average number of working hours (i.e. 60 minutes) teachers report having spent on teaching during the most recent complete calendar week 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Chile UnitedStates Alberta(Canada) Colombia SouthAfrica Turkey Russia UnitedArabEmirates Mexico Brazil Israel Hungary Latvia Estonia Finland SaudiArabia OECDaverage-31 NewZealand England(UK) Portugal SlovakRepublic Australia Bulgaria Iceland Croatia Spain Slovenia Denmark Austria CzechRepublic Lithuania Malta Sweden Belgium Flemish(Belgium) France Georgia Korea VietNam Japan Singapore Cyprus Netherlands ChineseTaipei Romania CABA(Argentina) Italy Norway Kazakhstan Other tasks Administrative tasks Keeping order in the classroom Actual teaching and learning Hours per week Table I.2.27 and I.2.10
  12. 12. Teachers' self-efficacy 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Make my expectations about student behaviour clear Get students to follow classroom rules Control disruptive behaviour in the classroom Calm a student who is disruptive or noisy Provide an alternative explanation Craft good questions for students Vary instructional strategies in my classroom Use a variety of assessment strategies Get students to believe they can do well in school work Help students value learning Help students think critically Motivate students who show low interest in school work Support student learning through the use of ICT Instruction Student engagement Enhanced activities OECD average-31 Percentage of teachers who feel they can do the following "quite a bit" or "a lot“ Classroom management %
  13. 13. 80 85 90 95 100 Most teachers believe that the students’ well-being is important Teachers and students usually get on well with each other Most teachers are interested in what students have to say If a student needs extra assistance, the school provides it Teachers can rely on each other Most teachers believe that the students’… Percentage of teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" with the following statements about what happens in their school % Tab I.3.46 Teachers and students usually get on well with each other…
  14. 14. 50 60 70 80 90 Fewer than or equal to 30% More than 30% Under age 30 Age 50 and above Novice Experienced OECD average-31 Average proportion of time teachers spend on actual teaching and learning in a typical lesson, by teacher and school characteristics % Fig I.2.5 Classroom time spent on teaching By concentration of students from socio- economically disadvantaged homes By age By teaching experience
  15. 15. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Georgia CABA(Argentina) Estonia Hungary Lithuania Latvia Brazil Portugal Norway Chile Iceland Belgium Spain Denmark Mexico Sweden Slovenia Finland Bulgaria Netherlands Austria Kazakhstan Flemish(Belgium) Russia VietNam Croatia OECDaverage-31 CzechRepublic SlovakRepublic Italy Israel Malta Korea Colombia Romania SaudiArabia France SouthAfrica Alberta(Canada) UnitedArabEmirates UnitedStates Australia Turkey Singapore NewZealand England(UK) Japan Shanghai(China) Teachers entering the profession with no induction Percentage of teachers who did not take part in any induction activities during their first employment % New Fig (Tab I.4.38)
  16. 16. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Planned meetings with principal and/or experienced… Supervision by principal and/or experienced teachers Courses/seminars attended in person General/administrative introduction Networking/collaboration with other new teachers Team teaching with experienced teachers Portfolios/diaries/journals Online courses/seminars Reduced teaching load Online activities OECD average-30 Percentage of lower secondary teachers reporting that the following provisions are included in teacher induction at their current school % Fig I.4.10 Provisions for induction
  17. 17. Mentoring 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 UnitedArabEmirates SouthAfrica Kazakhstan Singapore Brazil NewZealand Shanghai(China) Japan Israel Australia UnitedStates SaudiArabia VietNam England(UK) Netherlands Colombia Russia Alberta(Canada) FlemishComm.… Mexico Georgia Korea Cyprus Malta OECDaverage-31 ChineseTaipei CzechRepublic Portugal Belgium Iceland Bulgaria Romania Turkey SlovakRepublic Sweden Hungary Chile Norway Denmark CABA(Argentina) Latvia France Estonia Finland Austria Croatia Spain Italy Lithuania Slovenia Novice teachers Experienced teachers Percentage of teachers who have an assigned mentor as part of a formal arrangement at the school, by teachers' teaching experience % Fig I.4.14
  18. 18. Elements included in training 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Content of some or all subject(s) taught General pedagogy Pedagogy of some or all subject(s) taught Classroom practice in some or all subject(s) taught Student behaviour and classroom management Monitoring students’ development and learning Teaching cross-curricular skills Teaching in a mixed ability setting Use of ICT for teaching Teaching in a multicultural or multilingual setting Element was included in formal education or training Well or "very well" prepared for the element % 53% Percentage of teachers for whom the following elements were included in their formal education or training and for which they feel “well” or “very well” prepared Fig I.4.4 72%
  19. 19. 0 5 10 15 20 25 Fewer than or equal to 30% More than 30% Fewer than or equal to 10% More than 10% By concentration of immigrant studentsBy concentration of students from socio- economically disadvantaged homes Percentage of novice teachers, by school characteristics % Fig I.4.9 Alignment of resources and needs
  20. 20. Keeping up to date
  21. 21. 80 85 90 95 100 Lithuania Shanghai(China) Australia Austria Alberta(Canada) Latvia NewZealand Singapore Slovenia Kazakhstan Netherlands Russia Croatia UnitedStates Korea Estonia UnitedArabEmirates CzechRepublic Flemish(Belgium) England(UK) VietNam Israel Bulgaria Iceland Sweden Hungary OECDaverage-31 Belgium Norway Turkey Georgia Italy Finland CABA(Argentina) Denmark SlovakRepublic Spain Malta Colombia SouthAfrica Mexico Japan Romania Portugal Brazil Chile SaudiArabia France Participation in professional development Percentage of teachers who participated in professional development activities in the 12 months prior to the survey% Fig I.5.1
  22. 22. … and not so much in the most effective forms of professional development
  23. 23. SOME CHALLENGES
  24. 24. Fig I.3.6 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 More than 10% of students have special needs At least 1% of students are refugees More than 10% of students have a first language different from the language(s) of instruction More than 30% of students come from socio-economically disadvantaged homes More than 10% of students are immigrants or with migrant background OECD average-30 Percentage of teachers teaching in schools with the following composition % Classrooms are characterised by a high diversity of students from diverse backgrounds
  25. 25. Fig I.3.12 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Intimidation or bullying among students A student or parent/guardian reports unwanted electronic contact among students Intimidation or verbal abuse of teachers or staff Vandalism and theft A student or parent/guardian reports postings of hurtful information on the Internet about students Physical injury caused by violence among students Use/possession of drugs and/or alcohol OECD average-30 Percentage of principals reporting that the following incidents occurred at least weekly in their school % Disruptive incidents
  26. 26. 0 10 20 30 40 50 NewZealand Flemish(Belgium) Finland England(UK) Brazil Sweden France Israel Bulgaria Mexico Norway Alberta(Canada) Netherlands Romania Estonia Latvia SlovakRepublic Portugal Spain Singapore Denmark Croatia Chile Italy Iceland CzechRepublic Georgia Japan Korea Shanghai(China) 2018 2013 Percentage of principals reporting that “physical and non-physical forms of bullying among students” occurred at least weekly in their school% Fig I.3.13 Bullying
  27. 27. Innovation in teaching
  28. 28. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Georgia VietNam Shanghai(China) Bulgaria UnitedArabEmirates Lithuania Latvia Romania SaudiArabia Kazakhstan Russia Estonia Norway SlovakRepublic Hungary Brazil Slovenia Turkey Alberta(Canada) SouthAfrica Iceland Denmark Colombia Mexico England(UK) CABA(Argentina) Sweden Singapore Australia OECDaverage-31 NewZealand Chile Austria Croatia UnitedStates Japan Israel Italy Korea France Spain Finland CzechRepublic Netherlands Malta Flemish(Belgium) Belgium Portugal Teachers’ views on their colleagues’ attitudes towards innovation Percentage of teachers who “agree” or “strongly agree” that most teachers in the school are open to change% Fig I.2.12
  29. 29. What principals see as hindering quality instruction 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Shortage of support personnel Shortage of teachers with competence in special needs students Shortage or inadequacy of time for instructional leadership Shortage or inadequacy of physical infrastructure Shortage or inadequacy of time with students Shortage or inadequacy of instructional space Shortage or inadequacy of digital technology for instruction Shortage of qualified teachers Shortage of teachers with competence in a multicultural setting Insufficient Internet access Shortage or inadequacy of necessary materials to train vocational skills Shortage of teachers with competence in disadvantaged students Shortage or inadequacy of library materials Shortage of vocational teachers Shortage or inadequacy of instructional materials OECD average-30 Percentage of principals reporting that the following shortages of resources hinder the school's capacity to provide quality instruction "quite a bit" or "a lot" % Figure I.3.15
  30. 30. WHAT TEACHERS THINK GOVERNMENT SHOULD DO
  31. 31. Teachers’ views on spending priorities 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Reducing class sizes by recruiting more staff Improving teacher salaries Offering high quality professional development for teachers Reducing teachers’ administration load by recruiting more support staff Improving school buildings and facilities Supporting students with special needs Investing in ICT Supporting students from disadvantaged or migrant backgrounds Investing in instructional materials Percentage of teachers who reported the following spending priorities to be of “high importance” % Fig I.3.16
  32. 32. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000 Percentageofteachersreporting improvingteacherssalariesasa spendingpriority Teachers’ statutory salaries, in public institutions (PPP equivalence) Improving teacher salaries Improving teacher salaries as a highly-important spending priority for lower secondary teachers and lower secondary teachers' statutory starting salaries Below the OECD average Above the OECD average Denmark Brazil Iceland AustriaFinland Slovenia Chile Mexico Flemish Comm. (Belgium)
  33. 33. Find out more about our work at www.oecd.org/education/TALIS – All publications – Country notes – Videos – The complete micro-level database Emails: Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.org and TALIS@oecd.org Twitter: SchleicherOECD and #OECDTALIS Wechat: AndreasSchleicher Thank you

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